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Jack Whitelaw


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#41 808tone

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 11:13 PM

I would have avoided her but I make frequent train journeys and Miranda is one of the few programmes on the mini tellies that I haven't seen yet. I'm actually converted. It's not particularly sophisticated and won't win many awards but it is very funny.

It's not funny but BBC cosy like My Family....which I loved.



#42 808tone

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 11:16 PM

comedy is a dead format almost, jack whatever is name is is a prime example, people used to get along in comedy by being genuinely funny, now it seems going to drama school and having the right connections gives you the right to make people laugh, sorry but none of these rambling smarmy clever trousers types raises me a smile,

 

FUNNY                                                                  NOT FUNNY

father ted                                                                miranda

emo philps                                                              noel fielding

the league of gentlemen                                         john bishop

vic and bob                                                             regular smarmy scripted panel show guests

Steptoe and son                                                     my family

early doors                                                             eddie izzard

the office                                                                ricky gervais  after the office

George and mildred                                               russel brand

psychoville                                                             Michael mc intyre

90s harry enfield stuff                                            friends

harry hill tv series (not burp)                                  mr bean

I thought My Family was good esp Roger the Dentist's but you forgot The Young Ones', Bottom, Blackadder, but I agree about the rest in NOT FUNNY...UTTER TURDS.



#43 Northern Sol

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 12:37 AM

It's not funny but BBC cosy like My Family....which I loved.

I liked the early series of that as well. Very funny especially Nick.

 

To me Miranda is reminiscent of the kind of traditional sitcoms centred around one socially inadequate male character who had strong women around them, except obviously the roles are reversed. If you think back to the comedies up to the eighties, I don't think that many were centred on the neuroses of a woman. Ally McBeal is the first I can think of that had a female character who was a bit of an idiot but essentially well meaning. Miranda reminds me of one or two of my female friends who aren't very good with men and seem to be constantly worrying about something trivial. It's very true to life and yet there aren't many comedies like it.


Edited by Northern Sol, 18 December 2013 - 12:38 AM.


#44 Johnoco

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 07:12 AM

Even amongst people who basically share the same humour there are different points of view. My niece is similar to me yet she went to see Russell Brand on Saturday in Bradford and was raving about it, yet I don't like him at all.
I don't think there is a right or wrong answer.

#45 Amber Avenger

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 09:00 AM

It's strange how there is a particular level of venom reserved for comedy that isn’t to one’s taste that you don’t really get with other forms of culture. If I recommended a film to someone and they didn’t like it, they’d probably just say “I wasn’t that keen”, but with comedy people almost take as much pride in what they don’t like as what they do like. I heard an interview with a comedian recently who made the point that it’s part of their job to stand up there with the objective of guaranteeing the audience a fantastic feeling, and if that feeling isn’t as fantastic as it should be, people feel robbed and let down. 

 

I do wonder if it’s a particularly British thing, people do seem incredibly defensive about their sense of humour especially as a defining quality. I can’t say I’m any different though.


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#46 gingerjon

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 09:23 AM

I liked the early series of that as well. Very funny especially Nick.

 

To me Miranda is reminiscent of the kind of traditional sitcoms centred around one socially inadequate male character who had strong women around them, except obviously the roles are reversed. If you think back to the comedies up to the eighties, I don't think that many were centred on the neuroses of a woman. Ally McBeal is the first I can think of that had a female character who was a bit of an idiot but essentially well meaning. Miranda reminds me of one or two of my female friends who aren't very good with men and seem to be constantly worrying about something trivial. It's very true to life and yet there aren't many comedies like it.

 

It can be very true to life in its characters but not in its setting or situations.  Which is one of the reasons why I think it works, and also a reason why I think it annoys the pants off some people.  It doesn't help (some people) that Miranda is incredibly posh and well-heeled - and doesn't do anything to hide that.   Still, I prefer that to mockney faux-"genuine" gurning. 


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#47 gingerjon

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 09:24 AM

It's strange how there is a particular level of venom reserved for comedy that isn’t to one’s taste that you don’t really get with other forms of culture. If I recommended a film to someone and they didn’t like it, they’d probably just say “I wasn’t that keen”, but with comedy people almost take as much pride in what they don’t like as what they do like. I heard an interview with a comedian recently who made the point that it’s part of their job to stand up there with the objective of guaranteeing the audience a fantastic feeling, and if that feeling isn’t as fantastic as it should be, people feel robbed and let down. 

 

 

 

I do wonder if it’s a particularly British thing, people do seem incredibly defensive about their sense of humour especially as a defining quality. I can’t say I’m any different though.

 

I can go from finding Russell Brand wonderfully refreshing and laugh out loud to funny to an annoying POS in the space of a single joke.


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#48 Amber Avenger

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 09:34 AM

It can be very true to life in its characters but not in its setting or situations.  Which is one of the reasons why I think it works, and also a reason why I think it annoys the pants off some people.

 

I wonder if this is why I don't really get on with that show. When asked to put my finger on why I didn't like it, I just found it too silly (although it is plesent enough, I wouldn't say I hated it). Strange though as I love stuff like Vic and Bob, but then they themselves are as stupid on screen as there situations.


