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Royal baby


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#41 ShotgunGold

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 05:16 PM

I too like the Royals, generally because they add an extra layer of "identity" to this country in an era where all countries are politically and economically and even culturally starting to look all the bloody same (the era of Americanisation sorry Americanization)

 

I enjoyed the Diamond Jubilee celebrations a lot; the Wedding less so.

 

However this was a complete non-event and painful to watch. I was watching on ITV and I'm pretty sure one of the reporters said something like "this is one of the most magical moments of my life." when they finally left the hospital.

 

Furthermore I cannot believe that Kate was up the duff for 9 months and could not make a decision on the name. For the first few weeks of his life this baby could well be nameless. Lazy parenting already!


Edited by ShotgunGold, 24 July 2013 - 05:17 PM.


#42 Shadow

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 05:22 PM

 

Furthermore I cannot believe that Kate was up the duff for 9 months and could not make a decision on the name. For the first few weeks of his life this baby could well be nameless. Lazy parenting already!

We should help them choose.

Following on from Mock the Week last week where they suggested Girls names that would go well with the title "Queen" and suggested "Latifa" and "'S Greatest Hits" can I propose one of the following:

 

's of Leon

Kong

Dom of Loathing

Ston Upon Hull (or Upon Thames for a more upmarket sound)

Size

Burger


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#43 T-Dub

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 06:26 PM

Furthermore I cannot believe that Kate was up the duff for 9 months and could not make a decision on the name. For the first few weeks of his life this baby could well be nameless.

 

I think thats a case of the parents, given their recent tribulations with snooping paparazzi, making the press play to their rules and wait

Its something they can be in control of



#44 gingerjon

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 08:41 PM

 Americanization

 

The 'z' is a perfectly acceptable British English spelling.  Same as with organize, recognize, etc.


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#45 Methven Hornet

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 09:01 PM

The 'z' is a perfectly acceptable British English spelling.  Same as with organize, recognize, etc.

 

Iz it?


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#46 Methven Hornet

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 09:12 PM

We should help them choose.

Following on from Mock the Week last week where they suggested Girls names that would go well with the title "Queen" and suggested "Latifa" and "'S Greatest Hits" can I propose one of the following:

 

's of Leon

Kong

Dom of Loathing

Ston Upon Hull (or Upon Thames for a more upmarket sound)

Size

Burger

 

Ussie


"There are now more pandas in Scotland than Tory MPs."

#47 gingerjon

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 05:54 AM

Iz it?

 

 

Iz it?

 

Yez.


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#48 Bostik Bailey

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 06:16 AM

Another bleeding tax dodging scrounger added to the ranks.


Don't worry the bedroom tax should ensure that their income is reduced

#49 Gary Coyle

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 08:35 AM

Don't worry the bedroom tax should ensure that their income is reduced

Nope, not paid on  "homes of the realm"



#50 Wolford6

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 09:53 AM

Since 1284 there have been 23 x Princes of Wales,who were also Princes of Cornwall.

 

German names? .... check

French names?  ..... check

English names? ..... check

Greek names? ......  check

Current Prince meeting one or more of these criteria? ...     check

Heir Presumptive meeting one or more of these criteria? ... check

New baby meeting one or more of these criteria? ...             check

 

How many have had celtic names?

Sweet #### none.


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#51 gingerjon

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 12:58 PM

Since 1284 there have been 23 x Princes of Wales,who were also Princes of Cornwall.

 

German names? .... check

French names?  ..... check

English names? ..... check

Greek names? ......  check

Current Prince meeting one or more of these criteria? ...     check

Heir Presumptive meeting one or more of these criteria? ... check

New baby meeting one or more of these criteria? ...             check

 

How many have had celtic names?

Sweet #### none.

That's because they have absolutely nothing to do with the Celts other than to rule over them. 

 

They've also never had an Ethelred.


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#52 ckn

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:13 PM

Iz it?

Yes.  We were taught this in school that American English is more traditional in keeping the Z for some things, especially ize endings rather than ise.  The ise endings and other uses of s instead of z are relatively modern in language terms, i.e. after 1900.  Both are technically correct in modern spelling but we have standardised on ise where the Americans have standardized on ize.  Some words are now fully ise in both language variants when it used to be ize, for example the word enterprize was in use until the late 1700s, e.g. HMS Enterprize, but has slowly changed into enterprise.

 

Our English teacher did say that she wished we still had Shakespearean rules on English where you could spell as you saw fit as long as people could understand what you were writing.  Well ahead of her time, imagine the head implosions of all the grammar and spelling pedants if that were the case!


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#53 archibald

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:21 PM

 

They've also never had an Ethelred.

That's because he wasn't ready. 

#54 gingerjon

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:25 PM

Yes.  We were taught this in school that American English is more traditional in keeping the Z for some things, especially ize endings rather than ise.  The ise endings and other uses of s instead of z are relatively modern in language terms, i.e. after 1900.  Both are technically correct in modern spelling but we have standardised on ise where the Americans have standardized on ize.  Some words are now fully ise in both language variants when it used to be ize, for example the word enterprize was in use until the late 1700s, e.g. HMS Enterprize, but has slowly changed into enterprise.

