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Summat for the oldies


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#1 grumpyoldram

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 12:55 PM

Mention of mucky dripping in the other post made me think of this - found on that fangled tinternet.

EATING IN THE UK IN THE FIFTIES
* Pasta had not been invented.
* Curry was a surname.
* Olive oil was kept in the medicine cabinet
* Spices came from the Middle East where they were used
for embalming
* A takeaway was a mathematical problem.
* A pizza was something to do with a leaning tower.
* Bananas and oranges only appeared at Christmas time.
* The only vegetables known to us were spuds, peas,
carrots and cabbage,
* All crisps were plain; the only choice we had was
whether to put the salt on or not.
* Condiments consisted of salt, pepper, vinegar and
brown sauce if we were lucky.
* Soft drinks were called pop.
* Coke was something that we put on the fire.
* A Chinese chippy was a foreign carpenter.
* A Big Mac was what we wore when it was raining.
* A Pizza Hut was an Italian shed.
* Brown bread was something only poor people ate.
* Oil was for lubricating, fat was for cooking
* Bread and jam was a treat.
* Tea was made in a teapot using tea leaves and never green.
* Coffee was Camp, and came in a bottle.
* Cubed sugar was regarded as posh.
* Figs and dates appeared every Christmas, but no one
ever ate them.
* Coconuts only appeared when the fair came to town.
* Hors d'oeuvre was a spelling mistake.
* The starter was our main meal. Soup was a main meal.
* Only Heinz made beans.
* Leftovers went in the dog.
* Special food for dogs and cats was unheard of.
* Fish was only eaten on Fridays.
* Fish didn't have fingers in those days.
* Eating raw fish was called poverty, not sushi.
* Ready meals only came from the fish and chip shop.
* For the best taste fish and chips had to be eaten out
of old newspapers.
* Frozen food was called ice cream.
* Nothing ever went off in the fridge because we never had one.
* None of us had ever heard of yoghurt.
* Healthy food consisted of anything edible.
* People who didn't peel potatoes were regarded as lazy.
* Indian restaurants were only found in India .
* Eating outside was a picnic.
* Cooking outside was called camping.
* Seaweed was not a recognised food.
* Pancakes were only eaten on Pancake Tuesday
* "Kebab" was not even a word never mind a food.
* Cornflakes had arrived from America but it was obvious
they would never catch on.
* The phrase "boil in the bag" would have been beyond
comprehension.
* The idea of "oven chips" would not have made any sense
at all to us.
* The world had not heard of Pot Noodles, Instant Mash
and Pop Tarts.
* Lettuce and tomatoes in winter were only found abroad.
* Prunes were medicinal.
* Surprisingly muesli was readily available in those
days, it was called cattle feed.
* Pineapples came in chunks in a tin; we had only ever
seen a picture of a real one.
* We thought that Baguettes were a problem the French
needed to deal with.
* Garlic was used to ward off vampires, but never used
to flavour food.
* Water came out of the tap, if someone had suggested
bottling it and charging more than petrol for it they would have
become a laughing stock.
* Food hygiene was all about washing your hands before meals.
* The one thing that we never ever had on our table in
the fifties .... elbows.


#2 keighley

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 02:00 PM

Mention of mucky dripping in the other post made me think of this - found on that fangled tinternet.

