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What's your favourite Christmas Recipe?

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#1 RidingPie

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 01:43 PM

Since we're getting to 'that time of year' I was wondering if anyone had any nice recipes they wanted to share that they thought were particularly christmasy?

I'll start. Here is a recipe for mulled wine I've developed and tweaked over the last 10 years or so. Its done in a slow cooked (which means you don't need to worry so much about it boiling over and setting on fire on the hob)


This recipe is best done at least 24 hrs in advance.

4 bottles of the cheapest red wine you can find (it really doesn’t improve the recipe to use the expensive stuff)
2 Large Oranges
16 cloves
2 sticks of cinnamon
2 ltr Orange Juice
1 bottle of Cointreau
Brown sugar

This recipe requires a slow cooker which is excellent news as it keeps most of the alcohol in.
Method
Stud the oranges with 8 cloves in each (i.e. pierce the skin of the orange with a sharp knife and push the stem of the clove in the cut with the head still sticking out.
Put 2 bottles of wine, ½ the orange juice, the cinnamon, the oranges studded with cloves and 2 tbl spoons of brown sugar in to the slow cooker. Put the slow cooker on low, if it’s got a timer set it to 4 hours, but leave it in the slow cooker overnight.
About an hour before serving open up the slow cooker and add about a quarter of the bottle of Cointreau and a little more orange juice, mix a little then have a taste. Add more brown sugar, orange juice or Cointreau to taste.

You’ll notice you’ve two bottles of red wine left over on this. As you drink the mulled wine, it’s perfectly acceptable to top it up with the other bottles as long as you add a little more orange juice/ sugar as well.

Enjoy!

:)

#2 Futtocks

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 02:43 PM

Hmm... I hadn't thought of using the slow cooker for mulled wine. Or using Cointreau either, for that matter.

Here's a Russian recipe that has, in recent years, become a family favourite for Christmas Eve.

MUSHROOMS SHALYAPIN STYLE

Ingredients (serves 6)
  • 500g chopped mushrooms
  • 300g thin thread pasta (Tagliolini or Vermicelli)
  • Butter
  • 3 chopped medium white Onions
  • 150ml Sour Cream
  • 500g chopped Ham
  • 375g grated Cheese (a mixture of cheddar and mozzarella is good)
  • 5tsp chopped Parsley
  • Salt
  • Pepper
Instructions
1. Cook the pasta in salted water and drain.
2. While the pasta is still hot, put into a baking dish, season with salt & pepper and mix with some of the butter until it coats the pasta.
3. Gently fry the mushrooms and onions in butter or oil until soft. Season to taste.
4. Take the pan off the heat and stir the the sour cream into the mushrooms and onions.
5. Top the pasta with mushrooms, onions and sour cream.
6. Top with ham.
7. Top with cheese. You can sprinkle a little smoked paprika on top too, for colour and flavour.
8. Bake until cheese is coloured and bubbling.
9. Garnish with parsley.
Notes
You can be fairly approximate with the measurements. Just ensure a generous proportion of toppings to pasta.

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#3 RidingPie

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:12 PM

Hmm... I hadn't thought of using the slow cooker for mulled wine. Or using Cointreau either, for that matter.


I thought of the slow cooker one night after I looked away for about 10 seconds and the wine boiled over and set on fire. It was a moment of inspiration and I've never gone back. I'll admit the Cointreau was an attempt to get more alcohol in that worked ;)

The recipe sounds great. I'll definitely try!

#4 Futtocks

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:59 PM

The only thing I'd say about going for cheap wine is that I'd avoid the very cheapest stuff. Especially the ultra-budget French wines, which tend to be thin and light. You need richness and depth, so look for the cheapest/most heavily discounted new world Shiraz or Cabernet Sauvignon.

Malbec would be an even better variety to go with all those spices, but you rarely find a really cheap one of those.

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#5 RidingPie

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 05:30 PM

Ah you sound like a man with a passion for red. Maybe we should start the trl wine club ;)

#6 T-Dub

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 05:57 PM

Frummenty

Ancient, east Yorkshire tradition that I keep going for my dad

Can be savoury but usually sweet

Kibbled wheat (youll never find it, so grind some bulgar up by hand), soak in water and milk, boil, simmer, leave, add milk, maybe cinnamon, raisins whatever then add milk warm in oven and eat on Xmas Eve.

Repeat till New Years Eve

#7 Willie the Pimp

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:36 PM

Anybody else have cheese with their mince pies/xmas cake or is it just me?

#8 terrywebbisgod

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 07:05 PM

Anybody else have cheese with their mince pies/xmas cake or is it just me?

Cheese with Xmas cake is a fantastic.

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#9 Old Frightful

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 11:57 PM

In a prior lifetime I used to go with a girlfriend to her sister's house where her boyfriend used to do an astonishingly good Xmas meal for around ten of us. My fave bit was probably the four or five different home made stuffings he used to do. They were bloody fantastic.

Apparently everyone else thought so too but it had a rather unfortunate effect on us all so we used to go for a midnight walk to look at the stars. By 'eck, it was rather windy, even on the stillest of evenings... :ph34r:

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#10 hindle xiii

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 07:35 AM

Anybody else have cheese with their mince pies/xmas cake or is it just me?

I do. Although the Christmas cake and mince pies are usually an after-thought/excuse to have the cheese.

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#11 WearyRhino

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:20 AM

Large chunk of Stilton, large glass of Port. Drink. Followed by several more. Christmas!

#12 Futtocks

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:47 AM

Anybody else have cheese with their mince pies/xmas cake or is it just me?


A good, rich fruit cake and crumbly white cheese is a match made in heaven, but you have to harangue people to taste it - if you just describe it, they think you're mad.

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#13 Willie the Pimp

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:54 AM

A good, rich fruit cake and crumbly white cheese is a match made in heaven, but you have to harangue people to taste it - if you just describe it, they think you're mad.


Don't mind a wedge of crumbly Wensleydale with my mince pie or cake but prefer something stronger like a mature cheddar and to wash it down a glass of either port or madeira.

#14 RidingPie

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:25 AM

hrmmmm port and cheese! Yum

#15 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:56 AM

Frummenty

Ancient, east Yorkshire tradition that I keep going for my dad

Can be savoury but usually sweet

Kibbled wheat (youll never find it, so grind some bulgar up by hand), soak in water and milk, boil, simmer, leave, add milk, maybe cinnamon, raisins whatever then add milk warm in oven and eat on Xmas Eve.
In the Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas hardy. The anti hero gets drunk at the village fair on furmity see the similarity? It's similar to what you describe except it's alcoholic: I can't remember whether they added booze or whether they let it ferment
Repeat till New Years Eve


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#16 John Rhino

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:59 PM

Cheese with Xmas cake is a fantastic.


Indeed. But is has to be a good Wensleydale!

My favourite recipe for Chrismas day is the cauliflower soup I do for starters. Nicked from Gary Rhodes so better not repeat it on here!!

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