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The Mallard


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47 replies to this topic

#41 Ullman

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 02:19 PM

I have a friend who was a stoker. His brother was the driver and they always worked as a team.  When British Railways switched to diesel engines, he wopuld have loved to have become a driver but the drivers' union was against upgrading "labourers".

 

BR re-trained him as a wagon driver.

That sounds a little odd to me. The vast majority of drivers and firemen were in the same union, ASLEF. Why would the union want to block the promotion of its own members? The natural progression was from fireman to driver, which was the route my dad took after starting on the railways at 14 as a 'lad porter' (that was his official job title) on Driffield station.


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#42 Wolford6

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 02:25 PM

I'm only repeating what he told me. Perhaps, there were fewer drivers needed on the change from steam to diesel.

 

He started off driving one of these.

 

pch-1960-scammell-scarab-lorry-br.jpg


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#43 Griff9of13

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 03:28 PM

I'm only repeating what he told me. Perhaps, there were fewer drivers needed on the change from steam to diesel.

 

He started off driving one of these.

 

pch-1960-scammell-scarab-lorry-br.jpg

 

I remember them, there was a depot up the road from where I lived in Chorley.

 

I must be old. :( 


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#44 D9000

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 04:04 PM

Artic-lorry? Them things were called 'mechanical horses' when I were a lad. And yes, we are old.



#45 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 05:13 PM

Artic-lorry? Them things were called 'mechanical horses' when I were a lad. And yes, we are old.

they really were that as well

the point being thast horses were more manoueverable than vans and they needed something to get where horses could get. Just about every station had at least one.


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#46 Trojan

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 10:00 AM

Only the British could design and build such a superb loco..

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.and have the coal shovelled in by hand as Mallard races along at over 100 mph when it would have been quite simple to have a mechanical system to do it. If there's a hard way to do something, we'll find it!!

 

It's true that Mallard and her sisters were a superby British design. It's also true that Gresley (the designer) was very heavily influenced by Chapeleon the French designer. The locomotives were basically mofified A3 class machines (Flying Scotsman)  These were originally introuduced by the GN Railway in 1921 as A1 class.  When the first of these "Great Northern" was exhibted at the Wembley exhibition alongside a GWR King class the GWR were claiming their loco was more powerful.  Gresley arranged to borrow one - and yes they were more powerful.  He modified the A1's with larger boilers and better steam passages.  These modified A1's became class A3 - and subseqent design modifications resulted in the A4 - of which Mallard, Union of South Africa, Dominion of Canada, Dwight D Eisenhower, Bittern, and Sir Nigel Gresley are the surviving examples. IMO the steamlined shape owed more to the LNER's marketing dept than to any engineering necessity.  They can all currently  be seen at the NRM.

As for the Princess Coronation locomotives of the LMS, they were more powerful than the A4, but unfortunately the LMS lacked the long downhill straights that can be found on the East Coast Main Line.  One of these held the record of 114 MPH, but this was achieved on the downhill stretch to Crewe station.  The train was still doing 70mph when it hit the curves outside the station. Apparently much of the crockery in the dining car was smashed, fortunately that was the sum of the damage.


"Your a one trick pony Trojan" - Parksider 10th March 2013

#47 Trojan

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 10:04 AM

I'm only repeating what he told me. Perhaps, there were fewer drivers needed on the change from steam to diesel.

 

He started off driving one of these.

 

pch-1960-scammell-scarab-lorry-br.jpg

 

I saw one last week at a forties fair at Heywood.


"Your a one trick pony Trojan" - Parksider 10th March 2013

#48 Ullman

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 12:50 PM

Artic-lorry? Them things were called 'mechanical horses' when I were a lad. And yes, we are old.

I thought I was but I don't remember them.


"I own up. I am a serial risk taker. I live in a flood zone, cycle without a helmet, drink alcohol and on Sunday I had bacon for breakfast."





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