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1937

Lions v Liverpool Stanley

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#1 Bleep1673

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 10:19 PM


Swinton RLFC est 1866 - Supplying England with players when most of your clubs were in nappies

#2 RIGGY

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 04:26 PM

I thought I saw Spelly standing next to Mad Eric just near the tunnel  :tongue:



#3 Blue Monkey

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 06:35 PM

I thought I saw Spelly standing next to Mad Eric just near the tunnel  :tongue:No

 

No, that must have been Spelly's granddad and Eric when he were a lad.



#4 class of 63

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 11:23 PM

I definitely could not have been there in the 30s - the 40s probably- anyone on the forum who could have been there in 1937 ?



#5 mark richardson

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 09:08 AM

I definitely could not have been there in the 30s - the 40s probably- anyone on the forum who could have been there in 1937 ?

My dad possibly ....aged 2 with my grandad!

#6 class of 63

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 08:04 PM

My dad possibly ....aged 2 with my grandad!

That's great Mark -  your Dad has obviously seem so many changes in the fortunes of our club, but like me he was privileged to have experienced the halcyon years of the 60s 



#7 mark richardson

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 06:22 AM

Swinton is in our family's DNA. I've mentioned previously that my dads family moved to Swinton around 1900 from the edges of Cumbria to work at Agecroft. My great grandad was the horse master for the pit horses . The family soon began to follow the Lions
My grandad was a fan from childhood until he died in 1982 . We would all attend the match together and as he got older we migrated into the stand sitting near another occasional contributor on here (iomlion) who I later worked proudly with. He was there similarly with three or four generations of his family.
My grandad would tell me about Butters and my dad about Buckley and we all enjoyed the skills of Wilson and Bate and we always looked out for Hodgson walking up Station Rd.
Sadly I think this was my dads last season. Hes too immobile now to get to a game.
I will keep the flag flying but I can't pass it on to my children as I have none! My godson is my only hope but hes going to be a doctor so he'll be busy for a bit.....maybe in a few years he can come to Hunslet with me!
So I would guess that over this 110 year history they have seen some changes
I don't doubt that they have disliked many. I don't doubt that team selection. ..the running of the club. ....the lack of information. ...etc etc has tested their loyalty. Yet theynever ever lost the faith.
I never will either. Despite the best efforts of some people my spirit will not be dampened.
The lions are with me for life. Blind loyalty.

Edited by mark richardson, 30 September 2013 - 06:23 AM.


#8 Paul Davidson

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 11:34 PM

Superb posting Mark. That's what true support is about. Let's make sure the name of Swinton Lions continues for another few hundred years!

#9 class of 63

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 11:18 AM

Swinton is in our family's DNA. I've mentioned previously that my dads family moved to Swinton around 1900 from the edges of Cumbria to work at Agecroft. My great grandad was the horse master for the pit horses . The family soon began to follow the Lions
My grandad was a fan from childhood until he died in 1982 . We would all attend the match together and as he got older we migrated into the stand sitting near another occasional contributor on here (iomlion) who I later worked proudly with. He was there similarly with three or four generations of his family.
My grandad would tell me about Butters and my dad about Buckley and we all enjoyed the skills of Wilson and Bate and we always looked out for Hodgson walking up Station Rd.
Sadly I think this was my dads last season. Hes too immobile now to get to a game.
I will keep the flag flying but I can't pass it on to my children as I have none! My godson is my only hope but hes going to be a doctor so he'll be busy for a bit.....maybe in a few years he can come to Hunslet with me!
So I would guess that over this 110 year history they have seen some changes
I don't doubt that they have disliked many. I don't doubt that team selection. ..the running of the club. ....the lack of information. ...etc etc has tested their loyalty. Yet theynever ever lost the faith.
I never will either. Despite the best efforts of some people my spirit will not be dampened.
The lions are with me for life. Blind loyalty.

Brilliant Mark - I can relate to those memories, although I am from a different era than you the one thing we have in common is passion for our club - blind loyalty indeed



#10 Blue Monkey

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 09:47 PM

...and we always looked out for Hodgson walking up Station Road.
 

 

I never looked out for Hodgson walking up Station Road - as we walked down from the Windmill on the top road after crossing near where Queensway now runs. The 1930s Clively estate just off Rake Lane where I grew up (my dad worked at the Chloride) was a bit isolated when I was a lad with only two “corner shops” (Lunn's on Rake Lane and Fred Broadhurst's on Clively Avenue plus a tiny now-long-gone shop, Cooper's, at the bottom of City Walk on the corner of Martha Street overlooking Slack Brook) serving our estate and the burgeoning new post-war council estates on the other side of the Rake (The ‘birds’ roads - Falcon Crescent etc plus the 'castles' roads – Castleway etc which soon followed). The last swathe of council housing arrived with the Denbigh Road estate tagged onto the bright new modern shops of the Green which brought just a touch of civilisation to us out on the edge of frontier land overlooking the Irwell Valley. With just the Whitegate stores further up near the Beehive, that was your lot, so to speak, until you accessed the 'top road' with Pendlebury Market and a whole string of handy ‘beer houses’, some of which have since been consigned to history, in one form or another. I'm not 100% certain but I'm sure we used to pass 1920s era hooker Henry Blewer sat outside the Beehive from time to time. He had, as I recall, a very ruddy boozer's complexion.

And, almost unbelievably, there were two farms along Rake Lane. One just off where Martin Road now runs and the other behind the Beehive. Walking from near the Beehive in the pre-Queensway era was along a footpath between two fields and then one path right through the middle of another field with a stile at each end - and no street lighting - just the odd friendly cow to avoid all the way to the bright lights of Engine Brow near the Palace picture house, aka “the Bug”, opposite the Windmill. But of course, all this dicing with farming livestock could be avoided by taking the LUT No 11 bus (or one of the works buses - Pilks, Chloride or MEL) which ran from the end of Whitehead Road up Rake Lane and Billy Lane (past Newtown pit), down Station Road and all the way to Eccles via Folly Lane. I think it was 2d from opposite the Britannia, 1d for kids to Whitehead Road with the old St Thomas’s ‘Tin Mission’ across the road.

My family has a bit of Swinton F.C. DNA too, at least on my mother's side. Harold "Harry" Unsworth, b. 1896, (early 1920s team) was my great uncle/my granddad’s brother – one of five - and 1950s winger Gordon Hardman was my mother's cousin/my grandmother's (nee Hardman) nephew.

 

:yahoo:






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