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Anyone visited or lived in remote parts of the world?


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#21 JohnM

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:18 PM

I live four miles south of Mablethorpe.....remote in time and space.



#22 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:28 PM

i lived in little plum stead in norfolk for a couple of years

 

you would think it boring surrounded by miles and miles of farm land right to the horizon in every direction but it was beautiful

brilliant skyscapes

I would walk miles in all weathers and come upon beautiful little medieval churches

there was one bus a day in and out of norwich and you made the most of it not many people had cars


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#23 Larry the Leit

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 04:31 AM

Villages/towns in Northern Thailand, very much off the beaten track. Still a very basic existence, where the sight of a white man still caused a considerable stir. That was ten years ago though, it's probably changed a bit now, no electricity or running water, but a very friendly place. Hard going if you don't speak any Thai, which I didn't.

#24 Northern Sol

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 06:05 PM

There are parts of Bangkok where people will literally follow you around because they've (presumably) never seen anyone white before. You don't need to go to Northern Thailand for that.



#25 Larry the Leit

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 06:21 PM

There are parts of Bangkok where people will literally follow you around because they've (presumably) never seen anyone white before. You don't need to go to Northern Thailand for that.


Or because they are poor and can spot a soft touch.....

#26 Northern Sol

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 06:27 PM

Or because they are poor and can spot a soft touch.....

Nope. Nobody asked me for any money.



#27 Steve May

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 08:29 AM

I love a bit of isolation.  Given no responsibilities I'd live miles from anywhere if I could.

 

In Aussie terms it's probably not isolated, but I recently drove from Berri to Adelaide in the middle of the night on my own.  After an hour or so I pulled over at a rest stop to take a break and got out of the car.     Dead quiet, no other traffic on the road, millions of stars in the sky.  Just beautiful.  It was a pity to get back underway.


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#28 Steve May

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 08:36 AM

I was supposed to visit Spurn Point again. That's pretty remote.

 

I love Spurn Point.

 

I was down there a couple of months ago and it was quite windy, so very quiet - probably only 10 people or so out there walking.   An F15 flew over, low and fast, and then came back and did a series of further fast passes and steep climbs.  The pilot was clearly showing off a bit.   He entertained us for about 20 minutes before he flew off, presumably to Lakenheath.

 

Fantastic stuff.


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#29 gingerjon

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 09:20 AM

I've made it to Skaw - most northerly point of the Shetland Islands where anyone lives - and spent the day on Papa Stour, population 16 and falling.


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#30 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 09:36 AM

I've made it to Skaw - most northerly point of the Shetland Islands where anyone lives - and spent the day on Papa Stour, population 16 and falling.

I think Unst is further north


Edited by l'angelo mysterioso, 31 July 2013 - 09:40 AM.

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#31 Saint Billinge

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 11:17 AM

My nephew once journeyed the full length of South America as a tour guide, but always mindful of bandits. The pay was peanuts but very, very generous tips from people able to afford these expensive adventures. 

 

Walking the Pennine Way many years ago, it did seem remote in places. 

 

Anyone been walking on Dartmoor or other similar terrain? 



#32 Wolford6

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 04:06 PM

Fifty years ago, when I was a small child, I had three uncles and an aunt who all lived in an old farmhouse on top of the hill that overlooked our village. The farm had no electricity or running water. They lit the house with oil lamps and, when necessary, collected spring water that emerged from the slope just below the house. 

 

In the snows of 1963, one of my uncles died and the Co-op funeral department  could not get a vehicle up to the farm to collect the body. They then made a large wooden sledge and dragged his coffin to the farm.  His body was dragged down the hill to my grandparents house at the foot of the hill. It stayed there for a good few days before the funeral.

 

My remaining two uncles then sold the sheep and moved into the village. Within weeks, vandals burnt the farm down. The ruins still remain.

 

Garndiffaith%20-%20Graig%20Ddu%20Farm%20


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#33 Saint Billinge

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 04:51 PM

Fifty years ago, when I was a small child, I had three uncles and an aunt who all lived in an old farmhouse on top of the hill that overlooked our village. The farm had no electricity or running water. They lit the house with oil lamps and, when necessary, collected spring water that emerged from the slope just below the house. 

 

In the snows of 1963, one of my uncles died and the Co-op funeral department  could not get a vehicle up to the farm to collect the body. They then made a large wooden sledge and dragged his coffin to the farm.  His body was dragged down the hill to my grandparents house at the foot of the hill. It stayed there for a good few days before the funeral.

 

My remaining two uncles then sold the sheep and moved into the village. Within weeks, vandals burnt the farm down. The ruins still remain.

 

Garndiffaith%20-%20Graig%20Ddu%20Farm%20

 

That is some story.



#34 gingerjon

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 04:55 PM

I think Unst is further north


Skaw is on Unst.
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#35 Old Frightful

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 10:44 PM

Nope. Nobody asked me for any money.

