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I've done a deal with the NFU!


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#1 JohnM

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 06:29 PM

I have told them I am as fully committed to buying British beef as they are to buying British tractors, trucks, combines, 4x4s and cars.


and yes, we do make ALL of those things in the UK.

#2 hindle xiii

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 06:41 PM

I wonder if this commitment by Tesco to buy more British meat will just cause another situation similar to the British Dairy Farmers.

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#3 Severus

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 08:25 PM

The problem with farmers is they are the first to moan when times are hard but don't mind raking it in when the goings good.

Edited by Severus, 27 February 2013 - 08:25 PM.

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#4 WearyRhino

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 08:38 PM

The NFU is the Tory Party in green wellies.

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#5 gingerjon

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 08:38 PM

The problem with farmers is they are the first to moan when times are hard but don't mind raking it in when the goings good.


So farmers are normal people, then?
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#6 shaun mc

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 09:06 PM

Tesco have already hinted that it will mean more expensive meat. They will not have their margins eroded - its either the farmer who takes less income or the customer who pays more I'm afraid.

The NFU as an insurance company were brilliant at the time of the Cockermouth floods in 2009. Many shopkeepers were with the NFU, so they got people in and blitzed it, and got claims sorted without fuss at a very traumatic time.

BTW the supply chain of a tractor is far different to that of a pork chop!

#7 Wolford6

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 09:31 PM

David Brown Tractors were brilliant machines. Probably employed 500 people in Meltham.

Bought out by yanks who allegedly were only interested in acquiring the rights to the engine and gearbox.

Production moved elsewhere.
<_<

Bradford also had a huge International Harvester tractor factory.
Nowadays it's the site of a Morrisons supermarket.
<_<

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#8 JohnM

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 09:47 PM

DBT weren't that brilliant or they would have survived. JCB employs over 10,000 people and has a huge UK production capability. http://agriculture.j...l-Tractors.aspx

Although New Holland is Fiat-owned, New Holland’s Basildon plant, which produces the 112 to 228 hp award-winning T6 and T7 tractor ranges, has been honoured no fewer than three times at one of Britain’s most prestigious manufacturing awards. Not only did it take the World Class Manufacturing Award and the Manufacturing in Action Award, but it was also runner up for the most prestigious prize of the evening: the British Manufacturer of the Year Award.

#9 JohnM

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 09:53 PM

Tesco have already hinted that it will mean more expensive meat. They will not have their margins eroded - its either the farmer who takes less income or the customer who pays more I'm afraid.

The NFU as an insurance company were brilliant at the time of the Cockermouth floods in 2009. Many shopkeepers were with the NFU, so they got people in and blitzed it, and got claims sorted without fuss at a very traumatic time.

BTW the supply chain of a tractor is far different to that of a pork chop!


BTW the supply chain of a tractor is far different to that of a pork chop!

Yes. much more complex. Engines made in Peterborough, radiators made in Turkey, electronics made in China, tyres made in South Korea, China and Hungary, all assembled in Illinois and shipped here.

As for margins. Tesco have an operating profit margin of 6%. Would farmers settle such a low figure? Don't think so.

Now, turning to E.Coli , farmers and local butchers.....

Edited by JohnM, 27 February 2013 - 09:58 PM.


#10 Severus

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:03 PM

So farmers are normal people, then?

That's the thing with food, we need it to survive.
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#11 Marauder

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:49 PM

DBT weren't that brilliant or they would have survived. JCB employs over 10,000 people and has a huge UK production capability. http://agriculture.j...l-Tractors.aspx

Although New Holland is Fiat-owned, New Holland’s Basildon plant, which produces the 112 to 228 hp award-winning T6 and T7 tractor ranges, has been honoured no fewer than three times at one of Britain’s most prestigious manufacturing awards. Not only did it take the World Class Manufacturing Award and the Manufacturing in Action Award, but it was also runner up for the most prestigious prize of the evening: the British Manufacturer of the Year Award.

Arn't JCB planning on moving production abroad?
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#12 Wolford6

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 12:17 AM

David Brown tractors were brilliant. They weren't the cheapest and they always had a long waiting list. They were one of the first manufacturers of four-wheel drive tractors.

As for David Brown himself ... he was a brilliant engineer who lost his focus. He was once described to me by one of his workers as an industrial George Best.

In the 1980's it was pretty hard to run two major Huddersfield businesses from Monte Carlo.

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#13 JohnM

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:04 AM

Arn't JCB planning on moving production abroad?


No. They already have plants in 22 countries. They have made a huge investment in India to serve that market. My point really is that there misconceptions about the size and quality of the manufacturing segment in the UK.

