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What Are You Listening To - The Reckoning

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On Saturday night I was on bar duty at Louth Jazz Club..which meant I got to listen to this suprise guest.

Jack Broadbent: http://www.jackbroadbent.co.uk

So good I bought his CD and I'm still listening to it now. He's all over Spotify and YouTube, too.

Bloody brilliant

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On Saturday night I was on bar duty at Louth Jazz Club..which meant I got to listen to this suprise guest.

Jack Broadbent: http://www.jackbroadbent.co.uk

So good I bought his CD and I'm still listening to it now. He's all over Spotify and YouTube, too.

Bloody brilliant

Is jazz an age related interested not far off 50 and i cannot stop buying Wes Montgomery records

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Already a brass band player for a number of years, my jazz  education began when I was 13, supposed to be  doing my homework in my bedroom but instead was listening to Voice of America on shortwave. That's when I first heard Count Basie  - The Kid from Red Bankhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rEUBwiezayE

 

My first vinyl  LP was bought circa 1960/61 when I was 14/15 - Zoot Simms/Al Cohn - A Night at the Half Note. Still can play it in my mind, or listen to it on Spotify 

 

Also have this on vinyl in the garage. The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery, bought circa 1962/63  Polka Dots and Moonbeamshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGrurfqBNDA

 

Sadly, all my vinyls are worn/damaged in some way.

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Having listened to Tom Jones play it on Jools Holland, St James Infirmary Blues Louis Armstrong

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Is jazz an age related interested not far off 50 and i cannot stop buying Wes Montgomery records

I've got 10 Wes albums but I started buying them when I was 18 - I'm a guitarist though and Wes was, by jazz standards, a big-selling artist back then. These days I prefer Jim Hall or Kenny Burrell for that style. My favourite Wes albums would be, as mentioned above, The Incredible Guitar.........., Dynamic Duo with Jimmy Smith, Wes Montgomery Trio: A Dynamic New Sound.

 

MI0002458719.jpg?partner=allrovi.com

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As I said my Wes Montgomery collection is growing just picked up a mono copy of Tequila on Verve. It's been of a progression for me I started to gain interest after years of ignoring Steely Dan and then all of a sudden found what a great band they were, I read an article on there influences in music and while digging I came across a Blue Note double album of Wes Montgomery the rest is history.

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Wes can be a bit of a divisive figure among jazz people. Some think that from about 1964 onwards he was just phoning it in on his albums. This applies to most of his hits. most of the stuff with orchestral backing and most of the stuff recorded on A&M.

 

Much of this comes down to the perverse snobbery against any jazz player who sells more than 10 albums. Kind of Blue has sold 5 million copies but no-one is calling Miles Davis a sellout.

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Wes can be a bit of a divisive figure among jazz people. Some think that from about 1964 onwards he was just phoning it in on his albums. This applies to most of his hits. most of the stuff with orchestral backing and most of the stuff recorded on A&M.

Much of this comes down to the perverse snobbery against any jazz player who sells more than 10 albums. Kind of Blue has sold 5 million copies but no-one is calling Miles Davis a sellout.

I have a copy of California Dreaming I must say it wasn't what I expected when I first heard it.

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Go on then... as it's new years day...

DSOTM AND WYWH......

40 odd years old.... and still brilliant

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The Beatles are on Spotify rejoice !! I'm currently listening to George Harrison live in Japan

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Whilst I have been given copies of Sgt pepper, the white album and abbey rd, in all my years I've never been sufficiently enthused to buy anything by the popular beat combo from Liverpool.

Ok I don't knock em and I appreciate their massive world wide appeal... and I do like some of their stuff.... but they were never really my scene....

Odd really. ... cos the rest of the world still goes loopy over them....

Think I may give norwegian wood a blast... It might prompt me to play the album

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My favourite Beatles track wasn't written by L&M and neither of them played lead guitar on it. It is of course While My Guitar Gently Weeps, written by George Harrison and featuring the uncredited Eric Clapton. Great song.

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Jeff Healey gives that track a right seeing to.... great guitar work...

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Whilst I have been given copies of Sgt pepper, the white album and abbey rd, in all my years I've never been sufficiently enthused to buy anything by the popular beat combo from Liverpool.

Ok I don't knock em and I appreciate their massive world wide appeal... and I do like some of their stuff.... but they were never really my scene....

Odd really. ... cos the rest of the world still goes loopy over them....

