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#1 JohnM

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 11:13 PM

Between May and July 2007, England and Wales experienced the wettest conditions in 200 years. Nearly 50,000 households were affected. So far, about 5,000 homes are believed to have been affected in the current floods, although that figure is likely to rise of course.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-26145694


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#2 ckn

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 11:19 PM

Now it's a Tory/Lib Dem coalition in power and it's predominantly Tory and Lib Dem areas that are getting an extended soaking, many of those areas have MPs with majorities that wouldn't take too much more of a slip to UKIP to see sitting Tory MPs lose their seats and the Lib Dems are already packing their bags in their constituencies.  That means it's very convenient to point at the nasty Labour man in charge of the Environment Agency while quickly drawing curtains over the Coalition imposed cuts in this area.

 

If I remember 2007 rightly, there was very much an attitude in the media of "this is terrible, we must help" rather than the current attitude of "this is terrible, who is to blame!".  Maybe it's just me looking back with fuzzy hindsight.


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#3 JohnM

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:07 AM

Way back I suggested that once Surrey was hit, action would be taken. Not just because of politics but because of the demographic.  In 2007. despite the Labour govt,  it ddi not inconvenience middle ranking commuting civil servants. Maybe overstating the case, though I suspect the shrill wailing voices of the home counties were probably louder than the rather deeper voices of the north.

 

Of course, if this current weather really is because of climate change (not saying it isn't), then the remedy is going to be hugely expensive. Moving whole communities,  restricting energy use and emissions.  Flood defences will be the least of our worries.

 

I happen to trust the Met Office more than the civil service. I happen to trust the Environment Agency more than the civil service, too. 

 

But still,  goimng off todays situation, Hull, Doncaster and Tewksbury were  badly treated back in 2007, and that was a different govt.

 

.


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#4 Wolford6

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 09:07 AM


 

 

I happen to trust the Met Office more than the civil service. I happen to trust the Environment Agency more than the civil service, too. 

 

 

John, the Environment Agency has turned into the civil service.

 

  • In the waste industry, it is forming joint policies with HMRC to ensure borderline wastes are classed as Non-Hazardous (Landfill Tax £72 per tonne) rather than Inert (Landfill Tax £2.50 per tonne) even though there is no environmental difference if the waste is actually being sent to a Non-Hazardous landfill site.
  • In the scrap metal industry, the EA has accompanied HMRC and the police on raids to check that the dealer is not paying hard cash to clients. The yards may operate under EA Permits but the cash-for-scrap issue is not the EA's responsibility. It's akin to the EA running speed checks on dustbin wagons travelling on the public highway.

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#5 ckn

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 09:51 AM

 

John, the Environment Agency has turned into the civil service.

 

  • In the waste industry, it is forming joint policies with HMRC to ensure borderline wastes are classed as Non-Hazardous (Landfill Tax £72 per tonne) rather than Inert (Landfill Tax £2.50 per tonne) even though there is no environmental difference if the waste is actually being sent to a Non-Hazardous landfill site.
  • In the scrap metal industry, the EA has accompanied HMRC and the police on raids to check that the dealer is not paying hard cash to clients. The yards may operate under EA Permits but the cash-for-scrap issue is not the EA's responsibility. It's akin to the EA running speed checks on dustbin wagons travelling on the public highway.

 

If you think about it at a different level though... £72/tonne is a trivial amount of money for the right to pollute a bit of land for hundreds of years.  £2.50/tonne explains why so many councils are reluctant to invest in alternative mechanisms such as power-generating incinerators.

 

On scrap metal, if I had my way, I'd have it as a mandatory 10 year jail sentence for any scrappie found to have paid in cash for anything that has even the tiniest possibility of having been stolen.  There's so much theft, disruption and substantial loss done to industry because of metal theft, especially the railway system, that it deserves a punishment suitable for deterring the "innocent" scrappies from being fences for stolen goods.


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#6 Saintslass

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 10:04 PM

I think what marks out the current flooding from previous episodes, if memory serves, is their duration and the fact that in the south at any rate the over full water table has become a predominant feature.  I read on the BBC website that the water table is significant in providing the south with water via bore holes whereas the north of the UK is more reliant upon regular rainfall to sustain external reservoirs for provision of water supplies.

 

Previous flooding episodes, like the ones in 2012, have been severe but relatively short lived.  I don't remember any floods of the last decade or so going on for weeks without break as they have been doing down south.  The present situation brings into play other factors such as public health and replacement housing problems.


Edited by Saintslass, 12 February 2014 - 10:04 PM.


#7 JohnM

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 10:14 PM

coming soon.....

 

 

hose-pipe-ban-2012.jpg


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#8 Saintslass

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 10:16 PM

coming soon.....

 

 

hose-pipe-ban-2012.jpg

One of those had just been issued here in the north west in March 2012 then it all went pear shaped, or rather flood shaped from about April onwards!






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