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The Good Tory writes ...


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#1 gingerjon

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 07:19 AM

http://www.theguardi...mobility-speech


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#2 JohnM

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 08:00 AM

quite right. Guardian misses the point as usual. Its not Cameron in particular but Labour; civil service, BBC , NHS too..and The Guardian itself...

#3 Trojan

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 08:15 AM

quite right. Guardian misses the point as usual. Its not Cameron in particular but Labour; civil service, BBC , NHS too..and The Guardian itself...

In other words everyone's out of step except our Dave!

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#4 Methven Hornet

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 08:46 AM

Good Tories can't write! ;)
"There are now more pandas in Scotland than Tory MPs."

#5 Bearman

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:25 AM

Good Tory? Another oxymoron?
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#6 JohnM

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:31 AM

What a silly billy you are!

 

Good Tories can't write! ;)

 

 

How would you know?



#7 Wolford6

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:32 AM

 

How would you know?

 

He has to try and decipher their handwriting on enelope-addresses.


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#8 Wolford6

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:35 AM

John Major:

"In every single sphere of British influence, the upper echelons of power in 2013 are held overwhelmingly by the privately educated or the affluent middle class," he is reported to have said. "To me, from my background, I find that truly shocking."

 

Tell me, in what way does the majority of Labour's shadow cabinet differ?


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#9 gingerjon

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:41 AM

John Major:

"In every single sphere of British influence, the upper echelons of power in 2013 are held overwhelmingly by the privately educated or the affluent middle class," he is reported to have said. "To me, from my background, I find that truly shocking."

 

Tell me, in what way does the majority of Labour's shadow cabinet differ?

 

That would rather prove his point further.

 

But given that he is a member of the Tory party, a former Tory PM and speaking at a Tory party event it's not surprising what his main focus was.


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#10 gingerjon

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:44 AM

quite right. Guardian misses the point as usual. Its not Cameron in particular but Labour; civil service, BBC , NHS too..and The Guardian itself...

 

The NHS would be hard to change because, by and large, it will recruit from people who have just completed medical degrees.  Medical degrees do not come cheap.  The issue is therefore more to do with whether and how people from poorer backgrounds are supported there.

 

The BBC used to - I don't know if they still do - have specific recruitment campaigns targeted at people from ethnic backgrounds, disability, under-represented regions etc.  They got soundly thrashed for it in the media.  As it's quite an expensive way of recruiting I doubt they still do it quite so much.

 

87% of people in the print media went to public school.  The Guardian is as bad as the rest in this regard.  But, like every other aspect of the print media, they never seem to notice.

 

I haven't a clue about the civil service.


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#11 Johnoco

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:44 AM

He's right.The middle classes have already ruined football and popular music, they won;t be happy until they have ruined everything!



#12 WearyRhino

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:51 AM


The BBC used to - I don't know if they still do - have specific recruitment campaigns targeted at people from ethnic backgrounds, disability, under-represented regions etc. They got soundly thrashed for it in the media. As it's quite an expensive way of recruiting I doubt they still do it quite so much


Sadly, they ended up with a despicable, social climbing, unprincipled crook heading up their HR department!

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#13 archibald

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 10:01 AM

So, the privately educated and affluent middle class (who may or not have been privately educated, but lets gloss over that as it ruins the headline) run most of the stuff? Who'd have thought it.

I'm sure this article was also written in the 1700's, 1800's, 1900's as well.

 

One day, the people will rise up and take control, then they too will become the affluent middle classes and may spend some of this affluence on, oh, i don't know, privately educating their offspring.



#14 gingerjon

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 10:15 AM

He's right.The middle classes have already ruined football and popular music, they won;t be happy until they have ruined everything!

 

To be (slightly) fair, it is thanks to the codifying gentry that the Football Association was formed in the first place.


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#15 Johnoco

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 10:43 AM

To be (slightly) fair, it is thanks to the codifying gentry that the Football Association was formed in the first place.

Yes but they then abandoned it for a long time leaving it for the great unwashed.

 

Mind, I better be careful with you. You're pretty posh these days ;)



#16 JohnM

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 10:47 AM

yais. He lives in the 'fonts! They are so posh they get out of the bath to use the  toilet!



#17 ckn

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 10:48 AM

The problem with that piece is the inclusion of "middle class".  Surely if you use the classic interpretations of class then you expect your senior civil servants and politicians to be middle class, don't you?  They're certainly not working class except in their delusions, even the most fervent lefty socialist MP is still middle class whether they like it or not.

 

If he'd simply left it as "affluent" or "rich" and privately educated then it would have had a far bigger and undiluted impact.  There are far too many people who are from seriously wealthy families whose connections and money have helped ensure that they get where they are.

 

It's nowhere near as bad as the USA though, to become a candidate for President, you either have to be outstandingly wealthy or have outstandingly wealthy backers.  There was over $2bn spent on the 2012 US Presidential election alone and a further $5bn on the 2012 elections to Senate and Congress.  And that's not counting the money spent by 3rd party backers as "friends of" through media influencing, advertising, etc.  All of those providing external funding wants their money back from those in power though, be it through tax systems or outright favouritism in political decisions.  The US government is thoroughly bought and paid-for by third parties.

 

In the UK, I like the seriously small election pot of £49m in 2010.  It stops the rampant buying of MP seats and any increase beyond inflationary increases should be sternly opposed.  It's not going to be a surprise to many that the Tories are full of wealthy people at the top, that nice picture of the Bullingdon Club with Dave, Osborne and Boris says it all really.  The problem is that the counterbalance of a Labour party being driven from the other end, union shop stewards and working class people with a healthy smattering of left-leaning others, is long a part of history now.  To get a preferential run at a Labour seat you either have to be a celebrity or come through the PPE route, you can still get on through other means but it's far rarer these days than in the past.


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#18 Wolford6

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:15 PM

 

 

To get a preferential run at a Labour seat you either have to be a celebrity or come through the PPE route, you can still get on through other means but it's far rarer these days than in the past.

 

What's happened to Steve May, anyway?

;)


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#19 archibald

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:31 PM

It's nowhere near as bad as the USA though, to become a candidate for President, you either have to be outstandingly wealthy or have outstandingly wealthy backers.  There was over $2bn spent on the 2012 US Presidential election alone and a further $5bn on the 2012 elections to Senate and Congress.  And that's not counting the money spent by 3rd party backers as "friends of" through media influencing, advertising, etc.  All of those providing external funding wants their money back from those in power though, be it through tax systems or outright favouritism in political decisions.  The US government is thoroughly bought and paid-for by third parties.

Yes, but not all start off like that. The current incumbent had some serious obstacles to overcome, yet there he sits, in the Oval office.

The difference in the States is there's this dream that anyone can become president, it's complete ######, but they still harbour this belief. Whereas over here it's treated with disdain, people would rather sit in their 6-2/2-10 existence and ##### and whine about the unfairness of it all, while doing precisely the square root of sod all about it. Americans may not like Obama/Bush/Carter/Reagan/Clinton or agree with their policies but they  sure as hell don't have this inverse snobbery that permeates our daily lives.

 

What's that expression the left wing nut jobs use about the Tories? "They think they're born to rule". And they use it as an insult like it's somehow noble to be born to be a subservient oaf.



#20 Methven Hornet

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 06:49 PM

He has to try and decipher their handwriting on enelope-addresses.


It was a touch more sinister than that! :devil:


"There are now more pandas in Scotland than Tory MPs."




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