Did they remember you from the last time you were there?


          NO BUTS IT'S GOT TO BE BUTTER......                                 Z1N2MybzplQR6XBrwB9egniMH8xqYQ5s.jpg                                                                                                                     


#36 GeordieSaint

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 09:27 AM

Two areas that are fairly wild and unvisited in the UK are Torridon in Northwest Scotland and Otterburn/Kielder in Northumberland; both beautiful and remote locations.

 

Work-wise, I have had the pleasure of Afghanistan and the hell-hole that was Sangin. If there was no people (both locals and military forces), it has the potential to be a paradise but sadly it isn't. Also been to some remote areas in Kenya, which were pretty desolate and hardly anything lives in the Darfur Mountains in Oman. However, the wildest place I have ever been in South Georgia. I managed to get out on a Naval patrol during my recent tour to the South Atlantic and it was a wild and treachrous journey on the Southern Ocean but very much worth it to visit Shackleton's grave at Gritvyken and go climbing in the surrounding mountains. The Falklands was pretty remote and spectacular too; I'd live there if it was closer to the UK.

 

During my recent post-tour leave, I went climbing in the Himalayas. I climbed Mera and Island Peak in Nepal trekking through some very remote valleys; the poverty and sense of isolation was rife. Nepalis are a very hardy bunch. Southeast Iceland is pretty remote but stunning too as is inner-Sweden; did a winter dog sledding trek around the Osterstund wilderness in 2009. Amazing!

 

My next wilderness trip is hopefully climbing a 7000m peak in the Karakoram Mountains in Pakistan (2015 hopefully). Not sure I'll get clearance with the recent killings by fundamentalists on Nanga Parbat in Jun (?) but will try to get there.


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#37 ckn

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 09:39 AM

Two areas that are fairly wild and unvisited in the UK are Torridon in Northwest Scotland and Otterburn/Kielder in Northumberland; both beautiful and remote locations.

I've only ever been at or through Otterburn once when it wasn't raining.  On that day I was convinced the world was going to end.  I logically separate the Otterburn and Kielder areas to disassociate from my army days on exercise at Otterburn!

 

I do love the peace and tranquility at Kielder, it's much like the peace you get in the more remote parts of the Scottish highlands.

 

On that, a backpack, tent and no more than an hour's walk from many of the towns and villages near the Trossachs and you're in areas where you'd swear that no human has ever been.  Pitch on a wood edge near a stream and the world just goes away for a few days.  Unfortunately, the Loch Lomond area is more congested these days, you get far too many groups of kids ruining it by exploiting the wild camping laws in Scotland and treating it as a party zone where they can make as much noise and leave as much litter as they see fit.  I recently went to Callander and walked north north east for a wee bit, the steep hill and lack of infrastructure at the start keeps away those just out for no good and then you're into the wilderness.  Next year, I'll probably go for a bit longer.


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#38 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 12:32 PM

Skaw is on Unst.

Yes it is
I don't know what came over me
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#39 GeordieSaint

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 11:28 AM

On that, a backpack, tent and no more than an hour's walk from many of the towns and villages near the Trossachs and you're in areas where you'd swear that no human has ever been.  Pitch on a wood edge near a stream and the world just goes away for a few days.  Unfortunately, the Loch Lomond area is more congested these days, you get far too many groups of kids ruining it by exploiting the wild camping laws in Scotland and treating it as a party zone where they can make as much noise and leave as much litter as they see fit.  I recently went to Callander and walked north north east for a wee bit, the steep hill and lack of infrastructure at the start keeps away those just out for no good and then you're into the wilderness.  Next year, I'll probably go for a bit longer.

 

I actually don't know the Loch Lomond area too well, probably due to the reasons you state. I do love it around Torridon, which is pretty remote and spectacular. I went up there in Feb this year whilst on R&R. The mountains were covered in snow so the crampons and ice-axe were put to good use, ideal prep for my Himalayan trip in April. I might try and get myself on a winter mountaineering AT course at Ballachulish next winter to get some time done in the Glen Coe area (not really explored). The Glen Shiel area looks spectacular as a secluded area well away from much human contact too.


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#40 Futtocks

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 11:37 AM

I actually don't know the Loch Lomond area too well, probably due to the reasons you state. I do love it around Torridon, which is pretty remote and spectacular. I went up there in Feb this year whilst on R&R. The mountains were covered in snow so the crampons and ice-axe were put to good use, ideal prep for my Himalayan trip in April. I might try and get myself on a winter mountaineering AT course at Ballachulish next winter to get some time done in the Glen Coe area (not really explored). The Glen Shiel area looks spectacular as a secluded area well away from much human contact too.

Currently dipping into Stuart Maconie's compilation of walking articles (Never mind the Quantocks). There's some interesting recommendations in there for a good walk in the UK without too many people getting in the way.


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