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hindle xiii

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Tripe and onions Last night, faggots and peas with onion gravy tonight.

All from my daughters local butcher in Ibstock Leicetersbhire. It's also the butchers that Hollywood star Stephen Graham uses.

Edited by Bearman

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Cassoulet recently.Good old french recipe keith floyd did. GOOD SAUSAGE CHICKEN THIGHS SMOKED HAM CARROTS TOMATOES CELERY STOCK CHILLI whatever .Great one pot meal. Oh dont forget the crunchy bread for the lovely juices/

Oh forgot the chick peas and the butter beans and cannelini beans.From a tin of course.

Edited by tomdooley

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Chick peas? Chicken? Tomatoes? Keith must have been seriously hammered when he wrote this.

 

Here's a reasonably authentic recipe: http://www.travelchannel.com/shows/anthony-bourdain/articles/cassoulet

 

It says three days, but if you buy pre-soaked white beans (i.e. canned), that's a day cut out already. You can also buy tins of confit duck legs - another day less, so now we are down to a normal recipe timescale.

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Cassoulet recently.Good old french recipe keith floyd did. GOOD SAUSAGE CHICKEN THIGHS SMOKED HAM CARROTS TOMATOES CELERY STOCK CHILLI whatever .Great one pot meal. Oh dont forget the crunchy bread for the lovely juices/

Oh forgot the chick peas.

 

That's NOT a cassoulet.

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Last night I went for a pave steak (can't work out how to do accents), served a point, with chips and petit pois.

 

I also made a rather lovely red wine, onion and smoked lardons gravy to go with it.

 

Same again tonight!

Pavé, à point.  Middle row of my keyboard goes .... asdfghjkléà$

 

Homemade curry for me last night.  Chicken, chick pea and spinach.  Served with chapatis and chilli pickle.   Superb.   

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Got some big beef short ribs for tomorrow - I will be applying a spice rub tonight and letting it marinate.

Edited by Futtocks

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Chick peas? Chicken? Tomatoes? Keith must have been seriously hammered when he wrote this.

 

Here's a reasonably authentic recipe: http://www.travelchannel.com/shows/anthony-bourdain/articles/cassoulet

 

It says three days, but if you buy pre-soaked white beans (i.e. canned), that's a day cut out already. You can also buy tins of confit duck legs - another day less, so now we are down to a normal recipe timescale.

Sorry my cook tells me it is from the hairy bikers book!!

Here is floyds recipe

1kg  belly pork

6 pieces preserved goose or duck

750gms dried white haricot beans  {soaked in water overnight}

10 cloves garlic

1 bayleaf,thyme,and 1pinch powdered cloves

4 tomatoes peeled deseeded and chopped

1 tablespoon tomatoe puree

4 lightly cured top quality pork sausages

750gms toulouse or similar smoked sausage

This is from Floyd on France!!

Are all you chefs out there happy with this?

 

The hairy bikers is very good .Try it.

Edited by tomdooley

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Sorry my cook tells me it is from the hairy bikers book!!

It is from their diet book - essentially a bowdlerised 'lite' chicken stew.

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It is from their diet book - essentially a bowdlerised 'lite' chicken stew.

have you ever eaten it?Try it then tell me its not tasty .Are you being a food snob?

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have you ever eaten it?Try it then tell me its not tasty .Are you being a food snob?

 

I think Futtocks knows his food. I find my stomach rumbling at the mere thought of some of his meal descriptions. If he ever starts an open kitchen with the folk from TRL invited for dinner I am straight on the train.

 

There's being a food snob and there's being someone who knows a lot about authentic good quality food. 

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have you ever eaten it?Try it then tell me its not tasty .Are you being a food snob?

I'm not saying it's bad - in fact it looks very tasty, and in my experience the Bikers are a good source of recipes.

 

But it just isn't a Cassoulet.

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I have just listed the recipe from keith Floyd s book circa 1987. Is this a cassoulet recipe?

He says it is.

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I have just listed the recipe from keith Floyd s book circa 1987. Is this a cassoulet recipe?

He says it is.

The Floyd one looks like Cassoulet to me. The cloves, tomatoes, tomato puree and smoked sausage may be a regional variation, but the overall ingredients are what you'd expect.

 

It is a pretty fatty dish, and not something you ought to have too often, but done right, it is delicious.

 

Edit: the Hairy Bikers do take a fair few liberties with traditional recipes. This doesn't mean it will be bad, just different (sometimes a lot different) from the original. 

Edited by Futtocks

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To be fair, cassoulet round these parts of S France is a bit of a hotch potch of whatever you want to throw into it.

 

Another one of the "classic" dishes that originate from the "whatever you have left in the larder" school of cooking.

 

I've seen and eaten cassoulets with chicken, duck, pork, lamb, beef?!, and all have had the beans thing in common but not much else. 

