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Rugby League World Issue 400 - Out Now!

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Michael Foot Centenary


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#81 Ackroman

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:37 PM

I get no sick pay (other than SSP) if absent from work. If someone knows you are off for genuine reasons, then its up to their discretion and they will possibly pay you. This situation was brought about by people abusing the previous system where you got 2 weeks sick pay every year and some people took it every single year without fail.


I'm self employed so I pray to God I don't get ill!

#82 Griff9of13

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:48 PM

There are other ways of managing sickness absences other than the 'big stick' approach of withdrawing the benefit. The company I work for pay 100% of wages for the first 6 months absence and then 85% for the next 4.5 years after that (subject to a 6 month probationary period, and for long term obvious medical criteria ). Sickness absence is still relatively low as absences are managed using the Bradford Factor in conjunction with an in-house sickness absence policy.


"it is a well known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it."

#83 Johnoco

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:53 PM

There are other ways of managing sickness absences other than the 'big stick' approach of withdrawing the benefit. The company I work for pay 100% of wages for the first 6 months absence and then 85% for the next 4.5 years after that (subject to a 6 month probationary period, and for long term obvious medical criteria ). Sickness absence is still relatively low as absences are managed using the Bradford Factor in conjunction with an in-house sickness absence policy.

My partner works for HMRC. They have similar sick pay and I can tell you that there are many totally abusing it. Off on full pay for months with totally minor ailments. It's pretty scandalous


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No cause for so much hatred, I'm just a different man

Pull off that cover, I will too, and learn to understand

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#84 archibald

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 12:55 PM

 

Sickness absence is still relatively low as absences are managed using the Bradford Factor in conjunction with an in-house sickness absence policy.

That's the system we use. It stops the Friday/Monday sickness quite well. Long term absence doesn't accrue points. 

#85 Griff9of13

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 01:29 PM

My partner works for HMRC. They have similar sick pay and I can tell you that there are many totally abusing it. Off on full pay for months with totally minor ailments. It's pretty scandalous

 

I think it is down to how well it is managed. If I was to be off with something pretty minor for any length of time questions would be asked believe me. Like I said, we have a pretty strict policy in place, the Bradford Factor is only one part of it.


"it is a well known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it."

#86 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 03:10 PM

Michael Foot, the former leader of the Labour Party, was born on 23 July 1913. He would have been 100 years old today.
 
Foot was probably the last leader of a major political party in this country who didn't modify his style to take account of modern media coverage.
 
That was probably why he was good to watch and to listen to, although his political naiveté saw him lead Labour to a massive defeat in 1983.
 
But politics seemed a more vital and exciting activity in those days, before modern spin doctors got their hands on it.


Wasn't Bernard Ingham the epitome of the spin doctor?
And wasnt thatcher completely reinvented including the timbre of her voice by the Tory publicity department?
As I remember she was contemporaneous with foot

Foot was a fine writer and orator but not much of a politician
Healey should have got the job
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#87 Trojan

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 02:50 PM

Thatcher, ingham, Saatchi, Bell invented spin to sell Thatcher.  Everything that followed by both parties was a reaction. Attlee would never have won an election today, despite the fact that he's (IMO) the greatest PM of the 20th century (even Norman Tebbitt said something to that effect on R4 the other day) Instead we get lightweights like Cameron, Osborne, Blair, and possibly Milliband leading our country.  Churchill was in his mid sixties when he became PM for the first time and he led us sucessfully through a war! In fact he was almost exactly the age I am now.  I think I might give it a go! :sleep:


Edited by Trojan, 27 July 2013 - 02:53 PM.

"Your a one trick pony Trojan" - Parksider 10th March 2013

#88 Griff9of13

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 08:30 AM

Thatcher, ingham, Saatchi, Bell invented spin to sell Thatcher. Everything that followed by both parties was a reaction. Attlee would never have won an election today, despite the fact that he's (IMO) the greatest PM of the 20th century (even Norman Tebbitt said something to that effect on R4 the other day) Instead we get lightweights like Cameron, Osborne, Blair, and possibly Milliband leading our country. Churchill was in his mid sixties when he became PM for the first time and he led us sucessfully through a war! In fact he was almost exactly the age I am now. I think I might give it a go! :sleep:


I listened to that program as well. It was very interesting to discoverer the high regard Tebbit had for the Attlee government as a whole. Went some way to changing my opinion of the bloke.
"it is a well known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it."




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