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Book thread: what are you reading?


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#261 tomdooley

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 08:37 PM

He normally makes the effort to visit the places he is writing about to try and get a feel for what it might have been like. While his books are not really challenging reads and never likely to achieve the more prestigious awards reserved for the more weird and wonderful authors out there, I think he writes a gripping story and develops interesting characters while at least following historical events reasonably accurately. 

Try Patrick Obriens jack Aubrey  novels of the 18th cent british navy. As good as jane Austin



#262 Futtocks

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 08:47 PM

And, of course, George McDonald Fraser's 'Flashman' books. Well-researched and extensively footnoted and appendixed.

 

And he can write a battle scene better than just about anybody.


Between the optimist & the pessimist
The difference is quite droll:
The optimist sees the doughnut,
The pessimist sees the hole.


#263 Futtocks

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 04:58 PM

Trepidation! After a lot of humming and hemming and hawing, I have decided to try Maeve Gilmore's conclusion to her husband's 'Gormenghast' trilogy. Well, it was interesting, and worth a re-read sometime soon. She's a good writer, albeit no Mervyn Peake, but she catches some of the feel of the original books to an extent. It won't ruin 'Gormenghast' for fans. I rather liked it.

 

Next up, George Clinton's biography 'Brothas be, yo like George, ain't that Funkin' kinda hard on you?' I'm a few chapters in, and it is interesting and very readable, despite the mess of a title.


Between the optimist & the pessimist
The difference is quite droll:
The optimist sees the doughnut,
The pessimist sees the hole.


#264 Futtocks

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Posted 03 June 2015 - 11:37 AM

Next up, George Clinton's biography 'Brothas be, yo like George, ain't that Funkin' kinda hard on you?' I'm a few chapters in, and it is interesting and very readable, despite the mess of a title.

Finished this - a very good read.

 

Now dipping into Victor Lewis-Smith's entertainingly poisonous compilation 'TV Reviews'. Included is this gag: "As part of the overall settlement, Paul McCartney bought Heather a plane. Although I think she still uses a razor for the other leg."  :biggrin: 


Between the optimist & the pessimist
The difference is quite droll:
The optimist sees the doughnut,
The pessimist sees the hole.


#265 tomdooley

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Posted 03 June 2015 - 06:00 PM

claire Tomalin    charles Dickens biography.She leaves no stone unturned terrific read.

I have also read her samuel Pepys,and her thomas Hardy.

Love Hardy,s books.



#266 Geoff Lee

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Posted 03 June 2015 - 08:27 PM

I tend to spend much of my time writing novels rather than reading them but broke off recently for a while to read "Rugby Football: A United Game". It's a novel based around the idea what might have happened if the northern clubs had been in the majority in 1895. It should interest most people who have contributed above. No one yet however seems to have read my latest novel "Two Seasons" with its background of  "Work, Family, Old Friends and Rugby League". I would certainly be interested in some feedback.


www.geofflee.net for news of my novels, One Winter, One Spring, One Summer, One Autumn and Two Seasons. All are written against a strong Rugby League background, set in South Lancashire and inspired by the old saying about work: "They could write a book about this place. It would be a best seller".

 


#267 Victoria Dawson

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 12:47 PM

If you want something short to read for a few hours one afternoon, I can recommend 'Foster' by Claire Keegan. It's wonderfully written and leaves enough questions unanswered to capture your imagination.

Follow me on Twitter: @VDawsonRL


#268 Futtocks

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Posted 29 July 2015 - 11:31 PM

Paul Brickhill - The Dambusters. I haven't read this in decades, but the author's pacey style and eye for humorous anecdotes and dialogue works as well as ever. He mixes the cold-blooded heroism with tales of the entertainingly disgraceful fun that young men with little life-expectancy got up to after a few drinks.

 

After the Ruhr dams, the interlinked story of 617 Squadron and Barnes Wallis continues, with the V1 rocket bases, the Tirpitz raid and other campaigns, where they continued to re-write the rules on accurate and effective bombing, leading up to the use of the 'Tall Boy' and 'Grand Slam' earthquake bomb.


Between the optimist & the pessimist
The difference is quite droll:
The optimist sees the doughnut,
The pessimist sees the hole.


#269 Futtocks

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 08:40 AM

Timur Vermes - Look who's back. The year is 2011, and Adolf Hitler wakes up in Berlin, smelling of petrol, no older than he was at the end of WWII. In the modern world, he is mistaken for a brilliant impersonator who never breaks character and is given a slot on a TV comedy show.

 

This is a pretty funny satire, told entirely from Hitler's viewpoint, and well worth a read.


Between the optimist & the pessimist
The difference is quite droll:
The optimist sees the doughnut,
The pessimist sees the hole.


#270 Tiny Tim

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 10:18 AM

I am reading Catch 22 which I am really not getting in to.

 

It's not a book that I struggle to put down, but hopefully it will grow on me. 

 

I have other books waiting to be read but this was recommended to me so I will stick with it.

 

I am also reading a recent Wilbur Smith book on my Kindle which clearly wasn't written by him as the writing style is nothing like his previous books.



#271 C H Calthrop

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 01:16 PM

I am reading Catch 22 which I am really not getting in to.

 

It's not a book that I struggle to put down, but hopefully it will grow on me. 

 

I have other books waiting to be read but this was recommended to me so I will stick with it.

 

I am also reading a recent Wilbur Smith book on my Kindle which clearly wasn't written by him as the writing style is nothing like his previous books.

Shouldn't that be Kick 22?



#272 fieldofclothofgold

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 04:52 PM

the Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck .Fascinating it's 1930s and the dust bowl migrants from Oklahoma having to camp in shanty towns and the locals of California not very welcoming treating them like dirt and these were American citizens not illegal Mexicans
but you and I weve been through that and this is not our fate.
So let us so let us not talk falsely now.
The hour is getting late
FROM 2004,TO DO WHAT THIS CLUB HAS DONE,IF THATS NOT GREATNESSTHEN i DONT KNOW WHAT IS.

JAMIE PEACOCK

#273 ckn

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 05:14 PM

And, of course, George McDonald Fraser's 'Flashman' books. Well-researched and extensively footnoted and appendixed.

 

And he can write a battle scene better than just about anybody.

I meant to post this when it was in the news


Arguing with the forum trolls is like playing chess with a pigeon.  No matter how good you are, the bird will **** on the board and strut around like it won anyway





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