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Anyone visited or lived in remote parts of the world?


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#41 GeordieSaint

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 01:21 PM

Currently dipping into Stuart Maconie's compilation of walking articles (Never mind the Quantocks). There's some interesting recommendations in there for a good walk in the UK without too many people getting in the way.

 

Where is recommended?


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#42 Futtocks

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 01:24 PM

Where is recommended?

Well, given that he lives in the North West, the Wainwright walks and various parts of the Lake District feature heavily, but he tends to favour the less well-known bits. I haven't got it with me right now, but it's an entertaining read.


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#43 West Country Eagle

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 01:40 PM

My brother lived in the Solomon Islands for two months for work a few years back. Said it was a fascinating but desperately poor place. He had to do some clinics on remote parts of the island chain and it took hours just to cover a few miles. The day before he left riots kicked off in the capital city, Honiara. They only just managed to get out - hours after their plane left for Brisbane flights were cancelled for days. Heavy stuff.
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#44 Wolford6

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 01:55 PM

I think Stuart Maconie lives in Birmingham.

 

I also think that he said that doesn't drive

 

Apart from the fact that he's got the most ridiculous dyed hair this side of Andy Burnham, I know next to nothing else about him.


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#45 Futtocks

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 02:05 PM

I think Stuart Maconie lives in Birmingham.

 

I also think that he said that doesn't drive

 

Apart from the fact that he's got the most ridiculous dyed hair this side of Andy Burnham, I know next to nothing else about him.

I enjoy his books, especially 'Pies and Prejudice: In search of the North', 'Adventures on the High Teas: In Search of Middle England' and 'Cider with Roadies'.


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#46 Bedford Roughyed

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 09:28 PM

Hopefully off to Nepal (Everest Base Camp) and the 21 days in the Californian wilderness (no roads, day or 2's walk to nearest town, bears...all fun!) in September.  Provided I get a bit fitter that is.


With the best, thats a good bit of PR, though I would say the Bedford team, theres, like, you know, 13 blokes who can get together at the weekend to have a game together, which doesnt point to expansion of the game. Point, yeah go on!

#47 Saint Billinge

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 06:48 AM

Two areas that are fairly wild and unvisited in the UK are Torridon in Northwest Scotland and Otterburn/Kielder in Northumberland; both beautiful and remote locations.

 

Work-wise, I have had the pleasure of Afghanistan and the hell-hole that was Sangin. If there was no people (both locals and military forces), it has the potential to be a paradise but sadly it isn't. Also been to some remote areas in Kenya, which were pretty desolate and hardly anything lives in the Darfur Mountains in Oman. However, the wildest place I have ever been in South Georgia. I managed to get out on a Naval patrol during my recent tour to the South Atlantic and it was a wild and treachrous journey on the Southern Ocean but very much worth it to visit Shackleton's grave at Gritvyken and go climbing in the surrounding mountains. The Falklands was pretty remote and spectacular too; I'd live there if it was closer to the UK.

 

During my recent post-tour leave, I went climbing in the Himalayas. I climbed Mera and Island Peak in Nepal trekking through some very remote valleys; the poverty and sense of isolation was rife. Nepalis are a very hardy bunch. Southeast Iceland is pretty remote but stunning too as is inner-Sweden; did a winter dog sledding trek around the Osterstund wilderness in 2009. Amazing!

 

My next wilderness trip is hopefully climbing a 7000m peak in the Karakoram Mountains in Pakistan (2015 hopefully). Not sure I'll get clearance with the recent killings by fundamentalists on Nanga Parbat in Jun (?) but will try to get there.

 

On visiting Kielder Forest some years ago, I was told changes were in the pipeline due to there being too many coniferous trees. I love the area around Seahouses/Alnwick, which is very peaceful. 


Edited by Saint Billinge, 09 August 2013 - 06:49 AM.

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#48 GeordieSaint

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 08:12 AM

Well, given that he lives in the North West, the Wainwright walks and various parts of the Lake District feature heavily, but he tends to favour the less well-known bits. I haven't got it with me right now, but it's an entertaining read.