EATING IN THE UK IN THE FIFTIES
* Pasta had not been invented.
* Curry was a surname.
* Olive oil was kept in the medicine cabinet
* Spices came from the Middle East where they were used
for embalming
* A takeaway was a mathematical problem.
* A pizza was something to do with a leaning tower.
* Bananas and oranges only appeared at Christmas time.
* The only vegetables known to us were spuds, peas,
carrots and cabbage,
* All crisps were plain; the only choice we had was
whether to put the salt on or not.
* Condiments consisted of salt, pepper, vinegar and
brown sauce if we were lucky.
* Soft drinks were called pop.
* Coke was something that we put on the fire.
* A Chinese chippy was a foreign carpenter.
* A Big Mac was what we wore when it was raining.
* A Pizza Hut was an Italian shed.
* Brown bread was something only poor people ate.
* Oil was for lubricating, fat was for cooking
* Bread and jam was a treat.
* Tea was made in a teapot using tea leaves and never green.
* Coffee was Camp, and came in a bottle.
* Cubed sugar was regarded as posh.
* Figs and dates appeared every Christmas, but no one
ever ate them.
* Coconuts only appeared when the fair came to town.
* Hors d'oeuvre was a spelling mistake.
* The starter was our main meal. Soup was a main meal.
* Only Heinz made beans.
* Leftovers went in the dog.
* Special food for dogs and cats was unheard of.
* Fish was only eaten on Fridays.
* Fish didn't have fingers in those days.
* Eating raw fish was called poverty, not sushi.
* Ready meals only came from the fish and chip shop.
* For the best taste fish and chips had to be eaten out
of old newspapers.
* Frozen food was called ice cream.
* Nothing ever went off in the fridge because we never had one.
* None of us had ever heard of yoghurt.
* Healthy food consisted of anything edible.
* People who didn't peel potatoes were regarded as lazy.
* Indian restaurants were only found in India .
* Eating outside was a picnic.
* Cooking outside was called camping.
* Seaweed was not a recognised food.
* Pancakes were only eaten on Pancake Tuesday
* "Kebab" was not even a word never mind a food.
* Cornflakes had arrived from America but it was obvious
they would never catch on.
* The phrase "boil in the bag" would have been beyond
comprehension.
* The idea of "oven chips" would not have made any sense
at all to us.
* The world had not heard of Pot Noodles, Instant Mash
and Pop Tarts.
* Lettuce and tomatoes in winter were only found abroad.
* Prunes were medicinal.
* Surprisingly muesli was readily available in those
days, it was called cattle feed.
* Pineapples came in chunks in a tin; we had only ever
seen a picture of a real one.
* We thought that Baguettes were a problem the French
needed to deal with.
* Garlic was used to ward off vampires, but never used
to flavour food.
* Water came out of the tap, if someone had suggested
bottling it and charging more than petrol for it they would have
become a laughing stock.
* Food hygiene was all about washing your hands before meals.
* The one thing that we never ever had on our table in
the fifties .... elbows.


Thanks for that, as an ol unmmyself, it brought back memories and made me guffaw.

#3 Blind side johnny

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 02:13 PM

Sigh! And we wondered why we were so thin.

Remember when having chops meant one each - you only had two sausages at a time too.

You'd buy 2oz of sweets at a time and they'd last for days (maybe).

No-one had a fruit bowl.


But were we happy? Not really in my case - it was bloody miserable most of the time in the 50's.

:)
Believe what you see, don't see what you believe.


John Ray (1627 - 1705)

#4 Piggy's mate

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 06:46 PM

We ad a fruit bowl but we didnt keep fruit in it and the only time we ad any fruit was wen we went apple nicking from a neighbours tree! And that meant we all got stomach ache!

Now where did I leave that pointy thing that bloke Damocles gave me, I've work to do!


 

BATLEY BULLDOGS RLFC :bb:


#5 Bi11

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 09:35 PM

Aye, and Chippies were carpenters; chips (or finerks) came from t' fish 'oil.

#6 funkmaster flex

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 09:46 PM

Brilliant!

Living life and loving every second

http://www.summerhol.com


#7 Spanish Knight

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 10:12 PM

We ad a fruit bowl but we didnt keep fruit in it and the only time we ad any fruit was wen we went apple nicking from a neighbours tree! And that meant we all got stomach ache!


We must have been posh because we had fruit even when no one was ill. :rolleyes:

#8 mahtsalleh

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 12:55 AM

Like it. and..
-Condensed milk was a sandwich constituent
-Chips were not computer components and were called a "penn'orth" (because they cost 1/240th of a pound)
-Four-letter words were never used in the presence of the fairer sex
-Muggings were people who were taken advantage of
-Telephones were in a large red box and had two buttons
-Televisions were the toys of the aristocracy and programme didn't start until around tea-time, and the vertical hold was always dodgy
-'Buses had a red-indian chief's head on the bonnet and took 30 minutes to get up the Leeds's road cutting
-Supermarkets were called "Co-ops"
-Tumbledryers had two rollers and a handle
-Old Mother Riley starred at the Empire
-DVD probably had something to do with unclean sexual habits and wasn't ever discussed.
-Unmarried mother's were dispatched to maiden aunts in the country for their confinement
-The Prime Minister always smoked either a cigar (Tory) or a pipe (Labour) and cigarette smoking was "cool".
-A juicer was a bowl wth a lump in the middle
-Dan Dare and Desparate Dan were every boy's hero
-If you had a garden the hut therein was an adapted air raid shelter
-Wellies were black not green
-Sex education was limited to playground rumours and some vague perception that you needed both birds and bees to make it happen
-You were not allowed to have an accident unless you were wearing clean underpants
-Rice was only served as a dessert (which was actually a pudding) baked in milk and sugar with nutmed grated on the top, and for some reason it was not possible to consume it unless you had first eaten all your "greens",
-You only had a home theatre if your father was manager of the Playhouse.
-You called your Maths Master "sir" not "Frank"
-Your headmaster was fully authorized to use a piece of bamboo on your posterior if you broke some rules, and if you complained to your father about it, you got the buckle of his belt in the same spot because "you must have done something wrong" in the first place.
-A calculator was some strange (if occasionally unreliable) process of your own brain

