Jump to content


Rugby League World - Grand Finals Issue

RUGBY LEAGUE WORLD - THE GRAND FINALS ISSUE - OUT 17 OCT OR DOWNLOAD IT NOW!
Try our Fantastic 4-Issue Bundle Offer:
For just £14, a saving of 10% on the regular cover price, you’ll get:

The Grand Finals Issue (out 17 Oct) – Grand Final drama from both hemispheres plus Four Nations preview
The Four Nations Issue (out 21 Nov) – Fantastic coverage of the Four Nations tournament down under
The Golden Boot Issue (out 19 Dec) – A look back at the 2014 season plus the big reveal of the winner of the Golden Boot
The 2015 Season Preview Issue (out 23 Jan) – How will your team perform in 2015? We preview every club.


League Express

Podcast

Photo
- - - - -

Scotland and Ireland need professional RL teams


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 sigesige00

sigesige00
  • Coach
  • 233 posts

Posted 04 October 2013 - 07:38 AM

Scotland and Ireland need professional RL teams.  As for Scotland, I think that the region of former The Borders is appropriate, because there is no professional RU team.  I am not sure about Ireland.  Do you think that it is possible?



#2 willy

willy
  • Coach
  • 228 posts

Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:06 AM

The borders area is where most of the scots in the past have come from in the GB teams. Huddersfield had a few from that region in the 20th century.

 

It all comes down to money, outside of Edinburgh and Glasgow there isn't much for sport that's not already tied up, and an attempt to get a team up and running in say Aberdeen to play full time or semi pro at championship level would need a spend just to get them to matches.



#3 Futtocks

Futtocks
  • Coach
  • 20,764 posts

Posted 04 October 2013 - 09:29 AM

Scotland and Ireland need professional RL teams.  As for Scotland, I think that the region of former The Borders is appropriate, because there is no professional RU team.  I am not sure about Ireland.  Do you think that it is possible?

Scotland can barely support professional RU. The borders are sparsely populated in terms of players and potential spectators, and if the long-established RU sides there are semi-pro at best, the remaining pickings would be very thin.

 

If it were to happen anywhere, I would suggest the larger towns and cities would be a better starting point, but it would be a very long-term project (not always RL's strong point).


A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#4 EdinburghExile

EdinburghExile
  • Coach
  • 586 posts

Posted 04 October 2013 - 12:18 PM

Would have to be a team in Edinburgh and/or Glasgow financed by someone with six-figure cash to burn every year. Starting on a small scale in Championship 1 is doable as the new teams have proved this year, but the back-up of say a university, or strong and persistent development work are a must.



#5 Henson Park Old Firm

Henson Park Old Firm
  • Coach
  • 307 posts

Posted 04 October 2013 - 09:40 PM

I agree, Scotland/Ireland needs at least one  club each in the Championship 1



#6 Phil

Phil
  • Coach
  • 1,943 posts

Posted 05 October 2013 - 12:46 PM

There's been some great development work done in Scotland but I'm not sure if there's the potential uptake for the pro game yet.

 

Ideally a team in Edinburgh and a team in Glasgow could play on the rivalry between the cities, but not yet I fear.


"Freedom without socialism is privilege and injustice, socialism without freedom is slavery and brutality" - Mikhail Bakunin

#7 donald

donald
  • Coach
  • 573 posts

Posted 06 October 2013 - 10:48 AM

Dumfries is the only large town in the borders think theres about 40,000 live there not big enough to get support for SL although their football ground would be good enough for SL if they wanted to give it a go



#8 nec

nec
  • Coach
  • 2,353 posts

Posted 06 October 2013 - 12:04 PM

Dumfries is the only large town in the borders think theres about 40,000 live there not big enough to get support for SL although their football ground would be good enough for SL if they wanted to give it a go

Dumfries is a football town, not rugby. Go for Galashiels, Selkirk or Hawick. All on A7 so accessible from M6 N of Carlisle and despite low individual populations may rally around a combined RL side. Certainly worth taking a pre-season game there to test the water.


Rugby League is a sport that desperately needs to expand its geographical supporter base and its player base. This imperative means that all other requirements are secondary until this is done.

All power in the game should be with governing bodies, especially international governing bodies.

Without these actions we will remain a minor sport internationally and nationally.

#9 walter sobchak

walter sobchak
  • Coach
  • 1,875 posts

Posted 06 October 2013 - 12:30 PM

Dumfries is a football town, not rugby. Go for Galashiels, Selkirk or Hawick. All on A7 so accessible from M6 N of Carlisle and despite low individual populations may rally around a combined RL side. Certainly worth taking a pre-season game there to test the water.


