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voteronniegibbs

spuggies and jackdaws and hedgehogs and frogs

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We put out sunflower and nyger  seeds for the finches and have loads of goldfinches plus a couple of Bullfinches . We have the usual green and chaffinches as well. a small fledgling gold finch flew into my kitchen window and knocked it's self silly. Husband picked it up and put it somewhere safe under the blueberry bush tiny little thing but very nice.

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Goldfinches seem t have grown in number in recent years, maybe because of more people putting out sunflower seeds, nyger seeds etc. I see them in large numbers in my garden and out and about, right up to the moorland edges. Cracking looking birds.

first time i have seen a goldfinch in my area standish wigan, plenty other finches though, i thought we were a bit to far north for goldfinches?

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We put out sunflower and nyger  seeds for the finches and have loads of goldfinches plus a couple of Bullfinches . We have the usual green and chaffinches as well. a small fledgling gold finch flew into my kitchen window and knocked it's self silly. Husband picked it up and put it somewhere safe under the blueberry bush tiny little thing but very nice.

Seen a couple of bullfinches near Melbourne on the Hull to York back road recently. They really are striking looking creatures.

 

Seen (and heard) a lot of yellowhammers recently. Apparently they're a rare sight in some parts of the country but they're commonplace in the East Yorkshire countryside.

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first time i have seen a goldfinch in my area standish wigan, plenty other finches though, i thought we were a bit to far north for goldfinches?

 

Missus, they are resident a lot further north than Standish right up to the north of Scotland. They are not resident in N West Scotland though.

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Seen a couple of bullfinches near Melbourne on the Hull to York back road recently. They really are striking looking creatures.

 

Seen (and heard) a lot of yellowhammers recently. Apparently they're a rare sight in some parts of the country but they're commonplace in the East Yorkshire countryside.

 

Aye the bullies are attractive birds.

 

Yellowhammers are in serious decline in much of the country, which is partly attributable to the grubbing out of hedgerows and bushes in the past and also changes in farming practices. There's only a few of them in Calderdale now.

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Coming back from Featherstone today on the coach ( wish I'd never gone!)

I saw a hare in a field.

I don't think I've ever seen one before.

Sure sign I'm a townee?

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Sparrowhawk in Coniston this morning (that's the Coniston on the Hull to Bridlington road, not the one in the Lake District).

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just before nightfall I was out with the dogs yesterday, and a heron flew over. Not that rare, but against the setting sun it was stunningly graceful.

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We have a small bird of prey hanging round the garden, think it may be  a merlin

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just before nightfall I was out with the dogs yesterday, and a heron flew over. Not that rare, but against the setting sun it was stunningly graceful.

There is a large heronry about 500 yards from my house, no one within about 3 miles radius from here have fish in their ponds unless they keep a net over them

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Coming back from Featherstone today on the coach ( wish I'd never gone!)

I saw a hare in a field.

I don't think I've ever seen one before.

Sure sign I'm a townee?

We used to have a large number of brown hares round here, but that was probably because the Waterloo Cup was held in the area. Since the ban on hare coursing I've only seen the odd one. Sad really; watching them box in the spring was always enjoyable.

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Walking to the dentist this morning from home a red squirrel ran out in front of me and over a garden wall. A very good sign to see one so far from the nature reserve as it's only a few years since we thought we were going to lose the whole colony to squirrel pox.

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We used to have a large number of brown hares round here, but that was probably because the Waterloo Cup was held in the area. Since the ban on hare coursing I've only seen the odd one. Sad really; watching them box in the spring was always enjoyable.

 

I don't really understand your point here, why would the presence of the Waterloo Cup lead to a large number of Hares?

 

For anyone travelling as a passenger by motorway, hares and deers are a really easy spot from the M40 and the M5.  Once you see a few, and get used to looking for them, then you'll see them all the time.

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I don't really understand your point here, why would the presence of the Waterloo Cup lead to a large number of Hares?

For anyone travelling as a passenger by motorway, hares and deers are a really easy spot from the M40 and the M5. Once you see a few, and get used to looking for them, then you'll see them all the time.

Because they were looked after and encouraged to breed and flourish by the gamekeepers. Since the demise of the Waterloo Cup the local farmers have undertaken a programme of pest control reducing their numbers dramatically.