I could, as, I guess, could many others, go on. Perhaps it's the "rose coloured spectactles" syndrome, but somehow things were simpler back then. Or perhaps it's that you had so few material things that you better appreciated what you had?
Oh, and something like 5,000 people would turn up to watch a local derby with "the gallant youths".

#9 grumpyoldram

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 10:10 AM

Like it. and..
-Condensed milk was a sandwich constituent
-Chips were not computer components and were called a "penn'orth" (because they cost 1/240th of a pound)
-Four-letter words were never used in the presence of the fairer sex
-Muggings were people who were taken advantage of
-Telephones were in a large red box and had two buttons
-Televisions were the toys of the aristocracy and programme didn't start until around tea-time, and the vertical hold was always dodgy
-'Buses had a red-indian chief's head on the bonnet and took 30 minutes to get up the Leeds's road cutting
-Supermarkets were called "Co-ops"
-Tumbledryers had two rollers and a handle
-Old Mother Riley starred at the Empire
-DVD probably had something to do with unclean sexual habits and wasn't ever discussed.
-Unmarried mother's were dispatched to maiden aunts in the country for their confinement
-The Prime Minister always smoked either a cigar (Tory) or a pipe (Labour) and cigarette smoking was "cool".
-A juicer was a bowl wth a lump in the middle
-Dan Dare and Desparate Dan were every boy's hero
-If you had a garden the hut therein was an adapted air raid shelter
-Wellies were black not green
-Sex education was limited to playground rumours and some vague perception that you needed both birds and bees to make it happen
-You were not allowed to have an accident unless you were wearing clean underpants
-Rice was only served as a dessert (which was actually a pudding) baked in milk and sugar with nutmed grated on the top, and for some reason it was not possible to consume it unless you had first eaten all your "greens",
-You only had a home theatre if your father was manager of the Playhouse.
-You called your Maths Master "sir" not "Frank"
-Your headmaster was fully authorized to use a piece of bamboo on your posterior if you broke some rules, and if you complained to your father about it, you got the buckle of his belt in the same spot because "you must have done something wrong" in the first place.
-A calculator was some strange (if occasionally unreliable) process of your own brain

I could, as, I guess, could many others, go on. Perhaps it's the "rose coloured spectactles" syndrome, but somehow things were simpler back then. Or perhaps it's that you had so few material things that you better appreciated what you had?
Oh, and something like 5,000 people would turn up to watch a local derby with "the gallant youths".


'Buses had a red-indian chief's head on the bonnet and took 30 minutes to get up the Leeds's road cutting

Did you have many red indians in your neck of the woods then mahtsalleh ? :o

Sigh! And we wondered why we were so thin.

Remember when having chops meant one each - you only had two sausages at a time too.

You'd buy 2oz of sweets at a time and they'd last for days (maybe).

No-one had a fruit bowl.


But were we happy? Not really in my case - it was bloody miserable most of the time in the 50's.

:)


Aye - tell the kids today that and they don't believe you. :rolleyes:

#10 Blind side johnny

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 11:36 AM

Like it. and..
-Condensed milk was a sandwich constituent
-Chips were not computer components and were called a "penn'orth" (because they cost 1/240th of a pound)
-Four-letter words were never used in the presence of the fairer sex
-Muggings were people who were taken advantage of
-Telephones were in a large red box and had two buttons
-Televisions were the toys of the aristocracy and programme didn't start until around tea-time, and the vertical hold was always dodgy
-'Buses had a red-indian chief's head on the bonnet and took 30 minutes to get up the Leeds's road cutting
-Supermarkets were called "Co-ops"
-Tumbledryers had two rollers and a handle
-Old Mother Riley starred at the Empire
-DVD probably had something to do with unclean sexual habits and wasn't ever discussed.
-Unmarried mother's were dispatched to maiden aunts in the country for their confinement
-The Prime Minister always smoked either a cigar (Tory) or a pipe (Labour) and cigarette smoking was "cool".
-A juicer was a bowl wth a lump in the middle
-Dan Dare and Desparate Dan were every boy's hero
-If you had a garden the hut therein was an adapted air raid shelter
-Wellies were black not green
-Sex education was limited to playground rumours and some vague perception that you needed both birds and bees to make it happen
-You were not allowed to have an accident unless you were wearing clean underpants
-Rice was only served as a dessert (which was actually a pudding) baked in milk and sugar with nutmed grated on the top, and for some reason it was not possible to consume it unless you had first eaten all your "greens",
-You only had a home theatre if your father was manager of the Playhouse.
-You called your Maths Master "sir" not "Frank"
-Your headmaster was fully authorized to use a piece of bamboo on your posterior if you broke some rules, and if you complained to your father about it, you got the buckle of his belt in the same spot because "you must have done something wrong" in the first place.
-A calculator was some strange (if occasionally unreliable) process of your own brain

