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#81 Steve May

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 09:00 AM

There are people like that but offices in London are incredibly unfriendly, impersonal places. People simply do not talk to each other. Pubs can be another matter.


I worked in London for almost ten years. I found that because everyone got public transport home they could go out for a post work pint. The offices I've worked in outside London have been on industrial estates miles from a pub (or somewhere decent to get lunch) and everyone has to drive home anyway.

London is a terrific place to live and work. I love the place. Everyone should spend a few years living and working in a big city, just for the experience.

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#82 Steve May

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 09:08 AM

So who goes to these events? Must be Expat Northerners in London? Would these be the same people who cannot be bothered to watch the Broncos when it is the best value and cheapest pro elite sport in London they would rather watch the game on TV in a pub.


When I was an expat Northerner in London, I think I watched the Broncos/Quins about six times in almost ten years. On all but one of those occasions, they were playing Huddersfield. Just because I had moved to London didn't mean I changed the team I support.

I did watch the Skolars regularly, but I doubt I would have done if they hadn't been two divisions below Huddersfield.


And yes, I did used to go to all sorts of events and exhibitions when I was in London. If you're the kind of person who reads the listings magazine on a Sunday and thinks "Ooh, an exhibition on the political implications of cartographer...sounds interesting", then you'll find stuff to go and see wherever you are. If you just want to stay home and watch X Factor, that's fine, but you won't then really see the benefit of living in a big city like London.

Incidentally, there is a very active cultural life outside London as well. In fact, I think it's probably better because it's more inclusive in the sense that it usually seems to involve being active in it, rather than being a passive spectator.

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#83 Wolford6

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 09:31 AM

London is a fantastic place when you are young with no family responsibilities. Something to do every night and no home ownership, DIY, gardening, running the kids around etc to distract you. However, when you do meet someone and embark on those reponsibilities, you can't afford a house in the centre and you have to move to suburbia. Then you have to do all those tasks on top of a ~2.5 hour daily commute; in real terms the commute itself equates to working an extra day per week.

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#84 gingerjon

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 10:31 AM

Incidentally, there is a very active cultural life outside London as well. In fact, I think it's probably better because it's more inclusive in the sense that it usually seems to involve being active in it, rather than being a passive spectator.


I think this is true.

And I have been to a fantastic exhibition about the political implications of cartography.

In fact, two. I've been to two fantastic exhibitions about the political implications of cartography.
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#85 Northern Sol

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 12:42 PM

I worked in London for almost ten years. I found that because everyone got public transport home they could go out for a post work pint. The offices I've worked in outside London have been on industrial estates miles from a pub (or somewhere decent to get lunch) and everyone has to drive home anyway.


That is often true but it's also the case that office staff had little connection with where they worked. If you ask for directions in the centre of London then you'll often get the reply "I don't know mate, I only work here, I go home after work". Also because of the size of the offices and the rapid turnover of staff, people would wait a long time before they decided whether you were worth getting to know you. I knew people who had worked in a particular office for ten years but didn't have any real friends because they weren't part of any particular team so nobody bothered to talk to them.

#86 gingerjon

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:03 PM

That is often true but it's also the case that office staff had little connection with where they worked. If you ask for directions in the centre of London then you'll often get the reply "I don't know mate, I only work here, I go home after work". Also because of the size of the offices and the rapid turnover of staff, people would wait a long time before they decided whether you were worth getting to know you. I knew people who had worked in a particular office for ten years but didn't have any real friends because they weren't part of any particular team so nobody bothered to talk to them.


I've just done a quick count.

I think I've worked in 14 different offices in London.

Not one matches your description.

And we are all off for a drink after work later - if anyone asks for us for directions whilst we're walking over we'll just spin them some yarn about how we couldn't possibly know ...
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#87 Severus

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:11 PM

I think I've worked in 14 different offices in London.

Doesn't that suggest a high turnover?
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#88 gingerjon

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:13 PM

Doesn't that suggest a high turnover?


Only for me, to be honest!
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#89 hindle xiii

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:28 PM

People are the same all over the country, most sound as a pound, a few miserable sods and a small minority of pricks.

Or sarnd as a parnd.

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#90 Northern Sol

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:44 PM

I've just done a quick count.

I think I've worked in 14 different offices in London.

Not one matches your description.