 

Our English teacher did say that she wished we still had Shakespearean rules on English where you could spell as you saw fit as long as people could understand what you were writing.  Well ahead of her time, imagine the head implosions of all the grammar and spelling pedants if that were the case!

 

http://en.wikipedia....Oxford_spelling


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#55 Martyn Sadler

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:31 PM

Our English teacher did say that she wished we still had Shakespearean rules on English where you could spell as you saw fit as long as people could understand what you were writing.  Well ahead of her time, imagine the head implosions of all the grammar and spelling pedants if that were the case!

The trouble is that if you spell according to your own rules, people almost certainly won't be able to understand what you mean.

 

I had a very good English teacher at school who, after we objected collectively about pedantic grammatical rules, set us an interesting exercise. He wrote a sentence on the blackboard and then pointed out that the sentence could have as many as 25 different meanings, depending on how it was punctuated.

 

He offered a carrot by promising that the pupil who could uncover the largest number of meanings would be exempt from doing the next English homework.

 

I remember it well, because I won the competition.

 

Anything to avoid doing homework!

 

But since then I've been fairly sceptical about people who suggest we shouldn't be worried about abandoning grammatical rules in writing English.



#56 ckn

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:38 PM

The trouble is that if you spell according to your own rules, people almost certainly won't be able to understand what you mean.

 

I had a very good English teacher at school who, after we objected collectively about pedantic grammatical rules, set us an interesting exercise. He wrote a sentence on the blackboard and then pointed out that the sentence could have as many as 25 different meanings, depending on how it was punctuated.

 

He offered a carrot by promising that the pupil who could uncover the largest number of meanings would be exempt from doing the next English homework.

 

I remember it well, because I won the competition.

 

Anything to avoid doing homework!

 

But since then I've been fairly sceptical about people who suggest we shouldn't be worried about abandoning grammatical rules in writing English.

For me, there's a difference between grammar and spelling.  Does it matter if I misspell a word as long as it's readable and not generally capable of having another meaning?  Grammar is important as that's what makes sentences readable despite spelling errors.


Arguing with the forum trolls is like playing chess with a pigeon.  No matter how good you are, the bird will **** on the board and strut around like it won anyway


#57 hindle xiii

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:43 PM

The trouble is that if you spell according to your own rules, people almost certainly won't be able to understand what you mean.

 

I had a very good English teacher at school who, after we objected collectively about pedantic grammatical rules, set us an interesting exercise. He wrote a sentence on the blackboard and then pointed out that the sentence could have as many as 25 different meanings, depending on how it was punctuated.

 

He offered a carrot by promising that the pupil who could uncover the largest number of meanings would be exempt from doing the next English homework.

 

I remember it well, because I won the competition.

 

Anything to avoid doing homework!

 

But since then I've been fairly sceptical about people who suggest we shouldn't be worried about abandoning grammatical rules in writing English.

I thought the bit in bold was the sentence with 25 different meanings!

 

:sclerosis:


On Odsal Top baht 'at.


#58 Martyn Sadler

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:48 PM

For me, there's a difference between grammar and spelling.  Does it matter if I misspell a word as long as it's readable and not generally capable of having another meaning?  Grammar is important as that's what makes sentences readable despite spelling errors.

Spelling evolves over time. Who is to say whether some common words will be spelled (or spelt) differently in 50 years' time?

 

But the spelling of some groups of words with very different meanings could be quite similar, apart from the odd letter.

 

The writer may think the meaning is clear, but the reader might not.



#59 ckn

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:53 PM

Spelling evolves over time. Who is to say whether some common words will be spelled (or spelt) differently in 50 years' time?
 
But the spelling of some groups of words with very different meanings could be quite similar, apart from the odd letter.
 
The writer may think the meaning is clear, but the reader might not.

The original version of A Midsummer Night's Dream.
 
The version tidied up for modern English

Both versions quite readable by me, despite the original dating from 390 years ago, as long as I concentrate.


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#60 Methven Hornet

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 02:48 PM

Yes.  We were taught this in school that American English is more traditional in keeping the Z for some things, especially ize endings rather than ise.  The ise endings and other uses of s instead of z are relatively modern in language terms, i.e. after 1900.  Both are technically correct in modern spelling but we have standardised on ise where the Americans have standardized on ize.  Some words are now fully ise in both language variants when it used to be ize, for example the word enterprize was in use until the late 1700s, e.g. HMS Enterprize, but has slowly changed into enterprise.

 

Our English teacher did say that she wished we still had Shakespearean rules on English where you could spell as you saw fit as long as people could understand what you were writing.  Well ahead of her time, imagine the head implosions of all the grammar and spelling pedants if that were the case!

 

Thank you for that, quite interesting!


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