I could, as, I guess, could many others, go on. Perhaps it's the "rose coloured spectactles" syndrome, but somehow things were simpler back then. Or perhaps it's that you had so few material things that you better appreciated what you had?
Oh, and something like 5,000 people would turn up to watch a local derby with "the gallant youths".



And between 1954 and 58 Dewsbury were bottom or next to bottom every season and averaged only 2500 spectators, which was considered very poor (average in 1950 was 6300, and we made a loss).

Happy days eh?
Believe what you see, don't see what you believe.


John Ray (1627 - 1705)

#11 Crown Flatter

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 12:37 PM

My grandma had a fruit bowl with real fruit in it, but we weren't allowed to touch it.

We all loved mucky fat (dripping was only used in cooking, but was probably the same thing). Also enjoyed tomato sauce or treacle sandwiches and even had crisp sandwiches.

I saved some of my spend (pocket money) until I had enough for a Mars bar (it cost 6d then).

In those days I went to all the home games with my dad and we got a lift with his friend in a Ford Prefect (reg. ECH 735 - originally a Derby registration) with trafficators. Membership Card cost 10/- and at 'A' team games we sat in the press box in Section C of the stand. This part of the stand was for Patrons only and I could only sit in Sections A or B (the ends).
Legs, Dews, Legs.

#12 mahtsalleh

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:04 AM

But then in 1972-3, some (mainly) local lads, including such as a couple of unrelated Stephensons, the Bates brothers, Dick Lowe and the much under-rated John Clark, without having been exposed to the benefits of Big Macs or Chicken Nuggets, or even Lean Cuisine, finished eighth in the Championship, (which meant all away ties in the play off ) and then showed Leeds at Odsal what team spirit could really do.
Now THOSE were the days!

PS : The Heavy Wollen District Transport Company had a fleet of GUY 'buses (with the red indian chief's head on the bonnet) before they splashed out on some new Leylands, which made it up Leeds cutting in a startling 20 minutes. (unless it was raining I would walk up, but that was well before my sciatica took hold. Come to think of it those were the days as well, but that's an entirely different can of worms which is best left unopened).

#13 grumpyoldram

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:29 AM

But then in 1972-3, some (mainly) local lads, including such as a couple of unrelated Stephensons, the Bates brothers, Dick Lowe and the much under-rated John Clark, without having been exposed to the benefits of Big Macs or Chicken Nuggets, or even Lean Cuisine, finished eighth in the Championship, (which meant all away ties in the play off ) and then showed Leeds at Odsal what team spirit could really do.
Now THOSE were the days!

PS : The Heavy Wollen District Transport Company had a fleet of GUY 'buses (with the red indian chief's head on the bonnet) before they splashed out on some new Leylands, which made it up Leeds cutting in a startling 20 minutes. (unless it was raining I would walk up, but that was well before my sciatica took hold. Come to think of it those were the days as well, but that's an entirely different can of worms which is best left unopened



new Leylands

Tazzers ? (not really a bus annorak, but you knew these things when you were a kid) :rolleyes:

#14 RunItOffAfi

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:36 PM

You actually got one home game in the first round, against us (Oldham), and beat us 29-14. I remember leaving the ground at the end and saying to this old guy "see you at Odsal in May". His response was "I don't think so", but I'd spotted something special in your team and thought they were at least a good bet to reach the final. And I was there at Odsal in May and was chuffed for your team and supporters. How times have changed for both our clubs.

Edited by RunItOffAfi, 14 January 2013 - 04:36 PM.


#15 Crown Flatter

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 01:17 PM

But then in 1972-3, some (mainly) local lads, including such as a couple of unrelated Stephensons, the Bates brothers, Dick Lowe and the much under-rated John Clark, without having been exposed to the benefits of Big Macs or Chicken Nuggets, or even Lean Cuisine, finished eighth in the Championship, (which meant all away ties in the play off ) and then showed Leeds at Odsal what team spirit could really do.
Now THOSE were the days!

