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See the mice in their million hordes


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#21 EdinburghExile

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 12:29 PM

Paragraphs man!



#22 Gerri Monside

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 12:37 PM

Red Dwarf reference.  I think that Oxford likes to use cultural references of varying levels of obscurity although none of them seem to help him get his point across.  I seem to remember one thread where he said that anyone on here should be ashamed at not knowing that Dennis Waterman once played Dally Messenger in a TV film.

*pedant mode* It was Harold Wagstaffe IIRC *pedant mode off*


It's an easy kick for the lad but, as we say in Rugby League, there's no easy kicks.

 

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#23 bearman

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 12:40 PM

Is Eric Cantona posting on here now?
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#24 Griff

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 07:39 AM

*pedant mode* It was Harold Wagstaffe IIRC *pedant mode off*

 

It was Albert Goldthorpe, actually.


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#25 Gerri Monside

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 04:00 PM

It was Albert Goldthorpe, actually.

Ah indeed.  I've been corrected on this & unpedant my pedant mode. Although due to autocorrect, one corrector told me it was Mapplethorpe.... which would have been very interesting indeed. 


It's an easy kick for the lad but, as we say in Rugby League, there's no easy kicks.

 

@IanLancaster65

 

 


#26 Gregory Peccary

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 09:53 PM

Look at those cavemen go.



#27 gogledd

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 10:56 PM

I've read through all of the tread and still don't get the "Life on Mars" reference!



#28 The Parksider

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 09:31 AM

I've read through all of the tread and still don't get the "Life on Mars" reference!

 

Bowie is remixing older concepts in "Life On Mars". We should first identify his source material. His vague dissatisfaction with "lawmen" (read "The Man") and the anti-patriotism of "Rule Britannia" (a British nationalist anthem) positions Bowie squarely within the countercultural movement of the '60s and '70s. His usage of Mickey Mouse (in "Mickey Mouse has grown up a cow") as an emblem of capitalist sprawl is particularly helpful in identifying Bowie as a member of the intellectual left. The line, "Now the workers have struck for fame," could be a reference to the Disney animators' strike of 1941. While the strike didn't affect the public's relationship with Disney very much, it earned Disney the cold shoulder of leftist critics who would thereafter call Disney the "mouse factory." That criticism contains two crucial perspectives: a Marxist point of view, and an anti-consumerist point of view. Given the proletarian aesthetic created by Bowie's invocation of workers striking for fame, John Lennon (or V.I. Lenin), and "the mice in their million hordes," it may sound easy to call "Life On Mars?" a Marxist, anti-capitalist song. Bowie definitely sounds like a Marxist when he sings about striking workers, "lawmen beating up the wrong guy," and the "mice in their million hordes" sweeping over Western Europe ("from Ibiza to the Norfolk Broads").

 

Try this taken from a Muso's lyrical analysis.....Sounds like the point is Mr. Koukash's unwelcome capitalism, makes his dissentors sound like Marxists who resent such potential spending?

 

Do I win a cigar Oxford??

 

For me Koukash is welcome to be a capitalist and spend his fortune on RL in as many positive ways he can. I suspect there's nothing positive in chasing top RU/NRL stars who aren't going to come and certainly nothing positive in creating wage inflation in the game. 



#29 Futtocks

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 10:09 AM

Ah indeed.  I've been corrected on this & unpedant my pedant mode. Although due to autocorrect, one corrector told me it was Mapplethorpe.... which would have been very interesting indeed. 

Mapplethorpe!   :O  :biggrin:

 

Here's the IMDB for the film in question 'The first Kangaroos': http://www.imdb.com/..._=tt_cl_sm#cast

 

Fans of the sci-fi series 'Farscape' may recognise the name Wayne Pygram (aka Scorpius) in the cast. I also notice the surname 'Giltinan' there too.


