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#141 Amber Avenger

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 12:48 PM

Finished Martin Kelner’s book “Sit Down and Cheer”  recently – a history of sport on TV. I would thoroughly recommend it for anyone on this forum, a packed history which I guess those a little older than I may know a bit about already but it’s fun to see how much the world of sport has changed because of TV. Plenty of RL references as you would expect if you know anything about Mr. Kelner and a bit about how Sky changed RL forever.

 

One of the better lines in the book is RL fans viewing the game going to satellite “with levels of suspicion usually reserved for southerners and Rugby Union” :lol:


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#142 Futtocks

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 12:54 PM

Finished Martin Kelner’s book “Sit Down and Cheer”  recently – a history of sport on TV. I would thoroughly recommend it for anyone on this forum, a packed history which I guess those a little older than I may know a bit about already but it’s fun to see how much the world of sport has changed because of TV. Plenty of RL references as you would expect if you know anything about Mr. Kelner and a bit about how Sky changed RL forever.
 
One of the better lines in the book is RL fans viewing the game going to satellite “with levels of suspicion usually reserved for southerners and Rugby Union” :lol:

I've been thinking about buying that - MK's usually good fun.

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#143 hindle xiii

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 12:57 PM

I've a few Gillette Yearbooks from 2004-2011 to go to a good home...


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#144 Moose

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 10:12 PM

I remember reading Peter Hoeg's book "Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow" about 10/12 years ago and even now every so often I remember the sheer pleasure it gave me. A wonderful book.



#145 Geoff Lee

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:10 AM

Have just about finished writing my fifth novel to follow on from One Winter, One Spring, One Summer and One Autumn and I am going to call it Two Seasons.
The background will again be one of Work, Family Life and Rugby League this time in 2002 and 2003 in the fictional South Lancashire town of Ashurst

www.geofflee.net for news of my novels, One Winter, One Spring, One Summer, One Autumn and Two Seasons. All are written against a strong Rugby League background, set in South Lancashire and inspired by the old saying about work: "They could write a book about this place. It would be a best seller".

 


#146 Futtocks

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:52 AM


I remember reading Peter Hoeg's book "Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow" about 10/12 years ago and even now every so often I remember the sheer pleasure it gave me. A wonderful book.


Agreed, a very good read.

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#147 gingerjon

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 02:40 PM

I've just finished reading The Sign of the Four which is a Sherlock Holmes novel to avoid.  Unlike The Hound of the Baskervilles which I read before it.  They are both racist, sexist, ridiculously 'of their time' and absolutely bonkers but the latter is at least coherent and features a large dog and a proper murderer.  They're both free on Kindle - read the Hound and you'll be done in about two hours.


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#148 Futtocks

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 02:47 PM

Eduardo Galeano - Mirrors. A history of the world, no less, told in Galeano's distinctive style of short, laconic tales, often no more than a paragraph or two per story.

Edited by Futtocks, 18 April 2013 - 02:47 PM.

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#149 Steve May

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 10:49 AM

I remember reading Peter Hoeg's book "Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow" about 10/12 years ago and even now every so often I remember the sheer pleasure it gave me. A wonderful book.

I really enjoyed the first half, but it got bogged down in the middle and I gave up.

I saw the film, and I recall thinking the second half of the film was daft.

Two books that I've read and that I enjoyed so much that when I recall them I actually think of the scenes as alsmot like real memories rather than words are The Secret History by Donna Tartt and Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson.

That's me.  I'm done.


#150 Steve May

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 10:53 AM

To help me through two very long flights and a fortnight in a hotel, I have Parade's End and The Siege of Krishnapur with me

I'm about half way through Parade's End (courtesy of 22 hours in the company of Emirates airlines) and enjoying it enormously. Hopefully I'll finish it in time to read The Siege of Krishnapur more or less in one on the way back.


Reading a book from start to finish with no breaks is a real pleasure. But it's rare that I have the time and even rarer that I have the time and the right book.

