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The price of a cyclist's life: 240 hours unpaid work


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#1 JohnM

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 03:27 PM

The price of a cyclist's life?   240 days unpaid work, 2 year driving ban, a £60 surcharge and £85 court costs

 

 

see story

 

Having missed a stop sign westbound on the A692, Conlan drove his Saab 93 straight out into the road, sending Mr McGregor, cycling north on the A68, hurtling across the road onto a footpath.

The 55-year-old cyclist, of Pelton, near Chester-le-Street, died in hospital five days later.

 

 

 


Edited by JohnM, 28 August 2013 - 05:13 PM.


#2 ckn

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 03:31 PM

240 HOURS, not days.


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#3 JohnM

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 05:12 PM

yes, well, the red mist had descended!!!



#4 gingerjon

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 05:39 PM

Sentences are getting tougher.
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#5 Phil

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 05:41 PM

Who's going to be the first to blame the cyclist?


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#6 Bostik Bailey

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 07:48 AM

There you go everyone, if you want to bump someone off, just run them down when there are riding a bike.

In fact rather than go through the costly process of divorce just buy the misses a bike.

Even though I'm a cyclist, I tend to try to see both sides of the point. In that some incidents could be avoided by the cyclists, through choice of route, defensive riding etc, but seeing the junction I just can't see any way how the cyclist could have avoided this. Apparently the stop signs where not clear etc, but what is clear is the the driver was approaching building/ houses, and automatically should have slowed down.

Why is impatience and ignorance a defence/mitigation for manslaughter.

#7 Griff9of13

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 09:27 AM

It's not just cyclists: Three peoples live only worth a total of £4,300 and no additional penalties.  


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#8 Johnoco

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 09:56 AM

There you go everyone, if you want to bump someone off, just run them down when there are riding a bike.

In fact rather than go through the costly process of divorce just buy the misses a bike.

Even though I'm a cyclist, I tend to try to see both sides of the point. In that some incidents could be avoided by the cyclists, through choice of route, defensive riding etc, but seeing the junction I just can't see any way how the cyclist could have avoided this. Apparently the stop signs where not clear etc, but what is clear is the the driver was approaching building/ houses, and automatically should have slowed down.

Why is impatience and ignorance a defence/mitigation for manslaughter.

Good shout. Whilst it seems like the guy is riddled with guilt over this, that's not sufficient punishment. If you can't slow down in a built up area then you are a menace. It was a cyclist he killed but could easily have been a child or OAP stepping in the road (or you and me)

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#9 MattSantos

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 11:29 AM

So what would be an appropriate punishment here?



#10 Bostik Bailey

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 11:51 AM

So what would be an appropriate punishment here?


That is a very good question. Whilst we all want revenge that's not what the system is primarily for.

Having said that there needs to be a deterrent. For this I think back to the bad old days of drink driving, when it was the norm to go out drink 4-5pints and drive the short way home, if you got caught you were a bit unlucky. But drunk drivers were causing accidents, of course the perception was that it wasn't your social drinker that caused this.

However with more and more draconian penalties for drink driving people stopped talking the chance.

Therefore we need a deterrent sentence for killing someone whilst in control of a car. At the moment people drive inappropriately because they know the penalties will not be too severe.

If it was the standard that if you killed someone whilst driving you were deprived of your freedom then slowly (just like drink and driving) normal people would modify their driving. Unless this happens and the driver is just thought to be unlucky for causing the crash then things will not change.

#11 gingerjon

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 11:53 AM

So what would be an appropriate punishment here?

 

Something from here perhaps.


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#12 MattSantos

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 11:57 AM

 So, how do we objectively prove dangerous driving?



#13 gingerjon

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 12:06 PM

 So, how do we objectively prove dangerous driving?

 

I think the part where one admits to not concentrating and knocking over and killing someone.


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#14 Bostik Bailey

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 12:06 PM

Something from here perhaps.


Oh thank for ginge,

So level 2 should have been used 'Gross avoidable distractions such as reading or composing text messages'

4-7 years in custody


Hmmmm it looks like we have the legislation but still have the perception the motorist are just unlucky to be involved in an accident.

Ok in this case the guy was a family man and any custody sentence would affect his family etc, but we need to stop this, a punitive sentence would be in the public interest because it would set a precedent and begin the way towards a deterrent.

#15 gingerjon

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 12:11 PM

Oh thank for ginge,

So level 2 should have been used 'Gross avoidable distractions such as reading or composing text messages'

4-7 years in custody


Hmmmm it looks like we have the legislation but still have the perception the motorist are just unlucky to be involved in an accident.

Ok in this case the guy was a family man and any custody sentence would affect his family etc, but we need to stop this, a punitive sentence would be in the public interest because it would set a precedent and begin the way towards a deterrent.

 

Incidentally, yesterday a motorist was sentenced for causing the death by dangerous driving of two people in a car on a motorway.  He was distracted by texting.

 

He got five years.


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#16 gingerjon

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 12:13 PM

Oh thank for ginge,

So level 2 should have been used 'Gross avoidable distractions such as reading or composing text messages'

4-7 years in custody


Hmmmm it looks like we have the legislation but still have the perception the motorist are just unlucky to be involved in an accident.

Ok in this case the guy was a family man and any custody sentence would affect his family etc, but we need to stop this, a punitive sentence would be in the public interest because it would set a precedent and begin the way towards a deterrent.

I'm not after vengeance but something in line with manslaughter at least should be the starting point.  I am ###### angry seeing sentence after sentence where some ######wit in a car gets away with killing or seriously injuring someone because of crocodile tears of remorse.


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#17 hindle xiii

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 12:20 PM

Incidentally, yesterday a motorist was sentenced for causing the death by dangerous driving of two people in a car on a motorway.  He was distracted by texting.

 

He got five years.

HGV driver no less.

 

It happened probably 10 minutes before Dad and I got on the M62 to work.


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#18 Griff

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 12:28 PM

Whilst not relevant to the OP, cyclists are not always innocent parties.  A few months ago, in a queue of traffic, a cyclist overtook me on the right then cut sharply in front of me to pass a right-turning lorry on the left. I did stop next to him a little further up the road to recommend that he purchased and read a copy of the Highway Code.  Cyclists riding through red lights and up one-way streets the wrong way is common-place. A little acceptance of their own vulnerability would be sensible.


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#19 gingerjon

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 12:33 PM

Whilst not relevant to the OP

 

Let me just stop you there.


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#20 Severus

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 12:38 PM

Whilst not relevant to the OP, cyclists are not always innocent parties.  A few months ago, in a queue of traffic, a cyclist overtook me on the right then cut sharply in front of me to pass a right-turning lorry on the left. I did stop next to him a little further up the road to recommend that he purchased and read a copy of the Highway Code.  Cyclists riding through red lights and up one-way streets the wrong way is common-place. A little acceptance of their own vulnerability would be sensible.

 

As a driver and a cyclist I can assure you that drivers are far worst than cyclists for not following the rules of the road.


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