#14 Bostik Bailey

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:36 AM

What will probably happen is that the current small sacle produces of good quaility meat will be approached to supply the supermarkets. These producers will currently be suppling the local butchers/sell direct via farmer markets farm shops etc.
  • The supermarkets will approach small suppliers and be very accommodating and possibly help out with logistics etc
  • The supermarkets will pay over the odds for the meat - but pass this onto their customers
  • The farmers will say yippieee
  • The local bucthers/farmers markets will struggle to survive due to a reduction on availablity of their products
  • Once the local outlets have ceased trading, the supermarkets will realise they are now the only outlet for the meat, and start to squeaze prices
  • The farmer will start to moan, but where can they sell the meat now when the only outlet is a big supermarket
It happened before with other food products, but since BSE Mad Cow etc a profitable niche opened up with people wanting to by via a small supply chain, the suppermarkets will soon see this off.

#15 shaun mc

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:56 PM

BTW the supply chain of a tractor is far different to that of a pork chop!

Yes. much more complex. Engines made in Peterborough, radiators made in Turkey, electronics made in China, tyres made in South Korea, China and Hungary, all assembled in Illinois and shipped here.

As for margins. Tesco have an operating profit margin of 6%. Would farmers settle such a low figure? Don't think so.

Now, turning to E.Coli , farmers and local butchers.....


I'm sure the dairy farmers who have to sell their milk at a price to Tesco at a price lower than their cost of production would be quite happy to have a 6% margin.
I know of at least 4 local butchers who are far cheaper than the local supermarkets, and their meat is of a better quality. Now either the butchers are quite happy with lower margins, given that they will be sourcing their products from higher cost sources or a supermarket is making a much better margin.
And yes, I'd agree that farmers are quite happy to take margins when they can, but those occasions are becoming harder to come by. UK farming is the most regulated and quality-driven in the world and so it should be. That does not come cheap.

#16 JohnM

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:51 PM

"sell their milk at a price to Tesco at a price lower than their cost of production"
are they mad? why do they do it then? Maybe they should try Waitrose or the Co-op.

"at least 4 local butchers who are far cheaper than the local supermarkets"
Consecutive posts from mumsnet. see http://www.mumsnet.c...et/AllOnOnePage
One local butchers is - but it's all cheap (and imported!) meat - nothing more than a glorified meat supermarker really (and I think it's closing soon as I saw the building up for sale recently.......) The other one is much more expensive, even getting just what I need it's out of my price braccket,

storminabuttercupThu 10-Mar-11 10:16:03
Mine is hit and miss. Have you tried the butchers counters in the supermarket? Tesco often have some good deals on in that bit and it seems better quality.

nagynolonger Thu 10-Mar-11 10:19:06
I would say it costs more from a local butcher. But mine does do good freezer pack at a reasonable price. Also you can buy exactly what you want as others have said. Things like sausage and bacon are much better than supermarket ones.

Overall, if farmers can't make a living, they should do something else instead. As I said in post #1 " I am as fully committed to buying British beef as they are to buying British tractors, trucks, combines, 4x4s and cars".

Edited by JohnM, 28 February 2013 - 10:51 PM.


#17 Ex-Kirkholt

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:58 PM

I know of at least 4 local butchers who are far cheaper than the local supermarkets, and their meat is of a better quality. Now either the butchers are quite happy with lower margins, given that they will be sourcing their products from higher cost sources or a supermarket is making a much better margin.

I don't know of one local butcher who is cheaper than a supermarket never mind "far" cheaper.
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#18 Griff9of13

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 02:15 PM

I don't know of one local butcher who is cheaper than a supermarket never mind "far" cheaper.


That would depend on what supermarket price point you compare against; against 'value' products they will be nowhere near, but against their 'finest' or counter range they will come close if not better than the supermarket.
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#19 stimpo-and-kat

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 03:32 PM

My local meat wholesaler (abbatoir with sales counter) is very reasonable. £1.40 a pound for sausages. £8 for 5 pound of bacon. £1.70 a pound for stewing steak etc. Lamb Henry's £2.50!

#20 shaun mc

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 08:08 PM

Standard chicken breast fillets in supermarket (one of the big 4 ) nearest to work £10.95 per kilo. I was shocked at the price. Not finest, nor free range nor value range.

4 butchers selling local chicken (as they have the suppliers of their meat on a board in the shop) - range between £7.99 per kilo (I call that far cheaper) and £9.99 per kilo. However mumsnet must be right.

None of the butchers around here stock any imported meat. The countryside is full of it so why should they.

Local greengrocer sells a brand of local eggs for £1.19 per dozen. Supermarket, stocks the exact same brand that can be as high as £1.85!




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