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Gardening help


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14 replies to this topic

#1 Phil

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 04:10 PM

New house is way up on't moors got a little garden but I reckon the soil is quite thin and poor.

Going to dig some horse manure in but what kind of plants will do well in a high and windy environment?
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#2 terrywebbisgod

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 04:24 PM

New house is way up on't moors got a little garden but I reckon the soil is quite thin and poor.

Going to dig some horse manure in but what kind of plants will do well in a high and windy environment?

Astro turf.


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#3 WearyRhino

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 05:52 PM

http://www.alpinegar...ety.net/plants/

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#4 JohnM

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 06:04 PM

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#5 Stevo

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 06:13 PM

Have you got room to lay some hedging to break the wind up? Blackthorn or Hawthorn would be OK I think and will make a big difference once they are established.

 

Some plants/ shrubs that are pretty hardy and don't mind a bit of cold/ exposure (though check your soil type):

 

Most heathers

Mock orange

Hardy geraniums

Evergreen dianthus

Lilacs

Dogwood

Cotoneaster

 

Without wanting to sound all Monty Don/ n0bbish about it, wind can be a pain - but it can also add movement to a garden: see if there are any grasses or bamboos that'll work on your site, they will look cool blowing about when the weather comes in.


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#6 Red Willow

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 08:16 PM

Think grey/silver leaves are good in these conditions. If the soil is that poor it might be worth considering raised beds. Like others suggest wind breaks are probably worth considering. How much sun does the garden receive? 



#7 Phil

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 08:24 PM

Think grey/silver leaves are good in these conditions. If the soil is that poor it might be worth considering raised beds. Like others suggest wind breaks are probably worth considering. How much sun does the garden receive?


It gets plenty of sun not really enough room for planting a windbreak/ hedge may well look at a selection of heathers and alpines
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#8 Wolford6

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 01:03 AM

Have you bought the horse manure yet?

 

In a previous existence, following a major reorganisation,  I was appointed to a revised managerial position. My responsibilities included being placed in charge of a small landscaping and horticultural unit. **

 

One of the valuable things I learned about horticulture was the unit manager would not to use horse manure on his projects. Horses, unlike cows, eat everything that grows and their dung spreads weeds.

 

 

**Obviously, this being local government:

 - I had no experience of horticulture and knew knack all about it, but that unit was deemed not big  enough for the very able bloke in direct charge of the section to be given a full managerial responsibility and position.

 - I told him to get on with running his section and give me a shout whenever he encountered a problem that might need my assistance and input. This input basically evolved into getting to know the manual workers in the unit, visiting their operational sites every couple of weeks to monitor progress, having a couple of hours discussion with the manager every week and signing his expenses claims & budget applications. I trusted him implicitly.

 - After a discreet period, I said my other duties were monopolising my time (this was true) and recommended that, as the horticultural officer was doing a really good job, he should be given full recognition and responsibility i.e. upgraded.

 - The Chief Officer agreed that the horticultural unit manager was doing an excellent job with a minimal input from me and that I had more than enough on my plate with running my main unit.

 - The result was that overall responsibility for the the horticultural unit was transferred to a different section, where the horticultural officer carried on doing exactly the same full scope of work  for his new principal officer and got no financial recognition for doing so.

 - Nobody said life was meant to be fair.


Edited by Wolford6, 24 March 2014 - 01:14 AM.

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#9 Futtocks

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 11:18 AM

Not sure about aesthetic gardening, but if you're planting to eat, here goes. From memories of growing up on top of a limestone hill with thin topsoil, we did okay with peas and strawberries (if the birds didn't get them) but carrots/root veg gave meagre returns. Spuds didn't actually do too bad, but they were small.

 

Herbs - mint and a bay tree both flourished, and the latter is a rather attractive small tree. Rosemary's a tough plant which should do okay.


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#10 Wolford6

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 11:47 AM

If you plant mint, plant it in a pot. Otherwise it spreads in the ground like wildfire.

 

Daffodils and tulips grow in any soil and come back every year.

 

Elephant grass will do the same but knackers mower blades.

 

Tree-wise; ash and birch will grow in anything but birch is really bad if you get hay fever.

 

If you intend staying there for many years, concrete works out pretty cheap. ;)


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#11 Futtocks

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 12:15 PM

If you plant mint, plant it in a pot. Otherwise it spreads in the ground like wildfire.

Yes, we found that out! You'd have to mix a lot of Mojitos to get through our mint bush.


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#12 Tiny Tim

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 12:17 PM

Might be worth setting up a couple of composters too so that you have a good supply of homemade compost to help improve the soil quality.

 

We have a green waste composter (garden and vegetable kitchen waste) but also a composter that can take all kitchen waste such as meat, fish, bones etc. I use a shredder in my home office and the shreddings go into the composters too.

 

From experience raspberry canes will grow pretty much anywhere and spread well, garlic seems pretty resilient too.



#13 longboard

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 11:10 PM

New house is way up on't moors got a little garden but I reckon the soil is quite thin and poor.

Going to dig some horse manure in but what kind of plants will do well in a high and windy environment?

 

Tough plants. Presumably you have acid soil there. Hardy perennials such as true geraniums, bulbs, tubers, corms for the different seasons, and low growing bushes are probably good bets for the site. Alpine strawberries would probably go well and they are very tough. It's a good area for rhubarb and also bilberries!

 

Look at the gardens in the area and what is growing well.

 

Composted manure is probably a better bet than horse manure in terms of fewer weeds. Tommy Topsoil at Hubberton sell it. Not all plants like rich soils eg some herbs.



#14 Exiled Townie

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 12:23 PM

 

 

Without wanting to sound all Monty Don/ n0bbish about it, wind can be a pain - but it can also add movement to a garden: see if there are any grasses or bamboos that'll work on your site, they will look cool blowing about when the weather comes in.

 

Is your garden big enough for a bit of a wildflower garden.  Sister in law lives halfway up a mountain near Buttermere and its almost constant wind (the valley, not her).  She made a patch of her garden as wildflowers and grasses.  When wind blows, as Stevo says above, grasses and flowers look great blowing in the wind.


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#15 gazza77

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 07:36 PM

Composted manure is probably a better bet than horse manure in terms of fewer weeds. Tommy Topsoil at Hubberton sell it. Not all plants like rich soils eg some herbs.


You're right and Tommy Topsoil does sell good stuff and is local. I do use quite a lot of horse manure however as it's good for veg and I have a free supply of more than I could ever use.

I can only comment on veg as it's all I grow but I've had carrots, onions, garlic, cabbage, kale, purple broccoli, salad, spuds, peas and leeks without any issue. The growing season is only short though due to the elevation and exposure in Old Town so it helps to plant seeds indoors in many cases to get them going.

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