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Because they were looked after and encouraged to breed and flourish by the gamekeepers. Since the demise of the Waterloo Cup the local farmers have undertaken a programme of pest control reducing their numbers dramatically.

 

Farmers are just ace.  So when they could gamble they weren't a pest, now that they cannot they are.  Lovely people.

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Farmers are just ace. So when they could gamble they weren't a pest, now that they cannot they are. Lovely people.

I believe they received "compensation" from the landowners (Lord Derby for example), but yes your point stands. I have seen one or two in recent months so maybe they are staging a comeback. I hope so.

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It is estimated that the hare population has declined by c80% in the last hundred years.

 

Sightings of hares can be reported to the Hare Preservation Trust :-

http://www.hare-preservation-trust.co.uk/sighting.php

 

Lamping to kill hares is still, unfortunately, far from eradicated.

 

Hares are magnificent creatures and are the subject of many myths and folk tales about their powers. 'The Leaping Hare' by George Ewart Evans is well worth a read.

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I know someone  who goes hare coursing in Scotland with half a dozen mates. The police look the other way if they see them.

Edited by Wolford6

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It is estimated that the hare population has declined by c80% in the last hundred years.

Sightings of hares can be reported to the Hare Preservation Trust :-

http://www.hare-preservation-trust.co.uk/sighting.php

Lamping to kill hares is still, unfortunately, far from eradicated.

Thanks, I had a good read and will print off a few of those and leave in the car. I'd guess the reduction in numbers is down to habitat change.

I saw one close up two weeks ago whilst cycling, one ran out of a field into the lane I was on and ran up the lane in front of me for about 40 yards until there was another gap where it went back into the field. I was doing over 20 mph, and I didn't make any ground up on it.

As for lamping, I struggle to understand the motives of people who kill for fun.

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I struggle to understand the motives of people who kill for fun.

 

Most only kill as many as they want to eat.

 

 

Most coursers do it primarily as a sport for, and with, their dogs.

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Most only kill as many as they want to eat.

 

 

Most coursers do it primarily as a sport for, and with, their dogs.

 

As I said, I struggle with motives of those who kill for fun.  Sport is supposed to be fun, for all participants.  If they want to shoot a gun, then go clay pigeon shooting.

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I once worked in an animal testing laboratory. Periodically, animals had to be killed. I've never since had any hangups over the experience.

 

 

We are all animals and we all have a degree of killer instinct. Why do so many kids volunteer for the army? Why do so many people go fishing? Why be squeamish about killing animals and then get a halal-meat curry? Why feel bad about killing rabbits but not rats or mice or slugs?

 

 

It's a conundrum that we all have to individually face.

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I once worked in an animal testing laboratory. Periodically, animals had to be killed. I've never since had any hangups over the experience.

 

 

I don't see how this is relevant.  I have little or no issues with animals being used for medical research, but I have huge issues with them being used for cosmetic products like shampoo and makeup.

 

 

We are all animals and we all have a degree of killer instinct. Why do so many kids volunteer for the army? Why do so many people go fishing? Why be squeamish about killing animals and then get a halal-meat curry? Why feel bad about killing rabbits but not rats or mice or slugs?

 

 

Kids go into the army for a number of reasons; Employment, travel, camaraderie, stupidity, adventure etc .  I don't remember seeing any recruitment posters or adverts saying "come and join up and kill people".

 

I have little or no issues with animals being killed for their meat, I just expect it to be done humanely.  

 

I don't feel bad about rabbits being killed for meat, again so long as it's done humanely.  Shock horror, I have poisoned rats in my garage and I don't feel bad about it as I don't believe that it's good to coexist in the same property as them.  

 

 

It's a conundrum that we all have to individually face.

 

It's not really a conundrum for me.  Killing animals for fun is pathetic.

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Wolford will derail the best of threads, which is a shame.

Anyhow, our garden has burst into life with birds in the last few days. We've counted over 18 species including a chiffchaff, never seen before, which presumably was en route to some foreign climate and stopped off to pick some insects off the mesh that covers my vegetables.

I have to replenish the bird bath water twice a day at the moment, it's like Ilkley Lido in high summer.

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