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voteronniegibbs

spuggies and jackdaws and hedgehogs and frogs

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Wolford will derail the best of threads, which is a shame.

 

 

 

How have I derailed it? Someone else raised the issue of hare coursing, not me.

 

Killing is all a major part of nature. Those birds you like are concentrating on keeping alive and reproducing; they are more than happy at the opportunity of killing insects and other birds. It's not all Squirrel Nutkins, no matter how much some people would like it to be.

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Anyhow, our garden has burst into life with birds in the last few days. We've counted over 18 species including a chiffchaff, never seen before, which presumably was en route to some foreign climate and stopped off to pick some insects off the mesh that covers my vegetables.

I have to replenish the bird bath water twice a day at the moment, it's like Ilkley Lido in high summer.

 

Plenty of birds are migrating at this time of year, including ones migrating into this country.

Some chiifchaffs, like some of the other warblers, over winter in this country, even in the north.

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How have I derailed it? Someone else raised the issue of hare coursing, not me.

 

Killing is all a major part of nature. Those birds you like are concentrating on keeping alive and reproducing; they are more than happy at the opportunity of killing insects and other birds. It's not all Squirrel Nutkins, no matter how much some people would like it to be.

 

I think he may have been referring to this post:

 

 

HTH :rolleyes:

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I saw one close up two weeks ago whilst cycling

Were you on your touring bike?

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Thanks, I had a good read and will print off a few of those and leave in the car. I'd guess the reduction in numbers is down to habitat change.

I saw one close up two weeks ago whilst cycling, one ran out of a field into the lane I was on and ran up the lane in front of me for about 40 yards until there was another gap where it went back into the field. I was doing over 20 mph, and I didn't make any ground up on it.

As for lamping, I struggle to understand the motives of people who kill for fun.

I see a lot of hares when I'm out cycling. They often do that running along the road thing you describe. They seem to enjoy sprinting along the tarmac.

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Were you on your touring bike?

 

 

Pathetic.

I thought it was exceptionally good considering whence it came.

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I thought it was exceptionally good considering whence it came.

Personally I don't like the obsession that some have about me being on tour, with my band.

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Since the visit by a chiffchaff we've had a pheasant, a treecreeper, a nuthatch and, to top it all, today a ring ouzel spent about 20 minutes in our back garden picking off worms.

I've never seen one before and I suppose I might never see one again. Such a shame I didn't get a photo.

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I see a lot of hares when I'm out cycling. They often do that running along the road thing you describe. They seem to enjoy sprinting along the tarmac.

I have only once seen hares boxing, which is rather funny to watch!

 

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I have only once seen hares boxing, which is rather funny to watch!

That is just brilliant.

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Since the visit by a chiffchaff we've had a pheasant, a treecreeper, a nuthatch and, to top it all, today a ring ouzel spent about 20 minutes in our back garden picking off worms.

I've never seen one before and I suppose I might never see one again. Such a shame I didn't get a photo.

 

LW what is the terrain/countryside around your house like?

 

It's unusual to get a ring ouzel in a garden, although I have heard of it happening.

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I have only once seen hares boxing, which is rather funny to watch!

 

 

It's a great spectacle, which a small proportion of our population have seen.

 

You probably know this, but the boxing is the females who are not ready to mate fighting off the males who are keen to copulate.

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It's a great spectacle, which a small proportion of our population have seen.

 

You probably know this, but the boxing is the females who are not ready to mate fighting off the males who are keen to copulate.

 

Any parallels with a night out in Golborne are incidental.

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Still classier than Jeremy Kyle...

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With the end of the hunting season round here the other week, a stag has decided to come down to the outskirts of the village and bellow in a splendidly defiant manner.  Scared the Bejaysus out of my puppy.

 

As did the he hawing of a pair of beveiled donkeys in the next field.

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It's a great spectacle, which a small proportion of our population have seen.

You probably know this, but the boxing is the females who are not ready to mate fighting off the males who are keen to copulate.

The males can be a bit rapey it would seem.

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LW what is the terrain/countryside around your house like?

 

It's unusual to get a ring ouzel in a garden, although I have heard of it happening.

I'm not a twitcher but I had a feeling that this was something very unusual.

I looked up the ring ouzel on t'internet and only then realised what I had witnessed. There is even a website for reporting sightings of this critically endangered highland bird, which I did. So what was he doing in north Leeds on a Sunday morning? Probably en route to Africa from Scotland and stopping off to refuel.

