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Utopia


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#1 OMEGA

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 12:32 AM

Watch the ITV documentary, UTOPIA, by John Pilger about Australian aparteit behaviour and the racism that's growing in his native Country.

Just one remarkable fact from the documentary
In the last 5 years in Australia the arrest ratio of blacks to white is 8X that of South Africa during the height of the aparteit years.

Gut wrenching stuff that had me exclaiming at my TV in indignation.

#2 Grollo

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 08:55 AM

I didn't see the program, but that arrest ratio wouldn't surprise me.

I recall listening to an Aussie radio station. The subject was attitudes to Indigenous Australians in sport. One of the presenters mentioned that his daughters best friend happened to be Aboriginal. The friend - who was described as a nice young lady - had been stopped several times by Melbourne police, whereas his daughter had never suffered such an indignity.


What you are aware of you are in control of; what you are not aware of is in control of you.

#3 Maximus Decimus

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 10:24 PM

I've yet to see it either but when I was travelled in Australia on a working holiday visa, I was shocked at the position of Aboriginies in society and the apparent open racism that many will show towards them.

It's probably not as black and white as it seems though. Not long after arriving I got a job at the Perth show working on the dodgems. Next to me, one of my friends was working on the tipping point machines and before he started he was warned by his boss to look out for aboriginies. We were obviously appalled but when they opened just like he said, gangs of aboriginal teenagers would come and try to lift the machines to cheat; it was a problem throughout the two weeks. Working on the dodgems, I found many aboriginals aggressive and one cocked a fist to punch me for simply asking how old his child was (a toddler about 4 years too young for the minimum age.)

In many cities I found the aboriginies held this position in society, often congregating in gangs, drinking on the streets and intimidating people. In Cairns a man refused to let me walk home alone after a night out because he said I would definitely get mugged by them. My wife was chased down the road by some in a similar situation.

When I returned home, I tried to explain it to people and the only way I could describe it was that they occupy a similar place in society that Chavs do in our society. That's why I'd be reluctant to call it purely an issue of racism. Many people are scared of them and associate them with crime and anti-social behaviour much as people will do over here when talking about Chavs. In Australia it just happens to be associated with a race of people whereas over here it doesn't.

Of course the travesty is that they have ended up occupying that part of society in the first place. However, now that they do, the authorities in Australia face an uphill battle in trying to reverse the changes.

#4 808tone

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 11:59 PM

I've yet to see it either but when I was travelled in Australia on a working holiday visa, I was shocked at the position of Aboriginies in society and the apparent open racism that many will show towards them.

It's probably not as black and white as it seems though. Not long after arriving I got a job at the Perth show working on the dodgems. Next to me, one of my friends was working on the tipping point machines and before he started he was warned by his boss to look out for aboriginies. We were obviously appalled but when they opened just like he said, gangs of aboriginal teenagers would come and try to lift the machines to cheat; it was a problem throughout the two weeks. Working on the dodgems, I found many aboriginals aggressive and one cocked a fist to punch me for simply asking how old his child was (a toddler about 4 years too young for the minimum age.)

In many cities I found the aboriginies held this position in society, often congregating in gangs, drinking on the streets and intimidating people. In Cairns a man refused to let me walk home alone after a night out because he said I would definitely get mugged by them. My wife was chased down the road by some in a similar situation.

When I returned home, I tried to explain it to people and the only way I could describe it was that they occupy a similar place in society that Chavs do in our society. That's why I'd be reluctant to call it purely an issue of racism. Many people are scared of them and associate them with crime and anti-social behaviour much as people will do over here when talking about Chavs. In Australia it just happens to be associated with a race of people whereas over here it doesn't.

Of course the travesty is that they have ended up occupying that part of society in the first place. However, now that they do, the authorities in Australia face an uphill battle in trying to reverse the changes.

I found that but with a few of the Lebanese in Sydney also a lot(not all) of the Chinese (in most countries I suppose) are silent racist's.


Edited by 808tone, 21 December 2013 - 12:24 PM.





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