And we are all off for a drink after work later - if anyone asks for us for directions whilst we're walking over we'll just spin them some yarn about how we couldn't possibly know ...


I've worked for at least six. They were all like that.

And it's not just me as I've worked in a fair few offices in Leeds and they were never like that.

#91 WearyRhino

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 02:00 PM

That is often true but it's also the case that office staff had little connection with where they worked. If you ask for directions in the centre of London then you'll often get the reply "I don't know mate, I only work here, I go home after work". Also because of the size of the offices and the rapid turnover of staff, people would wait a long time before they decided whether you were worth getting to know you. I knew people who had worked in a particular office for ten years but didn't have any real friends because they weren't part of any particular team so nobody bothered to talk to them.


Have you thought that maybe it's just you that nobody wants to get to know better and have a drink with? Can't think why mind.

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#92 Northern Sol

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 03:40 PM

Have you thought that maybe it's just you that nobody wants to get to know better and have a drink with? Can't think why mind.


Not really.

I had friends in my team.

It's just people didn't talk to people from other teams. And some people didn't talk to people in their own team.

#93 T-Dub

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 04:28 PM

During my 2.5 years in the smoke, mid 1980s, my office mates would go for a few drinks in central London on a Friday night when work was finished at the Co-Op HQ Stratford Broadwa, long since demolished, replaced by the new shopping centre opened for the Olympics

The City pubs mainly all shut by 8pm but the West End was always thronging

I was the only one that drank bitter (bleedin' norvener) but I was necessary to navigate the Londoners around London as my 'knowledge' was better than any of the locals

My concession was to seek out Sam Smiths pubs

#94 gingerjon

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 04:31 PM

My concession was to seek out Sam Smiths pubs


Five within 1/2 a mile of where I'm sitting.

Good times.
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#95 Futtocks

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 04:50 PM

The City pubs mainly all shut by 8pm but the West End was always thronging


A bit too thronging sometimes, at least 'til the theatre crowds had to leave for their shows.

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#96 Johnoco

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 07:52 PM

There are people like that but offices in London are incredibly unfriendly, impersonal places. People simply do not talk to each other. Pubs can be another matter.


I've never worked in an office so can't really relate to that. But I'm sure there are offices like that everywhere.

#97 Northern Sol

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 11:55 PM

I've never worked in an office so can't really relate to that. But I'm sure there are offices like that everywhere.


Possibly but I've only found them in London.

#98 Trojan

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 03:17 PM

That is often true but it's also the case that office staff had little connection with where they worked. If you ask for directions in the centre of London then you'll often get the reply "I don't know mate, I only work here, I go home after work". Also because of the size of the offices and the rapid turnover of staff, people would wait a long time before they decided whether you were worth getting to know you. I knew people who had worked in a particular office for ten years but didn't have any real friends because they weren't part of any particular team so nobody bothered to talk to them.

I had to travel to London in the mid-eighties to collect a replacement car- mine was badly damaged. (I have been there since <_< ) A number of people boarded the train at Doncaster, and clearly from their conversation they travelled together on this train every day. They commuted regularly from Doncaster to London for work. Presumably property was/ is still miles cheaper in Doncaster than in and around London. The train only takes 90 minutes from Doncaster to Kings Cross. So I suppose compared to travel times from "the Home Counties" it made/makes sense. What I wondered was is it still the case today or has the escalation in rail fares made it no longer an economical proposition?

Edited by Trojan, 09 December 2012 - 03:18 PM.

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#99 Northern Sol

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 04:20 PM

I would say that it was an impossibility these days.

#100 Methven Hornet

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 05:22 PM

I had to travel to London in the mid-eighties to collect a replacement car- mine was badly damaged. (I have been there since <_< ) A number of people boarded the train at Doncaster, and clearly from their conversation they travelled together on this train every day. They commuted regularly from Doncaster to London for work. Presumably property was/ is still miles cheaper in Doncaster than in and around London. The train only takes 90 minutes from Doncaster to Kings Cross. So I suppose compared to travel times from "the Home Counties" it made/makes sense. What I wondered was is it still the case today or has the escalation in rail fares made it no longer an economical proposition?


I do remember reading in the late eighties and nineties about Doncaster being an outlying suburb of London. Crazy, but then not as crazy as trying to afford property in London.
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