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#1 Leeds Wire

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 06:41 PM

Hi folks

 

Got a question for you about my wifi signal at home.

 

We've bought the fastest BT business wireless malarkey known to humanity, yet as soon as you take a device downstairs the wifi dies on its backside, as though I've left the country but am still trying to connect to my home wifi. The wifi is lightning fast on the desktop that sits next to the router.

 

However, the laptop (macbook) tells me I have a full signal, yet it takes about 2-3 minutes to load a simple web page.  The diagnostic tool tells me its all fine...

 

So I downloaded an app called wifi signal, which tells me my signal is poor (50%, whatever that means) and that my noise level is about 20% (ditto). It also says that there are no stronger available wifi channels.

 

What's the problem, anyone, please? BT have tested the line five times and claim its working at full capacity. I'm currently sat within 10 metres of the router upstairs but there's only one wall and one ceiling separating me from the router.

 

Thanks in advance of your help!

 

Mark



#2 Larry the Leit

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 06:47 PM

Buy an apple airport (£70), plug it in to he router and use that instead, turn if the wifi on the router. Sorted.

Other solutions are available but this is a doddle.
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#3 Old Frightful

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 07:25 PM

Buy an apple airport (£70), plug it in to he router and use that instead, turn if the wifi on the router. Sorted.

Other solutions are available but this is a doddle.

If this works in Wakefield, using it should get you sorted anywhere in the universe.


          NO BUTS IT'S GOT TO BE BUTTER......                                 Z1N2MybzplQR6XBrwB9egniMH8xqYQ5s.jpg                                                                                                                     


#4 Leeds Wire

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 07:35 PM

Buy an apple airport (£70), plug it in to he router and use that instead, turn if the wifi on the router. Sorted.

Other solutions are available but this is a doddle.

ta for the tip, but I don't quite get it - we've got the top of the range wifi and router so what sort of plug-in adaptor thing would somehow provide a miracle cure? Genuine question btw...



#5 Larry the Leit

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 08:15 PM

ta for the tip, but I don't quite get it - we've got the top of the range wifi and router so what sort of plug-in adaptor thing would somehow provide a miracle cure? Genuine question btw...

My instinct is that your wireless element of the router is bobbins from a range perspective.  I use an Apple Airport whilst on tour with my band, as hotel wifi is variable, whilst the wired access is generally good.  I have awful wifi coverage in any room other than where the router is at home, unless I shove the airport in and then it's fine (old building, three stories, lots of thick walls and wood).

 

An aquantence suggested the following as a solution some months ago..... but I went for the airport as it was useful  whilst travelling.

 

 

The powerline adaptors that I use are made by a company called Devolo,
 
 
I purchased 2 of the items below, I currently only have one set up in the lounge.  A network cable goes from my ISP router (I have disabled the wireless from this device) to the bottom of the item.  This is the most cost effective unit and if you don't need to connect a device via a hard wired network cable then this would be the best option.  You can then simply buy another one of these units and plug it into a power outlet anywhere in the house and it extends the wireless network.
 
 
I use this one up in my study, it has a built in Wireless N router and enables connection of 3 wired / RJ45 network connectors.  The device also has a plug socket so you don't end up loosing one.  I don't tend to use this device to its full potential, it would prove useful if I had a device that required a network cable connection i.e. didn't have wireless.
 

Edited by Larry the Leit, 18 October 2013 - 08:39 PM.

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#6 Leeds Wire

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 10:05 PM

That makes sense now, thanks pal, much appreciated :yes:

 

I still don't see why we have to pay for a top notch business broadband but have to buy a signal booster - but if it works then fine. We live in a 1930s house with big thick stone walls, so maybe that's the cause.



#7 Larry the Leit

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 06:04 AM

That makes sense now, thanks pal, much appreciated :yes:

I still don't see why we have to pay for a top notch business broadband but have to buy a signal booster - but if it works then fine. We live in a 1930s house with big thick stone walls, so maybe that's the cause.


Again I don't know, but I'd guess it looks nice but is probably pap.
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#8 ckn

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:10 AM

Essentially the faster the wifi, the shorter the effective range.  Often I'd blame the receiving computer rather than the wifi but Macbooks of all varieties have very good wifi kit built in.

 

Can I assume you live in an area with lots of other houses?  There are only so many wifi channels available as it wasn't designed for use in areas where more than 10 wifi networks might be competing for the same aerial bandwidth.  Also, wifi is quite intolerant to old-fashioned heavy brick and stonework houses, if you're using the latest wifi technology then it's even worse.  We live in an area with very few competing wifi sources and our house isn't that big but I still have two wifi routers working at once.  I deliberately have them working as two discreet networks, one connects the wifi infrastructure of the house, e.g. server to AppleTV, radio, etc., the other is my normal usage one for our laptops, iPad and phones, that way I can stream big files on one while still getting full speed on the other.

 

I used to use the powerline stuff here at home when wifi didn't go above 54mbps, quite good but effectively you halve the rated speed for every segment of your home electrics you're using.  For example, if your internet router is on the ground floor ring and your computer is on the first floor ring then you should really expect no better than 1/4 the rated speed.  This is entirely dependent on the quality of your home electrics, if you're using chunky premium home power cabling then you'll go higher, if you're using bargain basement cable using a few strands of copper then it'll be abysmal.  Also, this is very disruption prone and also disruptive, put your microwave or hairdryer on and you can say goodbye to any reasonable data, some people I know even lose data speeds when their boiler kicks in.  On the disruptive side, if you have a neighbour that uses CB radio then they'll not appreciate you at all as you'll be seriously interfering with their signal.  That all said, it's a very good way to connect isolated bits of kit that have no wifi, e.g. SkyHD boxes, and can be a neat solution to fixing data connection problems in old houses.  p.s. you can usually ignore the stuff about not plugging powerline kit into extension cables, that's not very accurate, it should be a warning that if you have high power drain kit on the same extension cable then you run the risk of data degradation but general usage equipment is usually fine.

 

When we were getting fibre installed I realised that the powerline stuff just couldn't handle it effectively and ran a single CAT6 cable from my front hall internet router to my office upstairs.  Took a bit of careful planning to make sure it was neat and hidden but it was definitely the best decision as it's full speed and essentially interference free.


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#9 Northern Sol

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 05:22 PM

That makes sense now, thanks pal, much appreciated :yes:
 
I still don't see why we have to pay for a top notch business broadband but have to buy a signal booster - but if it works then fine. We live in a 1930s house with big thick stone walls, so maybe that's the cause.


It probably is. The stone floor will "absorb" a lot of the signal.

#10 Futtocks

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 09:13 AM

Yes, wi-fi is a delicate thing, and walls/floors will knacker it even over a short distance. Both my Dad and my sister have installed wi-fi extenders so they can get a useable signal in all necessary areas of their houses (again, thick stone walls in both cases).


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