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The Meaning of Liff


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#1 Futtocks

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 11:20 AM

For those of us who remember this wonderful book of useful words, created by Douglas Adams and John Lloyd, Radio 4 are broadcasting a 30th anniversary (cf 'Signs you are getting old' thread!) programme about it, tomorrow at 11:30am.

Official blurb: This year marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of The Meaning of Liff, by John Lloyd and Douglas Adams. This funny and well-loved dictionary uses placenames as new definitions for common experiences which we all know and recognize, but for which no words exist.

John Lloyd talks to Matt Lucas about his love of Liff, and also gathers new entries from the Radio 4 audience. These are then chewed over and sifted down by John and fellow Liff-lovers Sanjeev Bhaskar, Helen Fielding and Terry Jones.

And Professor Steven Pinker - Liff devotee - talks about the psychological relief and sense of bonding that comes from recognising that you're not alone in having these thoughts and feelings.

Between the optimist & the pessimist
The difference is quite droll:
The optimist sees the doughnut,
The pessimist sees the hole.


#2 Padge

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 12:48 PM

One of my favourites is :

Hagnaby : Someone who looked a lot more attractive in the disco than they do in your bed the next morning.

Edited by Padge, 27 February 2013 - 12:49 PM.


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#3 Futtocks

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 12:50 PM

Last night, before I heard about this programme, I was going through the bookshelf, looking for something to read on the train. My copy of 'The Meaning of Liff' was there - I thought I'd lost it ages ago! :)

Between the optimist & the pessimist
The difference is quite droll:
The optimist sees the doughnut,
The pessimist sees the hole.


#4 Ex-Kirkholt

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 01:03 PM

My favourite was Scrabster - something like "A dog that has it off on your leg".

It seemed to fit perfectly with the name - I've never been to the place so cannot comment about it !
Looks like it wer' organised by't Pennine League

#5 Futtocks

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 01:18 PM

A few favourites :D

Scethrog: One of those peculiar beards-without-moustaches worn by religious Belgians and American scientists which help them look like trolls.

Pant-y-wacco (adj.): The final state of mind of retired colonel before they come to take him away.

Caarnduncan (n.): The high-pitched and insistent cry of the young male human urging one of its peer group to do something dangerous on a cliff-edge or piece of toxic waste ground.

Writtle (vb.): Of a steel ball, to settle into a hole.

Between the optimist & the pessimist
The difference is quite droll:
The optimist sees the doughnut,
The pessimist sees the hole.