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To be fair, cassoulet round these parts of S France is a bit of a hotch potch of whatever you want to throw into it.

 

Another one of the "classic" dishes that originate from the "whatever you have left in the larder" school of cooking.

 

I've seen and eaten cassoulets with chicken, duck, pork, lamb, beef?!, and all have had the beans thing in common but not much else. 

Exactly cassoulet i think means stewpot.

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I bought 6 oysters from Tesco tonight for a £1.

I'm hoping they all work!

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The last ones I bought from tesco worked a treat. Couldn't get off t'lav for 3 days!

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My new oven seems to hold its temperature pretty well, although the dial isn't all that accurate. So I bought an oven thermometer to get a more accurate reading on what it is actually doing.

 

The markings on the dial start at 75 degrees (Centigrade), but there's about quarter of the dial unmarked below that. The thermometer helped at this point.

 

Sooooo... I did a sous-vide tonight, in a big casserole pan of water which I left in the oven to achieve 55 degrees centigrade. Part-smoked salmon fillets, in a zip-lock bag with butter, tarragon and chives. Cooked for about 50 minutes and served with mashed potatoes and steamed runner beans. A complete success!

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My new oven seems to hold its temperature pretty well, although the dial isn't all that accurate. So I bought an oven thermometer to get a more accurate reading on what it is actually doing.

 

The markings on the dial start at 75 degrees (Centigrade), but there's about quarter of the dial unmarked below that. The thermometer helped at this point.

 

Sooooo... I did a sous-vide tonight, in a big casserole pan of water which I left in the oven to achieve 55 degrees centigrade. Part-smoked salmon fillets, in a zip-lock bag with butter, tarragon and chives. Cooked for about 50 minutes and served with mashed potatoes and steamed runner beans. A complete success!

 

I find sous-vide salmon texturally and visually odd and frankly unappealing.

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I find sous-vide salmon texturally and visually odd and frankly unappealing.

Not for everyone, perhaps. But it is very tender and the flavour of the salmon and everything you put in the bag with it is unadulterated..

 

You could, of course, finish the salmon in a hot frying pan, to give it a more traditional look on the outside.

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I bought 6 oysters from Tesco tonight for a £1.

I'm hoping they all work!

The first oyster I ever had was on the seafront at Scarborough. Wonderfully fresh!

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My new oven seems to hold its temperature pretty well, although the dial isn't all that accurate. So I bought an oven thermometer to get a more accurate reading on what it is actually doing.

 

The markings on the dial start at 75 degrees (Centigrade), but there's about quarter of the dial unmarked below that. The thermometer helped at this point.

 

Sooooo... I did a sous-vide tonight, in a big casserole pan of water which I left in the oven to achieve 55 degrees centigrade. Part-smoked salmon fillets, in a zip-lock bag with butter, tarragon and chives. Cooked for about 50 minutes and served with mashed potatoes and steamed runner beans. A complete success!

Okay, sous-vide again tonight; this time, a sirloin steak. I will finish it in a hot frying pan with oil and butter, to get a good crust on the outside.

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is the sous vide just an 'experiment' or do you prefer the taste when it's cooked that way?

 

Regarding pigeon etc, i couldn't think of anything better than roasting it on the bone.

 

 

Good couple of teas recently.

 

Pho last night with sirloin. Not a fan of a rice noodle though, might experiment with an egg noodle.

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is the sous vide just an 'experiment' or do you prefer the taste when it's cooked that way?

 

Regarding pigeon etc, i couldn't think of anything better than roasting it on the bone.

 

 

Good couple of teas recently.

 

Pho last night with sirloin. Not a fan of a rice noodle though, might experiment with an egg noodle.

Pigeon is one of my favourite meats (when I can get it), but game is prone to drying out and becoming tough if you're not careful when roasting.

 

I will try the sous-vide method next time I get some pigeon, as it means there is zero moisture loss and could be good for game in general. I was tempted by a venison steak at Sainsbury's today, but decided to have a go at it later.

 

Meat cooked this way can be pink/red in the middle, juicy and tasty but still tender to eat and hot all the way through. 

 

I have a slow cooker, which has been a great way to enjoy more cuts of more meats, and sous-vide is in some ways a progression from that. Fergus Henderson's combination of guinea fowl (or small chicken) with leeks works really well in the slow cooker.

 

I'm with you on the noodle thing - rice noodles are a bit 'meh' and need a thick sauce to coat them and add flavour. Egg noodles might work better with pho, although I haven't tried it. What about Udon noodles? A fusion too far perhaps?

Edited by Futtocks

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After 9 curries in 10 nights, for my latest farewell to the UK I am making my wife a fillet steak, red wine and onion gravy, potato dauphinoise and broccoli tea tonight.

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