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#21 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 11:18 AM

I wouldn't go for exotic stuff necessarily, but really top quality ingredients: thre best meat the best fish and so on.
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#22 Futtocks

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 01:33 PM

QUOTE (Trojan @ Feb 22 2010, 10:39 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I've had pheasant. It's a few years ago. I used to work with a guy who shot (and smoked) so I swapped him 200 Regal Kings bought in Spain for a brace of pheasant. Can't say I was impressed. It seemed dry and tasteless.


Pheasant's pleasant enough, but not a particularly exotic taste. Being a game bird, it has little fat so will dry out quickly if not regularly basted. Pigeon can be had from some butchers, Waitrose, or (frozen) from oriental supermarkets. Again, it must be kept moist, but is a much more interesting flavour than pheasant or partridge.

Quail is farmed (more fat), and can be roasted pretty vigorously. I tend to just season them well with salt and pepper, stuff a couple of cherry peppers inside, then sear them in a pan before roasting.

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#23 Futtocks

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 01:40 PM

QUOTE (hindle xiii @ Feb 21 2010, 08:24 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As part of my new year resolution, I'm looking at trying a new food or drink every month.

So far I have tried Japanese sake (saki) and venison. I have some others in mind but I'm throwing the doors open to anymore exciting suggestions. (And don't say 'salad', I know some of you smart arses are thinking it!)

My other ideas for future months include:

  • goose foie gras
  • caviar
  • quince
  • dragonfruit
  • steak tartare
  • oysters
  • sea bream
  • tripe
  • frog's legs
  • kangaroo


Of the above:
  • Foie gras (Duck or Goose) is delicious, and there are more and more suppliers who rear the birds more humanely than the horror stories that are regularly circulated.
  • Caviare. The cheap/medium priced stuff's nothing to write home about, while the really good stuff is prohibitively expensive.
  • Quince. You can, in some delicatessens and supermarkets (i.e. Sainsbury) get Membrillo, which is a stiff quince jelly which is traditionally served with white, crumble cheese. A good combination.
  • Dragon Fruit. About a hundred times more interesting to look at than to eat. Pleasant, but a little bland.
  • Steak tartare. The flavour is lovely, but it's the texture that turns most people off.
  • Oysters. Love 'em.
  • Frog's Legs. Chickeny.
  • Nice red meat, Kangaroo.


A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#24 Futtocks

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 01:41 PM

QUOTE (Number 16 @ Feb 22 2010, 11:01 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I've come across that mob at the Pub & Bar Expo. They were handing out samples to try so I ate my fill of crocodile, locust, snake and a number of other creatures I'd rather not be reminded of. ohmy.gif


I've had springbok, eland and crocodile from them. Very good stuff.

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#25 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 01:43 PM

QUOTE (Futtocks @ Feb 22 2010, 01:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Pheasant's pleasant enough, but not a particularly exotic taste. Being a game bird, it has little fat so will dry out quickly if not regularly basted. Pigeon can be had from some butchers, Waitrose, or (frozen) from oriental supermarkets. Again, it must be kept moist, but is a much more interesting flavour than pheasant or partridge.

Quail is farmed (more fat), and can be roasted pretty vigorously. I tend to just season them well with salt and pepper, stuff a couple of cherry peppers inside, then sear them in a pan before roasting.

I like to casserole pheasant in red wine and seasoning, with some red currant jelly in the mix.
its nice with mustard mash.
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#26 Trojan

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 04:17 PM

QUOTE (Futtocks @ Feb 22 2010, 01:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Quail is farmed (more fat), and can be roasted pretty vigorously. I tend to just season them well with salt and pepper, stuff a couple of cherry peppers inside, then sear them in a pan before roasting.



I've had quail - off a van at a market in Italy - very tasty.
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#27 Tiny Tim

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 10:14 PM

QUOTE (Futtocks @ Feb 22 2010, 01:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Pigeon can be had from some butchers, Waitrose, or (frozen) from oriental supermarkets. Again, it must be kept moist, but is a much more interesting flavour than pheasant or partridge.

We made pigeon and rabbit stew at one scout camp, it was pleasant enough. Pigeon and rabbit roasted over an open fire on the other hand was not particularly pleasant, far too dried out and chewy.

