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voteronniegibbs

spuggies and jackdaws and hedgehogs and frogs

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He's back this morning, darting in and out of the rowan tree to munch on the berries.

 

I got a really good view through my binoculars and he's definitely not leucistic, it's a textbook ring ouzel.

 

If only he'd stand still for a photo!

 

Interesting.

Good luck with the photography.

 

http://www.ringouzel.info/news_howtoidentify.html

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Saw a massive stag on the road between Banbury and Warwick about 20:00 this evening.

Had to slam the brakes on to avoid killing it, and probably us; he was massive.

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People are regularly killed or badly injured round here by stags, deer and boar running into the road.  Big beasts they are.

 

Today, my puppy used up another life by discovering and having a good sniff at a viper which was out on the path catching some rays.

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People are regularly killed or badly injured round here by stags, deer and boar running into the road.  Big beasts they are.

 

Today, my puppy used up another life by discovering and having a good sniff at a viper which was out on the path catching some rays.

A friend of ours, many years ago, had a bit of bad luck with North York Moors wildlife.

 

1. Firstly, his car was hit by a deer. Made quite a mess.

2. He got it back after repairs and, within a week, it was stolen.

3. Within a month of it being recovered, he was driving along the road towards our house, and was hit by TWO deer simultaneously. Caved in the entire front of the vehicle.

 

He would have sold it to get rid of the bad luck, but when two fully grown deer hit an Austin Metro, you may as well just give up on the thing.

 

As for the deer, everyone in the area knows which pub to call. They'll send out a bloke who'll dispose of the bodies and you'll get a fine venison dish next time you visit.

Edited by Futtocks

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A friend of ours, many years ago, had a bit of bad luck with North York Moors wildlife.

 

1. Firstly, his car was hit by a deer. Made quite a mess.

2. He got it back after repairs and, within a week, it was stolen.

3. Within a month of it being recovered, he was driving along the road towards our house, and was hit by TWO deer simultaneously. Caved in the entire front of the vehicle.

 

He would have sold it to get rid of the bad luck, but when two fully grown deer hit an Austin Metro, you may as well just give up on the thing.

 

As for the deer, everyone in the area knows which pub to call. They'll send out a bloke who'll dispose of the bodies and you'll get a fine venison dish next time you visit.

 

Perhaps a bit of hindsight would have helped your friend.  :ph34r:

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Perhaps a bit of hindsight would have helped your friend.  :ph34r:

 

You should get ten to fifteen years for that.

 

Also, who the hell in their right mind bought an Austin Metro?

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You should get ten to fifteen years for that.

 

Also, who the hell in their right mind bought an Austin Metro?

 

Doe!

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You should get ten to fifteen years for that.

 

Also, who the hell in their right mind bought an Austin Metro?

Are you kidding?

You could pick up a metro for next to nowt.

Spares were free, just ask you mate down the pub to "borrow" a bit from BL.

The "A" series engine could run on an oily rag, lift the lid, change the points and plugs that was it. If necessary you could do a complete engine inc gearbox change in 3 hours.

cheapest motoring I've ever had.

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Are you kidding?

You could pick up a metro for next to nowt.

Spares were free, just ask you mate down the pub to "borrow" a bit from BL.

The "A" series engine could run on an oily rag, lift the lid, change the points and plugs that was it. If necessary you could do a complete engine inc gearbox change in 3 hours.

cheapest motoring I've ever had.

Living out in the country as we were then, Metros and Fiestas were popular, for their simplicity and cheapness. You'd usually see a well-used Fiesta parked up at a farm for general road use, alongside a 4x4 for farm work. Simple cars, so if you had a bit of mechanical experience, you could fix most things on them without going miles and miles to a garage with repair facilities.

Edited by Futtocks

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My Mam's Metro had a strange existence. She "knew the roads" within about ten miles either side of our village. If she was on her own, once she got to Abergavenny or Newport, she parked it and caught a bus.

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Are you kidding?

You could pick up a metro for next to nowt.

Spares were free, just ask you mate down the pub to "borrow" a bit from BL.

The "A" series engine could run on an oily rag, lift the lid, change the points and plugs that was it. If necessary you could do a complete engine inc gearbox change in 3 hours.

cheapest motoring I've ever had.

 

Figure 1.  Bearman in a Metro.

 

Mk64dkmodel.png

 

Futtocks, I get that about the Fiesta.  The Metro was a dog.

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The Metro was launched with a level of publicity few other cars have had in this country. They sold a load right from the start. I never was a fan, but I wouldn't say no to a 6R4!

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The Metro was launched with a level of publicity few other cars have had in this country. They sold a load right from the start. I never was a fan, but I wouldn't say no to a 6R4!

 

I agree, but the 6R4 had about in common as Idi Amin and my mate Dave from next door.  I'd bet big that there are more of the Metro's predecessor on the road today than the Metro.

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Don't know what food source these swans had discovered but it  must have been good. They were really getting bounced about by the swell on the Humber.

 

SAM_0791_zps3690c8d7.jpg

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Anyone else experiencing "overwintering" ladybirds?

I seem to be finding them all over the house, especially around the windows.

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Anyone else experiencing "overwintering" ladybirds?

I seem to be finding them all over the house, especially around the windows.

Not something I'd ever noticed till we moved house about three years ago but where we are now we get loads of them spending the winter indoors.

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There was a sparrowhawk sat on the new fence at our house Christmas Day morning.

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Not something I'd ever noticed till we moved house about three years ago but where we are now we get loads of them spending the winter indoors.

yes we have had a couple appear thing is they are the wrong kind they are the of the bad ladybird type.

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was really happy to see a pair of Song Thrushes in the garden the other morning,it's been a long while

we've got a pair of Dunnocks in the conifers at the bottom and there's a Robin that has taken a shine to the food we put out,the friendly Blackbird has brought a pal with him,and the Starlings are here half a dozen at a time,2 or 3 Jackdaws have been on the garage roof along with the Collared Doves that are nesting nearby,there's a 3rd Wood Pigeon that's arrived which turns up occasionally with the other 2,I thought they might have seen him off.

The friendly Blackbird came down onto the fence whilst I was putting some fruit out and actually caught my ear with his wing,he sat on 1 edge of the feed tray as I had my hand on the other side a matter of inches away

there's something very relaxing about seeing a good crowd of them in the garden at the same time smile.gif

Leave the rest but shoot the robin.

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we have a blackbird that spends all its time removing the berries from a bush in our back garden at this time of year, it eats so many it can hardly fly.

we have nuts and seeds in the front garden that have been totally ignored all winter, must be plenty other food out there.

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yes we have had a couple appear thing is they are the wrong kind they are the of the bad ladybird type.

 

Harlequin ladybirds?

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Harlequin ladybirds?

Don't make this cross code. The jailer will be along to move or lock it.

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we have a blackbird that spends all its time removing the berries from a bush in our back garden at this time of year, it eats so many it can hardly fly.

we have nuts and seeds in the front garden that have been totally ignored all winter, must be plenty other food out there.

 

There have been a lot of berries on the trees and bushes this year and mild weather tends to mean that feeders etc are not visited as much. During the recent cold snap the number of birds using my feeders went up markedly, as the birds have to eat plenty to keep their body temperature up.

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