A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#30 latchford albion

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 03:22 PM

Bowie is remixing older concepts in "Life On Mars". We should first identify his source material. His vague dissatisfaction with "lawmen" (read "The Man") and the anti-patriotism of "Rule Britannia" (a British nationalist anthem) positions Bowie squarely within the countercultural movement of the '60s and '70s. His usage of Mickey Mouse (in "Mickey Mouse has grown up a cow") as an emblem of capitalist sprawl is particularly helpful in identifying Bowie as a member of the intellectual left. The line, "Now the workers have struck for fame," could be a reference to the Disney animators' strike of 1941. While the strike didn't affect the public's relationship with Disney very much, it earned Disney the cold shoulder of leftist critics who would thereafter call Disney the "mouse factory." That criticism contains two crucial perspectives: a Marxist point of view, and an anti-consumerist point of view. Given the proletarian aesthetic created by Bowie's invocation of workers striking for fame, John Lennon (or V.I. Lenin), and "the mice in their million hordes," it may sound easy to call "Life On Mars?" a Marxist, anti-capitalist song. Bowie definitely sounds like a Marxist when he sings about striking workers, "lawmen beating up the wrong guy," and the "mice in their million hordes" sweeping over Western Europe ("from Ibiza to the Norfolk Broads").

 

Try this taken from a Muso's lyrical analysis.....Sounds like the point is Mr. Koukash's unwelcome capitalism, makes his dissentors sound like Marxists who resent such potential spending?

 

Do I win a cigar Oxford??

 

For me Koukash is welcome to be a capitalist and spend his fortune on RL in as many positive ways he can. I suspect there's nothing positive in chasing top RU/NRL stars who aren't going to come and certainly nothing positive in creating wage inflation in the game. 

 

Close but no cigar.  

 

My own pet theory was that Oxford was referring to a little known fact of industrial relations in the 1970s.  The TUC, under the de facto leadership of Jack Jones and Hugh Scanlon, had reacted to the release of John Lennon's album, Plastic Ono Band, by demanding he and Bowie collaborate on a song.  This long running dispute was finally settled three years later, when Lennon sang backing vocals and received a writing credit on Fame.  Thus the post was a call for the TUC today to demand Red Hall to abolish the salary cap and allow Koukash to sign the cream of Rugby Union talent (or Danny Cipriani).

 

That theory was blown out of the water by Oxford himself, when he said that for 'mice' we should read 'lemmings'.  He clearly has a version of an Enigma Machine through which he typed the post.  All we need is a team of code-breakers led by a modern day Alan Turing to decipher it.

Mapplethorpe!   :O  :biggrin:

 

Here's the IMDB for the film in question 'The first Kangaroos': http://www.imdb.com/..._=tt_cl_sm#cast

 

Fans of the sci-fi series 'Farscape' may recognise the name Wayne Pygram (aka Scorpius) in the cast. I also notice the surname 'Giltinan' there too.

 

Maybe this was how RL got its Stonewall award - someone there thought that we had the Robert Mapplethorpe medal.



#31 OMEGA

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 06:06 PM

"See the mice In their million hordes" is a line from David Bowies 'Life on Mars'
It's all about the illusion of life, the fact that we all believe we're different and the slow realisation that we're not, the desperation at the state of the world and the hope that it could be better elsewhere.

What's that got to do with Marwan Koucash?

#32 Johnoco

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 07:08 PM

I reckon Marwan is more of a T-Rex fan in all probability.

No I don't care if you're if you're into different bands

No cause for so much hatred, I'm just a different man

Pull off that cover, I will too, and learn to understand

With music deep inside we'll make world unity our plan

 

7 Seconds -Walk Together, Rock Together


#33 gutterfax

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 02:51 AM

I reckon Marwan is more of a T-Rex fan in all probability.

"Bang a gong" to that brother

#34 terrywebbisgod

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 05:38 AM

Going by Oxfords recent posts ,it seems it's more"use a bong" than "bang a gong"


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#35 Derwent

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 06:27 AM

I reckon Marwan is more of a T-Rex fan in all probability.


Alvin Stardust I reckon, "come on and be my Koukash ooo......"

I'll get me coat.

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#36 Ackroman

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 07:41 AM

More of a Slade fan because I reckon it's Christmas everyday in his house and in Oxfords head.



#37 Futtocks

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 10:19 AM



I reckon Marwan is more of a T-Rex fan in all probability.

Not this band, then?


A mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work if it isn’t open. Frank Zappa (1940 - 1993)


#38 Viking Warrior

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 08:24 PM

no doubt he will be on twitter again tonight moaning bout his team 


"Why is Napoleon crying ?" said one sailor to the other, "poor ###### thinks he's being exiled to st helens" came the reply.



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