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#49 Futtocks

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 10:03 AM

It can be very true to life in its characters but not in its setting or situations.  Which is one of the reasons why I think it works, and also a reason why I think it annoys the pants off some people.  It doesn't help (some people) that Miranda is incredibly posh and well-heeled - and doesn't do anything to hide that.   Still, I prefer that to mockney faux-"genuine" gurning. 

Some people hear a posh accent and the "keeping it real" class war barriers are immediately erected. Similarly, some people hear a non-London accent and the snob factor kicks in.

 

There are wonderfully funny people from all different backgrounds. In general, you'll find more university-educated people doing sketch shows, because there is a tradition for it in universities, most notably the Footlights. Straight stand-up comes from a broader base of backgrounds.


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#50 Northern Sol

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 12:22 PM

Some people hear a posh accent and the "keeping it real" class war barriers are immediately erected. Similarly, some people hear a non-London accent and the snob factor kicks in.

 

There are wonderfully funny people from all different backgrounds. In general, you'll find more university-educated people doing sketch shows, because there is a tradition for it in universities, most notably the Footlights. Straight stand-up comes from a broader base of backgrounds.

Ironically Miranda is "keeping it real". She comes from a posh background and she has set her comedy in that environment.

 

It's all the middle class kids from RADA acting like they came from a sink council estate that should flag a warning.



#51 Griff9of13

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 12:55 PM

Ironically Miranda is "keeping it real". She comes from a posh background and she has set her comedy in that environment.

 

It's all the middle class kids from RADA acting like they came from a sink council estate that should flag a warning.

 

The same criticism is often leveled at Richard Curtis. But if you see him interviewed he often relates events in his film to occasions in his real life. 


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#52 Kiwi-Capper_merged

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 07:44 PM

There was/is a poster who I seem to recall did/does stand up in Aus. It'd be interesting to hear their point of view on this. I imagine it can be quite a rewarding experience being on stage and making people laugh but if people start comparing you and your work to rectal tears and dog turds then does the enjoyment diminish? Do you even notice or care? Does it make you more determined to enjoy perfoming?



#53 Johnoco

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 09:34 PM

I think it was Alfies Thumb? Think I heard some of his stuff on MySpace years ago.

#54 Kiwi-Capper_merged

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 10:38 PM

I think it was Alfies Thumb? Think I heard some of his stuff on MySpace years ago.

 

Aye, That's the one I'm thinking of. It must have been a while ago if it was on MySPace.



#55 808tone

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 11:07 PM

There was/is a poster who I seem to recall did/does stand up in Aus. It'd be interesting to hear their point of view on this. I imagine it can be quite a rewarding experience being on stage and making people laugh but if people start comparing you and your work to rectal tears and dog turds then does the enjoyment diminish? Do you even notice or care? Does it make you more determined to enjoy perfoming?

???? I can only think Jack Whitelaw has lot's of powder to get him on stage and is filled with confidence as he is a upper class contacted unfunny kid.



#56 Andrew Vause

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 12:16 AM

comedy is a dead format almost, jack whatever is name is is a prime example, people used to get along in comedy by being genuinely funny, now it seems going to drama school and having the right connections gives you the right to make people laugh, sorry but none of these rambling smarmy clever trousers types raises me a smile,
 
FUNNY                                                                  NOT FUNNY
father ted                                                                miranda
emo philps                                                              noel fielding
the league of gentlemen                                         john bishop
vic and bob                                                             regular smarmy scripted panel show guests
Steptoe and son                                                     my family
early doors                                                             eddie izzard
the office                                                                ricky gervais  after the office
George and mildred                                               russel brand
psychoville                                                             Michael mc intyre
90s harry enfield stuff                                            friends
harry hill tv series (not burp)                                  mr bean

For me, you are 80 % the messiah. Psychoville as fumny as a ginger stepchild and Wilfred Brambell should have been hanged, the other analyses spot on.

#57 hindle xiii

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 02:18 AM

It's strange how there is a particular level of venom reserved for comedy that isn’t to one’s taste that you don’t really get with other forms of culture. If I recommended a film to someone and they didn’t like it, they’d probably just say “I wasn’t that keen”, but with comedy people almost take as much pride in what they don’t like as what they do like. I heard an interview with a comedian recently who made the point that it’s part of their job to stand up there with the objective of guaranteeing the audience a fantastic feeling, and if that feeling isn’t as fantastic as it should be, people feel robbed and let down. 

 

 

 

I do wonder if it’s a particularly British thing, people do seem incredibly defensive about their sense of humour especially as a defining quality. I can’t say I’m any different though.

Ahem...


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#58 Amber Avenger

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 08:57 AM

AHEM -  ;)

 

I can’t say I’m any different though.


Edited by Amber Avenger, 19 December 2013 - 09:00 AM.

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#59 tim2

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 12:13 PM

We all have people we find funny / not funny and it's OK to say that.

Saying that a comedian isn't funny just because you don't find them funny is a strange statement to make if they sell out arenas and get lots of telly work.

Comedians can also be offensive and still be funny - without bringing back the Manning debate (hopefully!) he was a good example.
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