 

The area to the east of Kirkstone Pass is beautiful in the Lakes and rarely visited compared to other parts. The same can be said of the mountains around Grasmoor overlooking Western Cumbria. I'll check the book out next time I am in Waterstones - thanks.

 

Hopefully off to Nepal (Everest Base Camp) and the 21 days in the Californian wilderness (no roads, day or 2's walk to nearest town, bears...all fun!) in September.  Provided I get a bit fitter that is.

 

Great news about Base Camp. Returned to Lukla via the main route to Everest from Dingboche. It's pretty amazing but tough; much steeper than you think. Hygiene is massively important so make sure you are on top it! :D Give us a PM if you need any tips etc.

 

As for the Californian wilderness, that sounds a brilliant trip. Mega jealous!

 

On visiting Kielder Forest some years ago, I was told changes were in the pipeline due to there being too many coniferous trees. I love the area around Seahouses/Alnwick, which is very peaceful. 

 

They are in the process of sustainably reducing the amount of trees according to a couple of information boards around the area. They are not massive changes but it will look different in time. As for Alnwick, I am off to a wedding there in September as some of my relatives live there. Great place!


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#49 Futtocks

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 09:00 AM

I'll check the book out next time I am in Waterstones - thanks.

It is a compilation from a column he wrote for a walking magazine, so they are all quite short sections. Good for commuting, as you read it in short bursts.


A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#50 Bedford Roughyed

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 04:25 PM

Mr Maconie walks a lot in the lakes (seems to stay there a lot), so he has a slight wainwright bias, but he does get about a bit!


With the best, thats a good bit of PR, though I would say the Bedford team, theres, like, you know, 13 blokes who can get together at the weekend to have a game together, which doesnt point to expansion of the game. Point, yeah go on!

#51 Bedford Roughyed

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 08:24 PM

Great news about Base Camp. Returned to Lukla via the main route to Everest from Dingboche. It's pretty amazing but tough; much steeper than you think. Hygiene is massively important so make sure you are on top it! :D Give us a PM if you need any tips etc.

 

 

As for the Californian wilderness, that sounds a brilliant trip. Mega jealous!

 

 

 

Might have to take you up on that!  Main concern is the fitness required.  I'm not the fittest (but lost 20kgs so far this year) but can walk 12-14 miles with a pack in lowland UK.  Lacking hills round here to walk up!


With the best, thats a good bit of PR, though I would say the Bedford team, theres, like, you know, 13 blokes who can get together at the weekend to have a game together, which doesnt point to expansion of the game. Point, yeah go on!

#52 GeordieSaint

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 07:02 PM

Might have to take you up on that!  Main concern is the fitness required.  I'm not the fittest (but lost 20kgs so far this year) but can walk 12-14 miles with a pack in lowland UK.  Lacking hills round here to walk up!

 

Don't worry too much about fitness. It is arduous of course but I saw plenty of 'old' people walking towards base camp. The real issue you'll have is adapting to the altitude. You'll go from 1500m in Kathmandu to 2800m at Lukla in about an hour. Kala Patthar is then at 5500m near base camp. There are some steep sections in places i.e. approach to Namche Bazaar and Tengboche and the key is going at your own comfortable pace without becoming breathless (or too much!). If it takes you all day to do a section, so be it. Despite that, it is definitely worth it. Everest itself is pretty spectacular, as is Ama Damblam. However, for me, Lhotse was the pick; an amazing mountain.


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#53 Bedford Roughyed

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 08:33 PM

Don't worry too much about fitness. It is arduous of course but I saw plenty of 'old' people walking towards base camp. The real issue you'll have is adapting to the altitude. You'll go from 1500m in Kathmandu to 2800m at Lukla in about an hour. Kala Patthar is then at 5500m near base camp. There are some steep sections in places i.e. approach to Namche Bazaar and Tengboche and the key is going at your own comfortable pace without becoming breathless (or too much!). If it takes you all day to do a section, so be it. Despite that, it is definitely worth it. Everest itself is pretty spectacular, as is Ama Damblam. However, for me, Lhotse was the pick; an amazing mountain.

Thanks.  I've wanted to do it for years, but it was always an 'i'll do it next year' thing.  Next is actually going to be the year!

