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hindle xiii

Food and drink thread

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Bombay, makers of the well-known Sapphire gin, have introduced a London Dry gin. Available at Sainsbury's (my local branch at least) at £17 for a litre. It's pretty nice. The price is just an extra incentive.

 

I recently purchased a bottle of Tesco Finest London Dry Gin and was really taken by it. It's a very reasonable price and was very easy drinking. Some of the own brand stuff is really quite good.

 

Hendricks Gin is another I tried quite recently and enjoyed.

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I recently purchased a bottle of Tesco Finest London Dry Gin and was really taken by it. It's a very reasonable price and was very easy drinking. Some of the own brand stuff is really quite good.

 

Hendricks Gin is another I tried quite recently and enjoyed.

Hendricks is very nice.

 

And 'own brand' is worth trying out, because if you find one you like, that's a significant saving. I prefer Sainsbury's own brand tonic water to the ubiquitous Schweppes, and it's about half the price too.

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I pushed the boat out a bit today, and bought a hare. After the butcher had jointed it, there's enough for 3-4 single meals.

 

I am currently marinating the saddle, which will be stuffed with black garlic and thyme, then roasted.

Hare part 2 tonight: casseroling the legs in the slow cooker. Serving up with mashed potatoes and sautéed morels, same as last night.

 

Last night's saddle was just a little underdone, so I carved out the loin and gave it a little extra finishing in the frying pan. Ended up tasting very nice, but could/should have been better from the start. The morels and the black garlic were delicious.

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Currently converting (and reducing) this recipe from US to UK measurements: Slow Cooker Korean Beef. The only unusual ingredient is Sriracha, which I think I can get at Wing Yip, but is just a chilli sauce, which can be substituted for another type if I can't.

 

http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking/

Edited by Futtocks

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Currently converting (and reducing) this recipe from US to UK measurements: Slow Cooker Korean Beef. The only unusual ingredient is Sriracha, which I think I can get at Wing Yip, but is just a chilli sauce, which can be substituted for another type if I can't.

 

http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking/

Got all the ingredients for this except the onion powder (I'll substitute diced onion or shallot) and white pepper (I'll use black). Cooking it all up tomorrow. Report/autopsy to follow.

 

I'd forgotten Marks & Spencer sold Sriracha sauce, which is usually shelved with the oriental ready-meals. In addition, mixed with mayonnaise, it makes a good seafood or burger sauce. Makes a damn good prawn mayo sandwich.

 

While at M&S, I also bought a Georgian white wine and a Brazilian red, just because they were there and I hadn't tried them before. Pretty good, too.

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Futtocks, can you tell me where the butcher is you are getting Hare from? Ta.

It was from one of the butchers stalls at Borough Market. Looking at the online map, I'm pretty certain it is Furness Fish & Game. I get pigeon (whole or breast) from them most times I visit the market.

Edited by Futtocks

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It was from one of the butchers stalls at Borough Market. Looking at the online map, I'm pretty certain it is Furness Fish & Game. I get pigeon (whole or breast) from them most times I visit the market.

BTW, they only sell them complete, although they'll joint them for you. Otherwise I'd just go for legs, if your local butcher offers the option.

 

The Korean Beef recipe I linked to earlier is cooking, and already smells good! Here it is in non-American measurements and the quantities halved. Should serve 4.

 

INGREDIENTS

120 ml beef stock

60 ml soy sauce

50 g brown sugar

2 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 tablespoon sesame oil

1/2 tablespoon rice wine vinegar

1/2 tablespoons freshly grated ginger

1/2 teaspoon Sriracha (chilli sauce), or more, to taste

1/4 teaspoon onion powder (I used half a shallot, sliced fine)

1/4 teaspoon white pepper (I used black pepper in this case)

1.5 lb beef stewing steak, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 tablespoon cornflour

1/2 teaspoon sesame seeds

1 spring onion, thinly sliced

 

Option: add broccoli or sugar snap peas to the slow cooker 10 minutes before serving, or cook them separately (see note at end).

 

INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a large bowl, whisk together beef stock, soy sauce, brown sugar, garlic, sesame oil, rice wine vinegar, ginger, Sriracha, onion powder and white pepper.

 

2. Place beef into a slow cooker. Stir in beef broth mixture until well combined.

 

3. Cover and cook on low heat for 7-8 hours or high heat for 3-4 hours.

 

4. In a small bowl, whisk together cornflour and 1/4 cup cold water 'til smooth. Stir in mixture into the slow cooker. Cover and cook on high heat for an additional 30 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened.

