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Flextickets


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#21 Maximus Decimus

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 08:58 AM

QUOTE (Griff @ Aug 28 2010, 09:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If that's so, why offer season tickets at all ? Presumably the clubs expect punters to turn up to insufficient games to make their season ticket pay.


Why would they? You're not understanding the point at all. Season tickets make the clubs more money because it guarantees them a certain amount of money from a number of fans. If they didn't offer them the reality would be that they would end up with less money even though the individual games price are more as people would not attend for whatever reason. Almost every ST holder I know doesn't make it to every game. I bought one for my 2 nephews who have probably made a third of the games.

Therefore as a business Season Tickets make sense. They provide you with guaranteed income higher than that you would get without them. They also provide it at the beginning of the season, allowing you to plan. NRL clubs have never needed them because of other revenue streams but they are starting to increase them year on year because they are financially beneficial.

You have no evidence that Flextickets would increase income, none at all. Therefore suggesting that clubs would somehow be stuck in the past for not using them doesn't work. Clubs will use them if they increase income, if they don't they won't. That's Capitalism. Not all clubs would jump on straight away but the best would and the rest would see the benefit.

Say Hull FC sold 10,000 season tickets this year. That's a guaranteed say 140 x 10,000 = 1.4m. Now say these flextickets came in and a large proportion of people (6,000) bought one instead of a season ticket and they were say 60 for 5 home games anytime. That's 360,000 added to the 560,000, that has still been purchased from ST's coming to 920,000 to start the season with. Say Hull FC have a poor start to the season and many people decide not to get another Flexticket for the rest of the season and start picking and choosing their games. Hull FC then have a shortfall of at least 500,000 to make up that they would have had automatically from season tickets. That's ignoring the fact that people with season tickets may bring other fans along who would also stop going.

I'm not saying the above is true it is a hypothetical situation, but financially a Flexticket might be madness. There are unforseen issues as they have not been tested. Let's see if a club actually trials them and they work before judging clubs for not using them suggesting they are not, 'moving with the times.'

Edited by Maximus Decimus, 28 August 2010 - 09:00 AM.


#22 Old Frightful

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 09:10 AM

QUOTE (Griff @ Aug 28 2010, 09:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Are they still running that 6 for the price of 5 Flexiticket ? dry.gif

If a club's got seat reservation issues, there's nothing to say that the two schemes can't run parallel to one another.

Very few problems are insurmountable.

You're correct in so far as they ran a part season pass a few years back, when you could get 6 games for the price of 5 halfway through the season but I don't think they've done it for at least a couple of seasons, not sure why.


          NO BUTS IT'S GOT TO BE BUTTER......                                 Z1N2MybzplQR6XBrwB9egniMH8xqYQ5s.jpg                                                                                                                     


#23 Jangling_Jack

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 09:46 AM

Season tickets and pre-booked tickets allow clubs to plan for gameday in respect to stewarding, how many snackbars and entrances to open. It is one of the reasons clubs like people to pre-purchase tickets for games. I could only see the scheme working if people specified the matches they wished to see before they bought the tickets, which is what Huddersfield did with their flexi-ticket offer. Unfortunately this would make the flexi part of the scheme less flexible.

#24 Dirk Diggler

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 10:01 AM

The analogy with Tesco and beans is invalid because no one is a Tesco fan. No one would stop shopping if their Tesco shut. Your club does not play RL 24 hours a day and sell you a ticket to watch 80 minutes of it at a time of your chosing.
Your RL club is a business working on a small turnover so cash flow is the killer. You will have noticed that players get contracts which entitle them to be paid regularly. You will know that HMRC are no longer prepared to accept their due when you have the money but want it on time now. Banks & suppliers are the same. Clubs will like the flexi ticket idea when they have players and suppliers on flexi deals and can go back to flexi tax/NI and flexi loans.
It obviously seems that season tickets work against the loyal fan but that is part of being a fan rather than a customer. Fans may like the flexibility of cost but when the 13 on the paddock reflects that flexibility and the scoreboard/league table reflects it they may be less than happy. A club that is a play thing might be able to trial this based on someone's willingness to underwrite the risk and plug the cash flow gaps but no club that is actually a standalone business will take the chance.

#25 Griff

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 10:45 AM

QUOTE (Maximus Decimus @ Aug 28 2010, 09:58 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Why would they? You're not understanding the point at all. Season tickets make the clubs more money because it guarantees them a certain amount of money from a number of fans. If they didn't offer them the reality would be that they would end up with less money even though the individual games price are more as people would not attend for whatever reason. Almost every ST holder I know doesn't make it to every game. I bought one for my 2 nephews who have probably made a third of the games.


Fair points - and while punters keep buying uneconomic season tickets, they're very valid.

However, I'll leave you with these points.

1. When clubs offer very cheap season tickets, I would question whether these maximise their income. Sheffield, for example, offered a 2010 season ticket for 70, pretty much half of their price for the previous season. Given that existing season ticket holders were prepared to pay the full price in 2009 and presumably most would have done so again in 2010, did they sell enough season tickets in 2010 to "maximise their income" ? Not to mention the effect on the walk-up gate. The published gate figures suggest not.

2. The free Challenge Cup ticket for season ticket holders has been a financial disaster for Championship clubs who now need to reach round 5 for a big payday against a Superleague club. Something had to be done to revitalise the Cup - in its early rounds at least - but this hasn't been good. Flexitickets would have been a better option.

3. I disagree that season tickets help you plan your budgets. To some extent it's true, but the reality is that you need to set your budgets, particularly the playing wages budget, four or five months before you know what your season ticket income is.
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