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#21 Old Frightful

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:31 AM

Back in 1997, I spent a couple of weeks (don't say fortnight, they don't know what it means) based in Baltimore, staying with a mate who was working there at the time. His apartment was in Fells Point which was just about the nicest place I saw in all the time I was there. It's got a beautiful waterfront, plenty of bars and even an historic feel to it, which you'll struggle to find in most places in the States. Oh, and the bars all sell seafood to die for in that part of the World.

Fells Point

Also travelled to Philadelphia, NY and a few other places such as York and Lancaster , which are actually only about 20 miles apart over there. Didn't much care for Philadelphia but New York has to be experienced. We only spent a night there but you'll probably find that even a week isn't enough. If you get the chance, make sure a trip to Ellis Island on the ferry is on your list of things to do. There is a very moving museum there telling the stories of the lucky and not so lucky people who tried to gain entry into the States and whose futures were decided in a matter of a minute or two. (Check before you make plans though as Hurricane Sandy meant it was shut for a while.) Had a wander up the Empire State Building as well, just looking at the board listing the companies that inhabit the place is mind blowing.

Keep your eyes peeled while you're there as well, whilst in a taxi driving down 5th ave, a bloke in a Hull FC shirt jogged past us.
Made my day! :D

          NO BUTS IT'S GOT TO BE BUTTER......                                 Z1N2MybzplQR6XBrwB9egniMH8xqYQ5s.jpg                                                                                                                     


#22 High Peak Rhino

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:07 PM

Spent a lot of time in New York over the last couple of years.
It is a great city to walk around, especially the Lower East Side, but there is plenty all over.
For a bit of history then try the tenement museum, you have to book tours but they were very interesting.
Walk the high line (old railway track now a footpath)
Also do the main sites - Empire State, Statue of Liberty (free views if you take the Staten Island Ferry). If you want to get views of the Empire State then go up to the Top of the Rock (Rockerfeller Centre) - one at night, one during the day.
I can recommend many bars but my favourite is the Pony Bar in Hells Kitchen. Always 20 American Craft beers on tap and a great place to spend an early evening at.

#23 timtum

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 07:08 PM

That reminds me. You will need to apply for one of these -

https://esta.cbp.dhs.gov/esta/

It costs about a tenner. Don't use a site saying they will do it for you as they charge for something that is easy.


Thanks for that! Transit via San Francisco on my way back from Brisbane and it seems I need one of those things.
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#24 marklaspalmas

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 07:21 PM

New York is a brilliant city. I love it. Been three times. Loads to see and do, museums, parks, galleries. Great food. Nice people.

Never been to Washington.

You robbed a bank L'Ang or what? I?ll text you the Fev v Leigh scores if you miss the game.

 

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#25 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 12:02 AM

New York is a brilliant city. I love it. Been three times. Loads to see and do, museums, parks, galleries. Great food. Nice people.

Never been to Washington.

You robbed a bank L'Ang or what? I?ll text you the Fev v Leigh scores if you miss the game.




thanks Mark

no banks robbed, just a lifetime of graft, and don't take this the wrong way, but I don't give a flying fart about Featherstone Rovers..

Edited by l'angelo mysterioso, 04 January 2013 - 10:30 AM.

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#26 marklaspalmas

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 10:38 AM

thanks Mark

no banks robbed, just a lifetime of graft, and don't take this the wrong way, but I don't give a flying fart about Featherstone Rovers..


Nice, you'll have a great time. I love the architecture there. Perhaps because it's been the scene of so much film & TV over the years I found it a very photogenic place. Took loads of B&W shots.



You know what they say though, once a capper........ ;)

 

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#27 Garvers

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 11:48 AM

DC's a government town, so don’t expect New York. But it’s the government town, so it still has a buzz if you like that kind of thing.

There are almost too many great museums etc to take in, but you can’t go far wrong with the Air & Space, and the Museum of American History is pretty good too – it has the original star-spangled banner, which is incredible – and the Newseum, which is a relative newcomer.

You’ll probably end up doing Georgetown – which is classic WASP/politico Washington - and maybe Adams Morgan (check out The Black Squirrel on 18th St for beer) and Dupont Circle. Go for weekend brunch at Kramerbooks’ Afterwords cafe, just off Dupont – it’s far from the best brunch in the city, but it’s a DC institution (and you get to browse in a great bookstore while you wait for a table). Kramerbooks also has a separate bar, with some great beers. Nothing like going out to buy a book and getting drunk at the same time.