 

I'll probably try a bit of Diamox for a helping hand!


With the best, thats a good bit of PR, though I would say the Bedford team, theres, like, you know, 13 blokes who can get together at the weekend to have a game together, which doesnt point to expansion of the game. Point, yeah go on!

#54 GeordieSaint

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 09:53 PM

I'll probably try a bit of Diamox for a helping hand!

 

Only take it if you start to get headaches. Usually takes a day or so take effect and boy do you need to use the toilet often i.e peeing all night; not an attractive proposition at 5000m! :D


Edited by GeordieSaint, 12 August 2013 - 09:54 PM.

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#55 Ex-Kirkholt

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 03:27 AM

Two areas that are fairly wild and unvisited in the UK are Torridon in Northwest Scotland and Otterburn/Kielder in Northumberland; both beautiful and remote locations.

 

In 1983 I did my undergraduate geological mapping project on Raasay in the Hebrides and spent 8 weeks there.  When you climbed to the higher points, if you looked West the view was the Cuillin on Skye, built of igneous rock that is younger than the dinosaurs (65M yrs).  When you looked East, the view was over Torridon, its red sandstone (1000M+ yrs) predates the earliest "macrofossils" such as trilobites etc. Incredible.

 

Raasay was great, most of the islanders were Scottish Gaelic speakers who would always switch to English when we were around. Most were Free Presbyterians or Free Church of Scotland - Sunday observance was very important to them. 


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#56 Bedford Roughyed

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 06:28 PM

Don't worry too much about fitness. It is arduous of course but I saw plenty of 'old' people walking towards base camp. The real issue you'll have is adapting to the altitude. You'll go from 1500m in Kathmandu to 2800m at Lukla in about an hour. Kala Patthar is then at 5500m near base camp. There are some steep sections in places i.e. approach to Namche Bazaar and Tengboche and the key is going at your own comfortable pace without becoming breathless (or too much!). If it takes you all day to do a section, so be it. Despite that, it is definitely worth it. Everest itself is pretty spectacular, as is Ama Damblam. However, for me, Lhotse was the pick; an amazing mountain.

 

Nepal is spectacular.  Had a great time, with 2 nights camping at the base camp.  Stunning views! 

 

And I climbed Kala Pattar so am virtually a mountaineer!


With the best, thats a good bit of PR, though I would say the Bedford team, theres, like, you know, 13 blokes who can get together at the weekend to have a game together, which doesnt point to expansion of the game. Point, yeah go on!

#57 henage

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 07:56 PM

I live four miles south of Mablethorpe.....remote in time and space.

been sand racing a few times at Mapplethorpe , in winter , good beach .

also use to go bait digging(spurn) , walk out from Crown and Anchor onto the worm beds dig for a few hours then get back before tide rushed in .


Edited by henage, 12 May 2014 - 08:06 PM.


#58 Saintslass

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 08:41 PM

In Aussie terms it's probably not isolated, but I recently drove from Berri to Adelaide in the middle of the night on my own.  After an hour or so I pulled over at a rest stop to take a break and got out of the car.     Dead quiet, no other traffic on the road, millions of stars in the sky.  Just beautiful.  It was a pity to get back underway.

I spent three months visiting friends in Western Australia.  Lots of remoteness there!  I'd include standing on the beach at the bottom of the state, looking out on to the Southern Ocean knowing that the next landmass is Antarctica. 

 

But I also thought Glen Coe in Scotland pretty remote too, especially when the weather was bad and I was low on petrol wondering whether I would make it through to civilisation before the car stalled!



#59 GeordieSaint

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 10:05 PM

Nepal is spectacular.  Had a great time, with 2 nights camping at the base camp.  Stunning views! 

 

And I climbed Kala Pattar so am virtually a mountaineer!

 

:D

 

Well done; glad you enjoyed it! Doing anything is hard work above 5000m so that's a great effort! How was the flight into Lukla?

 

So what's your next challenge? Mt Blanc next Sep? ;)


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#60 Tiny Tim

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 10:11 PM

Don't suppose anyone on here's been to the Isle of Coll up in the Hebrides? It appears my little brother who went AWOL some years back is living up there and is engaged to a Scottish girly.


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