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The Secrets of the Ballot Box


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#1 JohnM

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 04:45 PM

The secrets of the ballot box

 

Tories earn the most, Labour voters rent their home, Lib Dems are better-educated and almost all Ukip voters are white and retired


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#2 ckn

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 04:52 PM

I think the party that should be the most concerned from those figures is the Labour party.  If you look at their policies they're aiming right for the Tory vote that they're not going to get rather than shoring up their demographic first.  UKIP's policies seem about right on target for their voting demographic...


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#3 SE4Wire

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 05:15 PM

The similarity between Lib Dem and Tory demographics is quite interesting I reckon. Certainly implies Lib Dem voters are very much the "chattering classes" demographic.

#4 John Drake

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 10:07 AM

I think the party that should be the most concerned from those figures is the Labour party.  If you look at their policies they're aiming right for the Tory vote that they're not going to get rather than shoring up their demographic first.  UKIP's policies seem about right on target for their voting demographic...

 

Neither of the two remaining 'big' parties have enough core support to win them a General Election. That was demonstrated in 2010. They have to appeal to people who didn't vote for them last time. The more they play to their existing audience, the less chance they have of doing that.

 

Interesting bit of analysis on how many people do shift their votes between the various parties here:

 

The truth about Britain's volatile electorate
http://www.theguardi...e-election-2015


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#5 RidingPie

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 10:24 AM

Its interesting that the Mail paints this as a disaster for UKIP particularly with regards to voter ages, and it partly is, but its a least as big a concern for the conservatives. Nearly half their voters are 65+ 



#6 JohnM

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 10:33 AM

If the Conservatives thought about it,  it should not be a concern. They could ( and should) lose the  xenophobic tendency, not pander to it.   UKIP is strong here in Lincolnshire where they are very much afraid of being ravished in bed at night by sex-crazed devious and slimy  foreigners, UKIP support is strong amongst the young, too. 



#7 RidingPie

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 11:29 AM

If the Conservatives thought about it,  it should not be a concern. They could ( and should) lose the  xenophobic tendency, not pander to it.   UKIP is strong here in Lincolnshire where they are very much afraid of being ravished in bed at night by sex-crazed devious and slimy  foreigners, UKIP support is strong amongst the young, too. 

 

While I agree with you in that the conservatives should lose the xenophobic tendency (something I've often said myself), they currently don't seem like they want to. If the party was fiscally conservative and socially more liberal then I could happily contemplate voting for them myself. The problem they have is (and I believe Cameron may have said this in the past) they are a broad church. Just watching how the party lurched with the whole issue of gay marriage was uncomfortable, and blaming the Lib Dems for that one wasn't on since I distinctly remember it as one of David Cameron's modernising policies before the election (he said something like "I don't support gay marriage in spite of being a conservative, but rather because of it").

 

Likewise their constant infighting over Europe is not doing them any favours.

 

I guess this all comes back to me preferring having smaller parties and more coalitions. At least you know what you're voting for, even if you don't know what you'll get!

 

Also, from the link you posted originally your last point is wrong. UKIP support is not strong among the young. Only 9% of (potential) UKIP voters were 18-34 years old. Lower than labour on 33%, the Lib Dems on 29% and even the Conservatives on 19%



#8 gingerjon

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 11:35 AM

 

 

Also, from the link you posted originally your last point is wrong. UKIP support is not strong among the young. Only 9% of (potential) UKIP voters were 18-34 years old. Lower than labour on 33%, the Lib Dems on 29% and even the Conservatives on 19%

 

I think Mr M's point was that in Lincolnshire it is strong amongst the young.  

 

I've a friend who teaches at a secondary school in Lincs.  UKIP always win their mock elections.


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#9 RidingPie

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 11:44 AM

Ah fair enough!

 

Sorry for the misunderstanding then.



#10 JohnM

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 12:06 PM

I think Mr M's point was that in Lincolnshire it is strong amongst the young.  

 

I've a friend who teaches at a secondary school in Lincs.  UKIP always win their mock elections.

 

 

and real elections, too! 

 

"People in Boston, Lincolnshire, have told the BBC why they think the UK Independence Party made gains in Thursday's county council elections. UKIP made gains across Lincolnshire, ensuring the Conservatives lost overall control. Three members of the same family won seats for the party in Boston. Immigration is a big issue in Boston, which the 2011 census revealed had the largest number of non-British EU passport holders outside of London. UKIP won five of the seven seats in the town."



#11 RidingPie

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 12:29 PM

come on John, even Lib Dems still win some council elections!

 

That said I don't think its a bad thing having a fourth 'real' party, even though I disagree with many of their policies. I always believe people should vote for what they want and not the "least bad option" as has seemed to be the case recently.



#12 gingerjon

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 12:55 PM

and real elections, too! 

 

"People in Boston, Lincolnshire, have told the BBC why they think the UK Independence Party made gains in Thursday's county council elections. UKIP made gains across Lincolnshire, ensuring the Conservatives lost overall control. Three members of the same family won seats for the party in Boston. Immigration is a big issue in Boston, which the 2011 census revealed had the largest number of non-British EU passport holders outside of London. UKIP won five of the seven seats in the town."

 

To be fair, Boston has always liked its single issue parties.


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#13 JohnM

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 01:09 PM

It not just the road that has bypassed Boston!   






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