In Spain last year I tried sheep brain, which to be honest didn't taste of an awful lot and the texture wasn't very appealing, the rest of the tapas was superb.

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#28 hindle xiii

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 11:51 PM

I've added swordfish and snails to my list of possibilities so far.

If you use "should of", "would of" or "could of", you are a moron.

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#29 hindle xiii

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 09:07 PM

This may go into next year already!

If you use "should of", "would of" or "could of", you are a moron.

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#30 hindle xiii

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 09:09 PM

Tripe tomorrow.

If you use "should of", "would of" or "could of", you are a moron.

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#31 Ullman

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 09:59 PM

QUOTE (Trojan @ Feb 22 2010, 10:39 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I've had pheasant. It's a few years ago. I used to work with a guy who shot (and smoked) so I swapped him 200 Regal Kings bought in Spain for a brace of pheasant. Can't say I was impressed. It seemed dry and tasteless.

We had pheasant once when one collided with the goods train my dad was driving at the time.

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#32 Mumby Magic

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 10:49 PM

QUOTE (hindle xiii @ Mar 1 2010, 09:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Tripe tomorrow.


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#33 timtum

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 12:50 PM

Dining in French restaurants, 8 out of 10 ten times I sit next to someone noshing away on andouillette (tripe sausage). They (the sausages that is, I think) smell of poo.
In the South of France and fancy a banger?
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#34 MattSantos

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 01:04 PM

Last night i cooked a salad of toasted pine nuts, pack choi, broccolli and sprouts.

Served with griddled tuna steak.

Lovely.



Tonight i fancy cooking something closer to home; a roast.



#35 Futtocks

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 01:31 PM

QUOTE (MattSantos @ Mar 3 2010, 01:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Last night i cooked a salad of toasted pine nuts, pack choi, broccolli and sprouts.

Served with griddled tuna steak.

Lovely.

Tonight i fancy cooking something closer to home; a roast.


I like pak choi. Much easier to get these days, too. Stir fried with ginger, garlic and soy sauce, then finished with a touch of sesame oil is a nice way to have it.

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#36 MattSantos

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 01:47 PM

QUOTE (Futtocks @ Mar 3 2010, 01:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I like pak choi. Much easier to get these days, too. Stir fried with ginger, garlic and soy sauce, then finished with a touch of sesame oil is a nice way to have it.


I was with you until sesame oil. I can't stand it. I love Asian food to be clean and fresh, sesame oil just ruins it.

Pak choi also stays fresh for a long time, too.





On a general food note, it amazes me how poorly people eat. The people around my desk have the most appaling eating habits and yet they're stick thin!

Damn my gluttonous ways.




#37 Futtocks

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 01:50 PM

QUOTE (MattSantos @ Mar 3 2010, 01:47 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I was with you until sesame oil. I can't stand it. I love Asian food to be clean and fresh, sesame oil just ruins it.


I find you have to use it with a very light touch, or it dominates everything.

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#38 John Rhino

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 01:55 PM

QUOTE (l'angelo mysterioso @ Feb 22 2010, 09:48 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
check out how they make foie gras


You beat me to it. A lot of shops and resturants in this country have stopped selling it. It is produced by prolonged cruelty. Stick to liver pate.

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#39 getdownmonkeyman

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 01:57 PM

QUOTE (Futtocks @ Mar 3 2010, 01:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I like pak choi. Much easier to get these days, too. Stir fried with ginger, garlic and soy sauce, then finished with a touch of sesame oil is a nice way to have it.



Sesame oil as a dressing or stir fry oil? If cooking, my preference is for grapeseed oil. Good resistance to burning and tastes of nothing.

Pak choi cookd in garlic, smothered in soy. Hmmmmmmmm.

#40 Futtocks

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 02:07 PM

QUOTE (John Rhino @ Mar 3 2010, 01:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You beat me to it. A lot of shops and restaurants in this country have stopped selling it. It is produced by prolonged cruelty. Stick to liver pate.


There's a lot of hysteria and hyperbole spouted about foie gras production. There have also been some shops/restaurants targeted by sickos who threaten the owners' children/family etc.

True, some producers do use methods that are cruel (if not as cruel as some campaigners claim), but you can buy the stuff from ethical/humane producers too. Just check before you buy.

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)





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