The 14th Street corridor is an increasingly good area at the moment - north of Thomas Circle, up to U Street. It’s a big stretch of road, heading north. It used to be a real skid row area, but the whole Logan Circile neighbourhood is changing now, with shops, restaurants, cafes etc. If you like craft beers, there’s an excellent place on 14th Street called Churchkey – an upstairs bar, with American bar food. It gets busy, but it’s got a great selection. There’s also a higher-end restaurant on the ground floor called Birch & Barley. If you can grab a booth at Churchkey, you’re sorted for the night. I also like Masa further up on 14th Street – it’s a fashionable hangout (Obama staffers and younger republicans), bit pricey, but excellent food and good atmosphere.

U Street is changing too – there’s some good places up there now, though they might be a touch ‘hip’ for your tastes. But if you like to hang out in black areas and not just white areas, then U Street is the most famous strip, despite going through some very tough times since the race riots in the 60s. The most famous place to visit is Ben’s Chili Bowl – it’s DC’s most famous black restaurant, and a campaign stop-off. The original Busboys & Poets is also at 14th & V, just up from U Street. Also The Gibson on 14th, near U Street, for a late night speakeasy bar (owned by the Thievery Corporation guys).

For music, I’m guessing somewhere like Blues Alley in Georgetown would probably suit you, just off the main drag M Street. The sad thing about DC is that the city’s authentic and unique black sound - go-go music – is so hard for whites/tourists to track down. But if you do get the chance, check it out - go-go is a live experience, and there’s nothing like a three-hour non-stop go-go bomb being dropped.

The most tiring thing about DC is getting around. You might find it too cold at the moment, but the bikeshare scheme is absolutely fantastic in a place like DC – US cities are so easy to navigate, and bike riding is much, much less scary than in the UK. The bikes are easily the best way of seeing DC in a limited time – getting to places like Georgetown which aren’t on the Metro, and especially getting around the Mall (which is much further to walk than most tourists imagine). Just make sure you re-dock within the thirty minute window and pick up a new bike if you want to go further, or it will start to charge extra. If you really want to be a tourist there are Segway tours of the Mall for those who don’t like walking too much.

And you'll enjoy the train the NYC - if you're a fan of The Wire you'll get to see the infamous row houses in Baltimore....


#28 Garvers

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 11:49 AM

DC's a government town, so don’t expect New York. But it’s the government town, so it still has a buzz if you like that kind of thing.

There are almost too many great museums etc to take in, but you can’t go far wrong with the Air & Space, and the Museum of American History is pretty good too – it has the original star-spangled banner, which is incredible – and the Newseum, which is a relative newcomer.

You’ll probably end up doing Georgetown – which is classic WASP/politico Washington - and maybe Adams Morgan (check out The Black Squirrel on 18th St for beer) and Dupont Circle. Go for weekend brunch at Kramerbooks’ Afterwords cafe, just off Dupont – it’s far from the best brunch in the city, but it’s a DC institution (and you get to browse in a great bookstore while you wait for a table). Kramerbooks also has a separate bar, with some great beers. Nothing like going out to buy a book and getting drunk at the same time.

The 14th Street corridor is an increasingly good area at the moment - north of Thomas Circle, up to U Street. It’s a big stretch of road, heading north. It used to be a real skid row area, but the whole Logan Circile neighbourhood is changing now, with shops, restaurants, cafes etc. If you like craft beers, there’s an excellent place on 14th Street called Churchkey – an upstairs bar, with American bar food. It gets busy, but it’s got a great selection. There’s also a higher-end restaurant on the ground floor called Birch & Barley. If you can grab a booth at Churchkey, you’re sorted for the night. I also like Masa further up on 14th Street – it’s a fashionable hangout (Obama staffers and younger republicans), bit pricey, but excellent food and good atmosphere.

U Street is changing too – there’s some good places up there now, though they might be a touch ‘hip’ for your tastes. But if you like to hang out in black areas and not just white areas, then U Street is the most famous strip, despite going through some very tough times since the race riots in the 60s. The most famous place to visit is Ben’s Chili Bowl – it’s DC’s most famous black restaurant, and a campaign stop-off. The original Busboys & Poets is also at 14th & V, just up from U Street. Also The Gibson on 14th, near U Street, for a late night speakeasy bar (owned by the Thievery Corporation guys).

