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Do you find it difficult to forgive and forget?


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30 replies to this topic

#1 Saint Billinge

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 12:59 PM

In the Season of goodwill, some families will still be torn apart over continued feuding, never able to shake hands and let bygones be bygones. Such is the hatred, it can go on until the grave. I do know of one person who now regrets not healing the wounds before a relative passed away. I know from personal experience that forgiving can be difficult. Divorce can often end in years of hurt and insults. Yet there are those who can forgive someone even for the most wicked of acts suffered, including the murderer of a loved one.

Is forgiving and forgetting difficult for you?

Edited by Saint Billinge, 26 December 2012 - 01:01 PM.


#2 Johnoco

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 01:24 PM

No. In fact I sometimes wish I could hold grudges better as I always end up 'giving in'! But ultimately, unless its something like murder or whatever, lifes too short.

#3 Saint Billinge

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 01:34 PM

No. In fact I sometimes wish I could hold grudges better as I always end up 'giving in'! But ultimately, unless its something like murder or whatever, lifes too short.


A big softy! :D Being able to forgive is a blessing to be treasured.

#4 Methven Hornet

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 01:48 PM

I'm okay with forgiving, so long as the person wants to be forgiven, ie, is willing to acknowledge what caused the problem, apologise, mend their ways.

My problem is getting others to forgive me! :lol:

Edited by Methven Hornet, 26 December 2012 - 01:51 PM.

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#5 Johnoco

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 01:56 PM

A big softy! :D Being able to forgive is a blessing to be treasured.

Probably. But I think it is from knowing a few people who have fallen out, sometimes over trivial stuff and its ended up going to the grave. 99 times out of a hundred it isn't worth it.

#6 Marauder

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 02:03 PM

I have no problem at all in forgiving.
Carlsberg don't do Soldiers, but if they did, they would probably be Brits.



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#7 Johnoco

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 02:06 PM

I have no problem at all in forgiving.

To me though, forgiving has to go with forgetting otherwise it isn't really. Not that I always practice what I'm preaching of course.

#8 Marauder

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 02:12 PM

To me though, forgiving has to go with forgetting otherwise it isn't really. Not that I always practice what I'm preaching of course.

Forget and you will be forgiving again and again and again.
Carlsberg don't do Soldiers, but if they did, they would probably be Brits.



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#9 guess who

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 04:44 PM

No.

My daughter was attacked by two dogs. Which then went on to rip my dog apart. In front of her, whilst she was walking them around our local park.
The owner has been charged and its still going through the courts. The dogs have been sized by the police.
She the owner has gone and got two new dogs and is walking them round the park.

I can honestly say i could kill her. I am finding it very, very hard not to.

I am dreading the court date for the final trail. Because if i don't think justice has been served. I dont think i will be able to stop myself.

#10 southstand loiner

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 05:09 PM

i dont find a problem i just dont forgive
its not a problem to me
ah a sunday night in front of the telly watching old rugby league games.
does life get any better .

#11 Saint Billinge

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 05:15 PM

No.

My daughter was attacked by two dogs. Which then went on to rip my dog apart. In front of her, whilst she was walking them around our local park.
The owner has been charged and its still going through the courts. The dogs have been sized by the police.
She the owner has gone and got two new dogs and is walking them round the park.

I can honestly say i could kill her. I am finding it very, very hard not to.

I am dreading the court date for the final trail. Because if i don't think justice has been served. I dont think i will be able to stop myself.


I know where you are coming from, Jim. However, the inner-torment carried on no matter what the outcome can cause severe stress.

#12 Bleep1673

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 09:16 PM

I hold grudges longer than I should.



`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.




"Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!"
He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought --
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.
And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!
One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.
"And, has thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!'
He chortled in his joy.



`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

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#13 Pie tries

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 11:16 PM

Can't forgive the French RU for what (and how) they did to French RL in WW2, would do if they were to ever apologise and return the money they stole while collaborating.

#14 getdownmonkeyman

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 12:42 AM

There is usually a strong reason you can't forgive.

#15 Johnoco

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 02:23 AM

I've been on the pass all day and still can't be arsed holding as much of a grudge of some.

Jesus, don't live life like that - its not.....



Ah **** jj

#16 southstand loiner

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 09:44 AM

There is usually a strong reason you can't forgive.


why analize the reasons just accept people are different
ah a sunday night in front of the telly watching old rugby league games.
does life get any better .

#17 Johnoco

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:24 AM

Blimey, that Jameson whiskey is bad news...

#18 southstand loiner

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:49 AM

Blimey, that Jameson whiskey is bad news...


sure is try bushmills or powers just as strong but not as much after effects
ah a sunday night in front of the telly watching old rugby league games.
does life get any better .

#19 Saint Billinge

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 11:28 AM

A relative of mine refused to speak to her daughter for over 30 years just because she married a man of the Catholic faith. Only on her death bed did she finally break her stubborn stance.

Edited by Saint Billinge, 27 December 2012 - 11:28 AM.


#20 gazza77

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 11:40 AM

I can be a right stubborn sod at times, but I can generally forgive without too much of a problem in a reasonable amount of time. Having said that, I've never been wronged by anyone that badly that I've felt the urge to never speak to them again or seek some sort of significant retribution.

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