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Big Brother is here: Emergency surveillance bill passes in 1 day


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8 replies to this topic

#1 John Drake

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 04:32 PM

Emergency surveillance bill to be fast-tracked despite 49 MPs' opposition

http://www.theguardi...cked-parliament

Forty-nine MPs have voted against rushing the government's emergency surveillance legislation through all its Commons stages in just one day.
A deal between the three major parties, however, secured the fast-track timetable by 436 votes to 49, despite accusations from one Labour MP that the move amounted to "democratic banditry resonant of a rogue state".

 

The bill requires internet and phone companies to store the communications data generated by phone calls, email, texts and internet use for 12 months and make it accessible to police and security services.

 

MPs themselves, and Lords, are apparently exempt. No wonder so few of them were remotely bothered about scrutinising this bill before voting to apply it to the rest of us.


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#2 tonyXIII

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 04:48 PM

Emergency surveillance bill to be fast-tracked despite 49 MPs' opposition

http://www.theguardi...cked-parliament

Forty-nine MPs have voted against rushing the government's emergency surveillance legislation through all its Commons stages in just one day.
A deal between the three major parties, however, secured the fast-track timetable by 436 votes to 49, despite accusations from one Labour MP that the move amounted to "democratic banditry resonant of a rogue state".

 

The bill requires internet and phone companies to store the communications data generated by phone calls, email, texts and internet use for 12 months and make it accessible to police and security services.

 

MPs themselves, and Lords, are apparently exempt. No wonder so few of them were remotely bothered about scrutinising this bill before voting to apply it to the rest of us.

 

If that is so, it is a flagrant abuse of power.

 

The saying is that a government can only rule with the consent of the people. How long until the consent runs out? And what happens then? Or do they know and this is a move to prevent the revolution gaining traction?


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#3 l'angelo mysterioso

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 05:00 PM

big brother has always been here.

It's now much easier for it to do what it does.

 

This act has cross party support and is here to stay.


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#4 ckn

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 05:10 PM

This is no different to the state of the law two weeks ago, it's a reworking of the law to comply with an ECJ judgement that made the old law unusable. Nothing much to see here.

The old law as it stood provided secondary evidence in many cases proving someone was accessing websites that help prove the state's case. For example, there was one case last year where a guy "accidentally" killed his wife by CO poisoning but the prosecution were able to bring evidence that he had been searching the internet in previous weeks for how long animals take to die from deliberate CO poisoning of rabbit runs, etc.

I don't see a problem with this law except for the MP/Lords exemption.

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#5 Wolford6

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 05:43 PM

Does anyone really think that this surveillance hasn't been going on anyway?


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#6 The Future is League

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 06:23 PM

Emergency surveillance bill to be fast-tracked despite 49 MPs' opposition

http://www.theguardi...cked-parliament

Forty-nine MPs have voted against rushing the government's emergency surveillance legislation through all its Commons stages in just one day.
A deal between the three major parties, however, secured the fast-track timetable by 436 votes to 49, despite accusations from one Labour MP that the move amounted to "democratic banditry resonant of a rogue state".

 

The bill requires internet and phone companies to store the communications data generated by phone calls, email, texts and internet use for 12 months and make it accessible to police and security services.

 

MPs themselves, and Lords, are apparently exempt. No wonder so few of them were remotely bothered about scrutinising this bill before voting to apply it to the rest of us.

Its always been the same. One law for the have's. Another law for the have nots.



#7 Bedford Roughyed

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 08:17 PM

This is no different to the state of the law two weeks ago, it's a reworking of the law to comply with an ECJ judgement that made the old law unusable. Nothing much to see here.
 

 

Not quite.  Clauses 4 and 5 are new legislation sneaked onto this bill.  So completely new stuff has been rushed through.


With the best, thats a good bit of PR, though I would say the Bedford team, theres, like, you know, 13 blokes who can get together at the weekend to have a game together, which doesnt point to expansion of the game. Point, yeah go on!

#8 Griff9of13

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 08:57 PM

I am always very wary of any legislation that is rushed through without the usual checks and balances proper debate provides. Rushed laws are usually bad laws.
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#9 John Drake

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 09:39 AM

I am always very wary of any legislation that is rushed through without the usual checks and balances proper debate provides. Rushed laws are usually bad laws.

 

Exactly.

 

And this was rushed through on the same day as a major Cabinet reshuffle as well, guaranteeing it would receive little scrutiny in the media either, who were too busy dealing with more heavyweight issues like the fashion sense of female Cabinet members.


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