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Can Comedians Survive?

In the Twitter age

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#61 Alfies Thumb

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 03:43 AM

And now I'm looking forward to checking out a few acts at the Melbourne Comedy Festival later this month :-)


Have fun! Also, try and see some lesser known acts rather than the big names. I've had some fantastic surprises in the past.

#62 West Country Eagle

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 10:20 AM

I agree with what others have said. Comedy is all about the delivery and timing, as well as those jokes you get on the night (ie. responding to hecklers, taking the ###### out of someone in the audience).

Music is changing and for the better IMO. It is now very easy to distribute music and monetise your work without having to get the backing of a record company. Services such as youtube and spotify allow people to easily discover new music and Amazon, iTunes etc. make it easy to sell. Radiohead earned more from In Rainbows than they had from any of their previous albums.


Slightly off topic (sort of), but I was chatting to an outspoken, mildly successful producer of electronic music last night, and he went off on one about the way the music industry has changed. I'm all for democratising music and allowing anyone with creative flair to get their music out there (I've pressed up records myself in the past, and it's not as daunting as people might think), but he has a point when he says that it can be hard to find brilliant music because of all the "noise". There was once a time when you would read NME and other music papers/mags to find out what was happening and discover new music. For all their faults, these magazines helped to steer the agenda. Now, with many millions of blogs, online reviews sites etc, you don't need them. Yet with more music out there than ever, we do. In the days when I was a staffer at a music magazine, one of my jobs was deciding what to cover and what to review. That was a difficult enough task then with a more structured music industry. Now, it would be near impossible without spending 12 hours a day listening to new music - and even then you'd start losing the will to live quite quickly, due to the amount of mediocre, soundalike fluff. The greatest obscure music will always find an audience, but it's not as easy as it once was.

He also moaned about the standards of music journalism dropping, but that's a different argument.
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#63 Severus

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 11:58 AM

Slightly off topic (sort of), but I was chatting to an outspoken, mildly successful producer of electronic music last night, and he went off on one about the way the music industry has changed. I'm all for democratising music and allowing anyone with creative flair to get their music out there (I've pressed up records myself in the past, and it's not as daunting as people might think), but he has a point when he says that it can be hard to find brilliant music because of all the "noise". There was once a time when you would read NME and other music papers/mags to find out what was happening and discover new music. For all their faults, these magazines helped to steer the agenda. Now, with many millions of blogs, online reviews sites etc, you don't need them. Yet with more music out there than ever, we do. In the days when I was a staffer at a music magazine, one of my jobs was deciding what to cover and what to review. That was a difficult enough task then with a more structured music industry. Now, it would be near impossible without spending 12 hours a day listening to new music - and even then you'd start losing the will to live quite quickly, due to the amount of mediocre, soundalike fluff. The greatest obscure music will always find an audience, but it's not as easy as it once was.

He also moaned about the standards of music journalism dropping, but that's a different argument.

Sounds like people against any change are those who have most to lose or are seeing there way of doing things becoming obsolete. The internet isn't going to be uninvented so the music industry must change with it.

I agree with you about the signal to noise ratio. In the future I think we're less likely to see a small number of artists become huge as opposed to lots of artists getting their chance in the limelight.
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#64 Futtocks

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 12:41 PM

In the future I think we're less likely to see a small number of artists become huge as opposed to lots of artists getting their chance in the limelight.


Get your CDs in the supermarkets and you're made. Same with books. Unfortunately, it appears you have to fall beneath a certain quality requirement in order to do so. :P

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#65 Matt J

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 04:53 PM

If Mrs Browns Boys can fill concert halls then comedy should have no problems.

Cummins Out.


#66 hindle xiii

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 07:40 PM

If Mrs Browns Boys can fill concert halls then comedy should have no problems.

:lol: :lol:

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#67 Severus

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 09:25 PM

If Mrs Browns Boys can fill concert halls then comedy should have no problems.

Saw the Christmas special. Really didn't see what the fuss is about. Comedy has moved on from the 70s/80s.
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#68 Matt J

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 02:59 AM

Its the worst comedy show Ive ever seen... atleast Whitney is sort of fit!

I hear my parents howling and I just dont get it? Is it cause its a bloke in a dress and swearing is funnier in an Irish accent?

Another thing, just because they share a nationality, doesn't mean its the same level, so if anybody compares it to Father Ted they deserve a slap upside the head.

Cummins Out.





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