For music, I’m guessing somewhere like Blues Alley in Georgetown would probably suit you, just off the main drag M Street. The sad thing about DC is that the city’s authentic and unique black sound - go-go music – is so hard for whites/tourists to track down. But if you do get the chance, check it out - go-go is a live experience, and there’s nothing like a three-hour non-stop go-go bomb being dropped.

The most tiring thing about DC is getting around. You might find it too cold at the moment, but the bikeshare scheme is absolutely fantastic in a place like DC – US cities are so easy to navigate, and bike riding is much, much less scary than in the UK. The bikes are easily the best way of seeing DC in a limited time – getting to places like Georgetown which aren’t on the Metro, and especially getting around the Mall (which is much further to walk than most tourists imagine). Just make sure you re-dock within the thirty minute window and pick up a new bike if you want to go further, or it will start to charge extra. If you really want to be a tourist there are Segway tours of the Mall for those who don’t like walking too much.

And you'll enjoy the train the NYC - if you're a fan of The Wire you'll get to see the infamous row houses in Baltimore....




#29 Mumby Magic

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 03:20 PM

All I'll say is enjoy................... B)

Lilly, Jacob and Isaac, what my life is about. Although our route through life is not how it should be, I am a blessed man.


#30 Futtocks

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 03:48 PM

The sad thing about DC is that the city’s authentic and unique black sound - go-go music – is so hard for whites/tourists to track down. But if you do get the chance, check it out - go-go is a live experience, and there’s nothing like a three-hour non-stop go-go bomb being dropped.</span></span>


Hmm... the mental image of Chris frugging maniacally at a full-on Go-Go session. :D

A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#31 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 07:01 PM

DC's a government town, so don’t expect New York. But it’s the government town, so it still has a buzz if you like that kind of thing.

There are almost too many great museums etc to take in, but you can’t go far wrong with the Air & Space, and the Museum of American History is pretty good too – it has the original star-spangled banner, which is incredible – and the Newseum, which is a relative newcomer.

You’ll probably end up doing Georgetown – which is classic WASP/politico Washington - and maybe Adams Morgan (check out The Black Squirrel on 18th St for beer) and Dupont Circle. Go for weekend brunch at Kramerbooks’ Afterwords cafe, just off Dupont – it’s far from the best brunch in the city, but it’s a DC institution (and you get to browse in a great bookstore while you wait for a table). Kramerbooks also has a separate bar, with some great beers. Nothing like going out to buy a book and getting drunk at the same time.

The 14th Street corridor is an increasingly good area at the moment - north of Thomas Circle, up to U Street. It’s a big stretch of road, heading north. It used to be a real skid row area, but the whole Logan Circile neighbourhood is changing now, with shops, restaurants, cafes etc. If you like craft beers, there’s an excellent place on 14th Street called Churchkey – an upstairs bar, with American bar food. It gets busy, but it’s got a great selection. There’s also a higher-end restaurant on the ground floor called Birch & Barley. If you can grab a booth at Churchkey, you’re sorted for the night. I also like Masa further up on 14th Street – it’s a fashionable hangout (Obama staffers and younger republicans), bit pricey, but excellent food and good atmosphere.

U Street is changing too – there’s some good places up there now, though they might be a touch ‘hip’ for your tastes. But if you like to hang out in black areas and not just white areas, then U Street is the most famous strip, despite going through some very tough times since the race riots in the 60s. The most famous place to visit is Ben’s Chili Bowl – it’s DC’s most famous black restaurant, and a campaign stop-off. The original Busboys & Poets is also at 14th & V, just up from U Street. Also The Gibson on 14th, near U Street, for a late night speakeasy bar (owned by the Thievery Corporation guys).

For music, I’m guessing somewhere like Blues Alley in Georgetown would probably suit you, just off the main drag M Street. The sad thing about DC is that the city’s authentic and unique black sound - go-go music – is so hard for whites/tourists to track down. But if you do get the chance, check it out - go-go is a live experience, and there’s nothing like a three-hour non-stop go-go bomb being dropped.