To answer your question, If you go to google maps and look up LS17 8DZ you will see exactly where we live. We are about a third of a mile from the northern edge of Leeds, where suburbia meets farmland, Eccup reservoir and the beautiful Harewood estate (red kite country).

Our garden is pretty big, with mature trees like rowan, silver birch and 100 ft beech hedge. We get a huge and diverse range of birds, but never something so unusual as this.

He was an aggressive so-and-so, attacking blackbirds on the grass and darting in and out of the trees and hedges frantically. He spent quite a while right in front of my kitchen window pulling worms up, occasionally jumping up into the rowan tree for the berries.

Only afterwards did I realise that I hadn't bothered to take a photo, which I am kicking myself for now.

Mark

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I'm not a twitcher but I had a feeling that this was something very unusual.

I looked up the ring ouzel on t'internet and only then realised what I had witnessed. There is even a website for reporting sightings of this critically endangered highland bird, which I did. So what was he doing in north Leeds on a Sunday morning? Probably en route to Africa from Scotland and stopping off to refuel.

To answer your question, If you go to google maps and look up LS17 8DZ you will see exactly where we live. We are about a third of a mile from the northern edge of Leeds, where suburbia meets farmland, Eccup reservoir and the beautiful Harewood estate (red kite country).

Our garden is pretty big, with mature trees like rowan, silver birch and 100 ft beech hedge. We get a huge and diverse range of birds, but never something so unusual as this.

He was an aggressive so-and-so, attacking blackbirds on the grass and darting in and out of the trees and hedges frantically. He spent quite a while right in front of my kitchen window pulling worms up, occasionally jumping up into the rowan tree for the berries.

Only afterwards did I realise that I hadn't bothered to take a photo, which I am kicking myself for now.

Mark

 

Living where you do, you are not far from areas where ring ouzels breed etc. They are a member of the thrush family and they are usually a bit smaller than blackbirds There are still numerous sightings of them in the uplands of the north of England, even though their numbers have declined significantly. They are shy birds usually and can be very difficult to spot when in their breeding areas. They tend to head towards the coast before their autumn migration south.

 

Another possibility, given your observations of the aggressive behaviour, is that you have seen a bird with leucisism in your garden, that is one that shows some white features where there would more normally be black/brown colouration. At this time of year birds from N Europe/Scandinavia migrate to this country to spend the autumn and winter here and they fly into the territories of established birds, with predictable conflict ensuing; this will include a number of birds with markings which are not conventional.

 

I hope the above is not too boring.

 

Anyway, let us know if said bird is around in the next few days.

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Anyway, let us know if said bird is around in the next few days.

 

He's back this morning, darting in and out of the rowan tree to munch on the berries.

 

I got a really good view through my binoculars and he's definitely not leucistic, it's a textbook ring ouzel.

 

If only he'd stand still for a photo!

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Not a single berry on my rowan bush this year.

 

I'm chopping my apple bushes down to the stumps ... over the last few years, they've got decimated by a progressive knobbly mange.

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Living where you do, you are not far from areas where ring ouzels breed etc. They are a member of the thrush family and they are usually a bit smaller than blackbirds There are still numerous sightings of them in the uplands of the north of England, even though their numbers have declined significantly. They are shy birds usually and can be very difficult to spot when in their breeding areas. They tend to head towards the coast before their autumn migration south.

 

Another possibility, given your observations of the aggressive behaviour, is that you have seen a bird with leucisism in your garden, that is one that shows some white features where there would more normally be black/brown colouration. At this time of year birds from N Europe/Scandinavia migrate to this country to spend the autumn and winter here and they fly into the territories of established birds, with predictable conflict ensuing; this will include a number of birds with markings which are not conventional.

 

I hope the above is not too boring.

 

Anyway, let us know if said bird is around in the next few days.

I had a "blackbird" with a big white patch on its head in my garden last year.

Does that mean it was a Ring Ouzel?

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I had a "blackbird" with a big white patch on its head in my garden last year.

Does that mean it was a Ring Ouzel?

Nah, you often see blackbirds with white patches. It's known as leucism (as longboard refers to above).

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The squirrels in my garden are making some noise. I thought it was a Maggie, was shocked to see it was the squirrel

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