PS : The Heavy Wollen District Transport Company had a fleet of GUY 'buses (with the red indian chief's head on the bonnet) before they splashed out on some new Leylands, which made it up Leeds cutting in a startling 20 minutes. (unless it was raining I would walk up, but that was well before my sciatica took hold. Come to think of it those were the days as well, but that's an entirely different can of worms which is best left unopened).



The Yorkshire Woollen Transport Co Ltd did certainly operate Guys (Arab was the model, even if Guy Motors Ltd had a Red Indian chief (we could call themthat in those days) as their logo). They were built in the 1940s, rebodied by Roe's of Leeds in the early '50s and soldiered on until about 1973. I remember going to the Mount (we could call it that then) one snowy Christmas Day (we had them in those days), got as far Track Road and had to get off and walk up that hill to let the bus climb it.

The new Leylands came in 1962, followed by Leyland badged Albion Lowlanders in 1964. these were the precursor to the low floor bused we have today, with just one step in. The down side was that you had to climb a mountain to sit on the side and rear seats and the driver sat way up high.
Legs, Dews, Legs.

#16 STEVE P

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 02:27 PM

But then in 1972-3, some (mainly) local lads, including such as a couple of unrelated Stephensons, the Bates brothers, Dick Lowe and the much under-rated John Clark, without having been exposed to the benefits of Big Macs or Chicken Nuggets, or even Lean Cuisine, finished eighth in the Championship, (which meant all away ties in the play off ) and then showed Leeds at Odsal what team spirit could really do.
Now THOSE were the days!

PS : The Heavy Wollen District Transport Company had a fleet of GUY 'buses (with the red indian chief's head on the bonnet) before they splashed out on some new Leylands, which made it up Leeds cutting in a startling 20 minutes. (unless it was raining I would walk up, but that was well before my sciatica took hold. Come to think of it those were the days as well, but that's an entirely different can of worms which is best left unopened).


Your comment about the Stephensons being unrelated made me smile. I don't know how many times Eddie Waring mentions it in his commentary on the '73 Final, but it must be going on for a huggin. (There's a word not many people still use)
If you didn't know that the 2 Stivvies were 'no relation' to one another before Eddie got cracking the old boy certainly leaves you in no doubt by the time he's finished.

#17 Bi11

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 09:17 AM

The Yorkshire Woollen Transport Co Ltd did certainly operate Guys (Arab was the model, even if Guy Motors Ltd had a Red Indian chief (we could call themthat in those days) as their logo). They were built in the 1940s, rebodied by Roe's of Leeds in the early '50s and soldiered on until about 1973. I remember going to the Mount (we could call it that then) one snowy Christmas Day (we had them in those days), got as far Track Road and had to get off and walk up that hill to let the bus climb it.

The new Leylands came in 1962, followed by Leyland badged Albion Lowlanders in 1964. these were the precursor to the low floor bused we have today, with just one step in. The down side was that you had to climb a mountain to sit on the side and rear seats and the driver sat way up high.

There was one bus type which had a large, round mesh covered heater upstairs at the front of the bus. If you placed your foot firmly in the middle of said heater the engine would make a sudden and rather alarming moaning noise. Even a well behaved kid like myself couldn't resist doing this a time or two. It was followed,of course, by the conductor bellowing up the stairs and threatening all kinds of retribution.

No doubt some transport fan out there will be able to name the type of bus.

Edited by Bi11, 19 January 2013 - 04:31 PM.


#18 EQUALIZER

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 09:30 PM

The Yorkshire Woollen Transport Co Ltd did certainly operate Guys (Arab was the model, even if Guy Motors Ltd had a Red Indian chief (we could call themthat in those days) as their logo). They were built in the 1940s, rebodied by Roe's of Leeds in the early '50s and soldiered on until about 1973. I remember going to the Mount (we could call it that then) one snowy Christmas Day (we had them in those days), got as far Track Road and had to get off and walk up that hill to let the bus climb it.

The new Leylands came in 1962, followed by Leyland badged Albion Lowlanders in 1964. these were the precursor to the low floor bused we have today, with just one step in. The down side was that you had to climb a mountain to sit on the side and rear seats and the driver sat way up high.

Was on the same bus.Us that got off last managed to get back on.Felt guilty about it ever since.Glad ive been able to clear my guilt after all these years.To those that had to walk a 1000s tough.




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