Would union folk follow a league team? I'm not so sure. Glasgow is of course football mad while Edinburgh not so much, although there is hibs and hearts. I think the populations of both Glasgow and Edinburgh are large enough for rugby league to carve a niche in and gain a following but a lot of groundwork would have to be done.

#10 nec

nec
  • Coach
  • 2,353 posts

Posted 06 October 2013 - 01:31 PM

Would union folk follow a league team? I'm not so sure. Glasgow is of course football mad while Edinburgh not so much, although there is hibs and hearts. I think the populations of both Glasgow and Edinburgh are large enough for rugby league to carve a niche in and gain a following but a lot of groundwork would have to be done.

Don't necessarily disagree, more countering the idea of Dumfries. I think we can learn from the successes we have had in Hemel & Wrexham as well, smallish towns that can get behind a local side can be more successful than sides in a conurbation such as London, Manchester, Edinburgh or Glasgow.


Rugby League is a sport that desperately needs to expand its geographical supporter base and its player base. This imperative means that all other requirements are secondary until this is done.

All power in the game should be with governing bodies, especially international governing bodies.

Without these actions we will remain a minor sport internationally and nationally.

#11 irishfan

irishfan
  • Players
  • 36 posts

Posted 07 October 2013 - 11:53 AM

I would say Ireland is a long way off a professional team at the moment.

 

Need to get stable amateur leagues going for many years first.

 

I would love to play for a team but the closest one (according to IrelandRL's website) is over an hour away.

 

But I would be hopeful. The fast paced and physical nature of league will be attractive for both viewers and potential players.



#12 EdinburghExile

EdinburghExile
  • Coach
  • 586 posts

Posted 07 October 2013 - 12:08 PM

Would union folk follow a league team? I'm not so sure. Glasgow is of course football mad while Edinburgh not so much, although there is hibs and hearts. I think the populations of both Glasgow and Edinburgh are large enough for rugby league to carve a niche in and gain a following but a lot of groundwork would have to be done.

Most union fans up here that I speak to seem to be perfectly happy to watch both, and really enjoy league. There are some who are indifferent too, and some outright disparaging, but not on the scale of down south.

 

With ongoing investment, a team is perfectly viable. It would probably take a long time to become independently viable of course, but that's why long-term investment is what's needed for any new venture.



#13 Aberdeen Angus

Aberdeen Angus
  • Players
  • 23 posts

Posted 12 October 2013 - 02:55 PM

Doesn't help when the top team in Scotland is denied a place in the Harry Jepson trophy. Also doesn't help when at youth level the top team in Scotland is told that clubs from Central Belt will not travel to provide competition. None of these things are conducive to developing players, attracting interest, securing sponsors - all of which is required to get to the point of having a sustainable professional team. The North of Scotland develops the game as a result of the hard work of a few unpaid volunteers who also run and develop their own clubs - no Development Officer. For all that the North still manages to have this year's champions and 2 out of 3 Saltire Cup trophies. So if anywhere looks like coming close to getting a pro club then look to Aberdeen. If local sponsor(s) could be found to support a 5-10 year development plan then Aberdeen could be the home of Scotland's first pro club.



#14 EdinburghExile

EdinburghExile
  • Coach
  • 586 posts

Posted 14 October 2013 - 12:27 PM

Would be great! Maybe they could move into Pittodrie when AFC move into their new ground :)



#15 Northern Sol

Northern Sol
  • Moderator
  • 17,271 posts

Posted 14 October 2013 - 05:30 PM

Dumfries is a football town, not rugby. Go for Galashiels, Selkirk or Hawick. All on A7 so accessible from M6 N of Carlisle and despite low individual populations may rally around a combined RL side. Certainly worth taking a pre-season game there to test the water.


The Borders region failed to turn out in sufficient numbers to support a pro rugby union side, why would league be different?

#16 nec

nec
  • Coach
  • 2,353 posts

Posted 17 October 2013 - 08:03 AM

The Borders region failed to turn out in sufficient numbers to support a pro rugby union side, why would league be different?

Not saying it definitely would however at champ 1 level crowds between 500-1000 would be a success, costs need to be low which may mitigate against Central Belt cities due to rent and Aberdeen due to travel costs
Rugby League is a sport that desperately needs to expand its geographical supporter base and its player base. This imperative means that all other requirements are secondary until this is done.

All power in the game should be with governing bodies, especially international governing bodies.

Without these actions we will remain a minor sport internationally and nationally.