Think I may give norwegian wood a blast... It might prompt me to play the album

I reckon I'm a bit older than you.  I remember the first time I heard the Beatles.  In those days in Yorkshire we got Granada TV from Manchester, and the local news programme was called People and Places, introduced by Bill Grundy.  There was an item about this band from Liverpool.  They played Love Me Do!  I've been a fan ever since. At the time the charts were full of stuff by Frank Ifield, Craig Douglas, Jimmy Rogers and Pat Boone, they were like a breath of fresh air.  There is something about the blend of Lennon and McCartney's voices that is somehow magic.  The whole was much better than the sum of the parts. Neither of them singly was a patch on them together.

Edited by Trojan

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Go on then... as it's new years day...

DSOTM AND WYWH......

40 odd years old.... and still brilliant

 

Oh indeed, a rare indulgence for me, and I rather like Roger Waters Film version of Comfortably Numb on his recent Wall tour - gives the song some context!

Edited by distantdog

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Whilst I have been given copies of Sgt pepper, the white album and abbey rd, in all my years I've never been sufficiently enthused to buy anything by the popular beat combo from Liverpool.

Ok I don't knock em and I appreciate their massive world wide appeal... and I do like some of their stuff.... but they were never really my scene....

Odd really. ... cos the rest of the world still goes loopy over them....

Think I may give norwegian wood a blast... It might prompt me to play the album

 

I bought my one and only Beatles album - Sgt Peppers - in the 90s, for sentiment more than musical interest. I was aware of them but my first albums were Yardbirds and Stones. My general feelings re: Fab Four, mirror yours - detached appreciation more than anything.

 

I started playing guitar in 1966. That year The Easybeats did Friday on my mind and Sorry, Stones did 19th Nervous Breakdown, the Who did I'm a boy and Substitute, the Kinks did I'm Not Like Everybody Else, and that's just the Brits.

 

The place in musical history accorded to the Beatles is way out of proportion to the reality of the time.

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I bought my one and only Beatles album - Sgt Peppers - in the 90s, for sentiment more than musical interest. I was aware of them but my first albums were Yardbirds and Stones. My general feelings re: Fab Four, mirror yours - detached appreciation more than anything.

 

I started playing guitar in 1966. That year The Easybeats did Friday on my mind and Sorry, Stones did 19th Nervous Breakdown, the Who did I'm a boy and Substitute, the Kinks did I'm Not Like Everybody Else, and that's just the Brits.

 

The place in musical history accorded to the Beatles is way out of proportion to the reality of the time.

Bear in mind though Ducky just how much good stuff the Beatles turned out in a short career. They also made some rubbish but that's outweighed, for me, by the better. I think it was 1967 when they were at their most prolific. Each to their own, obviously. I'm no fan of much of the Beatles solo efforts. I struggle to listen to much of Lennon especially Imagine. A dirge with twee lyrics IMO and McCartney is 25 years (at least) past his sell by date.

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The Beatles are on Spotify rejoice !! I'm currently listening to George Harrison live in Japan

Don't forget to send us a postcard.

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I reckon I'm a bit older than you. I remember the first time I heard the Beatles. In those days in Yorkshire we got Granada TV from Manchester, and the local news programme was called People and Places, introduced by Bill Grundy. There was an item about this band from Liverpool. They played Love Me Do! I've been a fan ever since. At the time the charts were full of stuff by Frank Ifield, Craig Douglas, Jimmy Rogers and Pat Boone, they were like a breath of fresh air. There is something about the blend of Lennon and McCartney's voices that is somehow magic. The whole was much better than the sum of the parts. Neither of them singly was a patch on them together.

yes Alan, I think you are older than me and of course what happens in our youth influences a lot of our future choices.

Almost all of my close friends are older than me and I suppose that's reflected in my choices too.

Free were my first great music heros though I did like a lots of earlier stuff..

My later teens were right in the punk era... again, a genre that completely changed the game.

So the Beatles to me were somewhat 'old hat' when I was 17/18....

As Farmduck says, there was so much other stuff by bands I did really like released at the same time that had much more impact on me.... stuff I have since bought....

The Beatles simply didn't really do it for me. Perhaps I was born too late in 1960!

Edited by Robin Evans

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I reckon I'm a bit older than you.  I remember the first time I heard the Beatles.  In those days in Yorkshire we got Granada TV from Manchester, and the local news programme was called People and Places, introduced by Bill Grundy.  There was an item about this band from Liverpool.  They played Love Me Do!  I've been a fan ever since. At the time the charts were full of stuff by Frank Ifield, Craig Douglas, Jimmy Rogers and Pat Boone, they were like a breath of fresh air.  There is something about the blend of Lennon and McCartney's voices that is somehow magic.  The whole was much better than the sum of the parts. Neither of them singly was a patch on them together.

Exactly!

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Present from the wife Elbow ... The Seldom Seen Kid 2 X 45rpm 180grm vinyl, sonically one of the best pressings I've ever heard.

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