That's me.  I'm done.


#151 Futtocks

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 09:05 AM

Just finished Andrey Kurkov's latest 'The Milkman in the Night'. Strange, very strange, and hard to describe without spoilers. It'll take at least one re-read to get the best out of it, as there are quite a lot of interconnected characters. While my favourite Kurkov book is still 'Death and the Penguin', this is very very good, and I'd recommend it. It is a denser read but not a difficult one, once you get into the swing of it.

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#152 marklaspalmas

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 09:55 AM

 Hopefully I'll finish it in time to read The Siege of Krishnapur more or less in one on the way back.
 

 

Marvellous book. Loved it.



#153 Griff9of13

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 12:39 PM

Just started The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists by Robert Tressell. Very impressed with what I've read so far, but also very depressing as nothing much seems to have changed in the intervening 100 years since the book was written. :(


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#154 Bearman

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 01:04 PM

I've pretty much given up reading and turned to audio books. Almost finished the new Lee Child Never Go Back. As I spend so much time into car it's a really convenient way to pass the time.
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#155 Futtocks

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 01:09 PM

I've pretty much given up reading and turned to audio books. Almost finished the new Lee Child Never Go Back. As I spend so much time into car it's a really convenient way to pass the time.

I've tried audiobooks a few times over the years, but they just don't do it for me, for some reason.


Edited by Futtocks, 02 September 2013 - 01:10 PM.

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#156 ckn

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 01:28 PM

I've tried audiobooks a few times over the years, but they just don't do it for me, for some reason.

I can't get the hang of them.  I think it's because if I lose concentration momentarily while reading I can just scan my eyes back a paragraph, it's far more annoying to scan back an audio book.  There's also the point that I enjoy silence while reading, I'll often stick in my active noise cancelling headphones with nothing playing through them.  It's why I enjoy reading when the wife's out, no sound in the house to the point I can hear the clock upstairs ticking away.


Arguing with the forum trolls is like playing chess with a pigeon.  No matter how good you are, the bird will **** on the board and strut around like it won anyway


#157 JohnM

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 01:38 PM

Just finishing "Welcome to Everytown - A Journey into the English Mind"  in which philosopher author Julian Baggini  spends 6 months in the country's most typical area, which turns out to be the area covered by postcode S66, which had a93% match with the national data set. Very interesting, very readable and very honest book, despite Baggini  being a true Guardianista



#158 Futtocks

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 01:50 PM

Currently reading  a free Amazon download on the Kindle - 'The Adventures and Vagaries of Twm Shôn Catti'. Good fun stuff it is too.


A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#159 Tiny Tim

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 03:12 PM

I recently discovered books by Raymond E Feist, I am on the final book of the Riftwar Saga which I have really enjoyed. Makes a nice change after ploughing through the Game of Thrones saga which really was well past it's prime by about book 3.


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#160 ckn

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 03:43 PM

I recently discovered books by Raymond E Feist, I am on the final book of the Riftwar Saga which I have really enjoyed. Makes a nice change after ploughing through the Game of Thrones saga which really was well past it's prime by about book 3.

You have a pleasant surprise coming then as the series following the Riftwar one, the serpent war saga is probably his best work. He sold out after that and went to far shorter books at the same price with lower quality. The Empire series he co-wrote with Janny Wurts are also excellent.

I first found Feist when he released his first book when I was 14. I've re-read Magician many times over the years.

The George RR Martin books started well but it was clear that he'd lost his plot notes by the 3rd. Also, one book every 5-7 years isn't that promising from an old, fat writer with health problems.

If you like challenging reads in that genre then Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen series are well worth a read. As is the Wheel of Time series done by Robert Jordan and finished by Brandon Sanderson after his death.

The Thomas Covenant chronicles by Stephen R Donaldson are darker reads with the name character being a morally bankrupt leper.

Arguing with the forum trolls is like playing chess with a pigeon.  No matter how good you are, the bird will **** on the board and strut around like it won anyway





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