The most tiring thing about DC is getting around. You might find it too cold at the moment, but the bikeshare scheme is absolutely fantastic in a place like DC – US cities are so easy to navigate, and bike riding is much, much less scary than in the UK. The bikes are easily the best way of seeing DC in a limited time – getting to places like Georgetown which aren’t on the Metro, and especially getting around the Mall (which is much further to walk than most tourists imagine). Just make sure you re-dock within the thirty minute window and pick up a new bike if you want to go further, or it will start to charge extra. If you really want to be a tourist there are Segway tours of the Mall for those who don’t like walking too much.

And you'll enjoy the train the NYC - if you're a fan of The Wire you'll get to see the infamous row houses in Baltimore....


superb I'll be checking out loads of those destinations.
thanks cw
WELCOME TO THE ROYSTON VASEY SUPER LEAGUE 2015
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#32 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 07:02 PM

Hmm... the mental image of Chris frugging maniacally at a full-on Go-Go session. :D


you haven't lived if you haven't seen my shapes
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#33 fieldofclothofgold

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 08:14 PM

Philadelphia,Reading terminal market for a Philly Steak and home made Amish food.In South Philly they really do talk like Rocky.The Art museum is well worth a visit too,its not just paintings its lots of other artifacts too it ha an armouries and the architectural section is brilliant.In the old town the constitution centre is good,but Betsy Ross's house is funny they a queueing up for tours and there are 100s of houses like that in the Burley area of Leeds

Edited by fieldofclothofgold, 04 January 2013 - 08:30 PM.

but you and I weve been through that and this is not our fate.
So let us so let us not talk falsely now.
The hour is getting late
FROM 2004,TO DO WHAT THIS CLUB HAS DONE,IF THATS NOT GREATNESSTHEN i DONT KNOW WHAT IS.

JAMIE PEACOCK

#34 Northern Sol

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 01:59 PM

Tried to get into the US A twice now. Been refused a visa both times, apparently due to political affiliations, my mum said the only way I would get into America would be to either travel to Cuba, and try and get refugee status (or I could do a Felix Baumgartner & parachute in)


How could they possibly know of your political affiliations unless you wrote "by the way I'm a dirty commie" on your application form?

Edited by Northern Sol, 07 January 2013 - 01:59 PM.


#35 fieldofclothofgold

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 03:21 PM

How could they possibly know of your political affiliations unless you wrote "by the way I'm a dirty commie" on your application form?

How did it go in the Macarthy witch hunts for un american activities? "I am not now nor have I ever been a member of the communist party"
but you and I weve been through that and this is not our fate.
So let us so let us not talk falsely now.
The hour is getting late
FROM 2004,TO DO WHAT THIS CLUB HAS DONE,IF THATS NOT GREATNESSTHEN i DONT KNOW WHAT IS.

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#36 Old Frightful

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 04:55 PM

How could they possibly know of your political affiliations unless you wrote "by the way I'm a dirty commie" on your application form?

The lad I visited in America applied for his visa at the same time as a work colleague working at the same company as him in the UK. Despite my pal having a better degree, his colleague was granted a visa well before him. The reason for his delay was because he was a member of the Labour party. Can't give you any more specific details but I remember him telling me this as fact.

          NO BUTS IT'S GOT TO BE BUTTER......                                 Z1N2MybzplQR6XBrwB9egniMH8xqYQ5s.jpg                                                                                                                     


#37 Wolford6

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 07:29 PM

a.k.a Tommy Robinson of the EDL

:wacko:

At least the system works.

http://www.dailymail...ssport-U-S.html

Under Scrutiny by the Right-On Thought Police


#38 Northern Sol

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 08:47 PM

How did it go in the Macarthy witch hunts for un american activities? "I am not now nor have I ever been a member of the communist party"


What kind of idiot would answer "Yes, that's me!"?

#39 Northern Sol

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 08:49 PM

The lad I visited in America applied for his visa at the same time as a work colleague working at the same company as him in the UK. Despite my pal having a better degree, his colleague was granted a visa well before him. The reason for his delay was because he was a member of the Labour party. Can't give you any more specific details but I remember him telling me this as fact.


How could they possibly know that he was a Labour party member?

#40 gingerjon

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:51 AM

What kind of idiot would answer "Yes, that's me!"?

How could they possibly know that he was a Labour party member?


People do get successfully blocked from travelling to certain countries. It's not actually that hard to believe that it happens.
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