 

5. Serve immediately, garnished with green onions and sesame seeds.

 

Note: if you make more than one meal's worth, then garnish the dish after serving and cook the greens separately. Then allow the unused beef to cool, stick in the fridge overnight and reheat. It should taste even better on the second day.

Edited by Futtocks

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Just about to start making that Korean Beef recipe again. :) 

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It looks like an imitation bulgogi?

It has some ingredients in common with a bulgogi, but the cooking method and the result is very different.

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It has some ingredients in common with a bulgogi, but the cooking method and the result is very different.

 

A good (easy) bulgogi recipe would be very nice indeed.

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A good (easy) bulgogi recipe would be very nice indeed.

I got this from a friend, who says it's pretty good easy version.

 

Beef Bulgogi

SERVES 4-6

 

Ingredients

2 lbs sirloin

 

Marinade

60 ml soy sauce

3 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1 teaspoon sesame oil

1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

3 medium garlic cloves (crushed)

3 spring onions (chopped, including green part)

 

Sauce for serving

6 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1 teaspoon fresh ginger (grated)

2 teaspoons crushed toasted sesame seeds

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/4 teaspoon sweet paprika

1 pinch sugar

 

Directions

1. Mix ingredients (except meat) and set aside.

2. Slice sirloin paper thin against the grain of the meat (if you freeze it and let it only partially thaw before slicing, you can get the meat thinner).

3. Marinade sirloin for 30 minutes.

4. Mix ingredients for dipping sauce and refrigerate until ready for use.

5. Grill or pan fry the beef.

6. Serve over rice with dipping sauce.

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It was too hot/humid to cook today, so I made Bhel Puri instead.

 

Well, almost. I forgot the potatoes until it was a bit too late, so omitted them. The spiced puffed rice, sev (dry noodles), groundnuts, raw onions, tamarind sauce and coriander/chilli paste were all present. Delicious! Just enough chilli heat to balance the sweetness.

 

I also included some creamed coconut in the coriander sauce, just to see if it worked. It did, and will be used next time I make this dish.

 

The rice/sev/nuts mix can be found at many supermarkets, and is nice enough as a dry snack. After looking around unsuccessfully for a bit, I found the tamarind sauce at Waitrose, as part of Anjum Anand's Spice Tailor range. The green sauce was made by putting coriander (leaves and stalks), a green chilli, a bit of creamed coconut and a squeeze of lemon juice into a blender and whizzing it for a few seconds.

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It was too hot/humid to cook today, so I made Bhel Puri instead.

 

Well, almost. I forgot the potatoes until it was a bit too late, so omitted them. The spiced puffed rice, sev (dry noodles), groundnuts, raw onions, tamarind sauce and coriander/chilli paste were all present. Delicious! Just enough chilli heat to balance the sweetness.

 

I also included some creamed coconut in the coriander sauce, just to see if it worked. It did, and will be used next time I make this dish.

 

The rice/sev/nuts mix can be found at many supermarkets, and is nice enough as a dry snack. After looking around unsuccessfully for a bit, I found the tamarind sauce at Waitrose, as part of Anjum Anand's Spice Tailor range. The green sauce was made by putting coriander (leaves and stalks), a green chilli, a bit of creamed coconut and a squeeze of lemon juice into a blender and whizzing it for a few seconds.

Bhel Puri again tonight, only this time I remembered to get the potatoes done (new potatoes, boiled/steamed and chopped into half-inch cubes, or near enough). So damn good, and once you've done the spuds, there's no other cooking needed.

 

141.jpg

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Just bought a copy of this for 1p (plus P&P), to replace the one I lost to water damage a few years ago. Chapters go by regions and list traditional British recipes, from the simple to the unusual. It also contains more general information about food/drink producers and traditions.

 

If you have pride in or curiosity about our food heritage, this is quite a collection of knowledge. Everything from Oxford John to Cullen Skink to Rum Nicky.

 

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Edited by Futtocks

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Cheeses of Nazareth!

 

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Cheeses of Nazareth!

 

CKWKHPuWEAAzDbZ.jpg

Praise be to Cheesus....

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Just polished off some sous-vide lamb neck (cooked with rosemary, honey and garlic), with mashed potatoes and marrowfat peas. Fantastic. :) 

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Just polished off some sous-vide lamb neck (cooked with rosemary, honey and garlic), with mashed potatoes and marrowfat peas. Fantastic. :)

 

Sounds fantastic, I do love slow cooked lamb. Do you have your own sous-vide machine or do you improvise? 

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Sounds fantastic, I do love slow cooked lamb. Do you have your own sous-vide machine or do you improvise? 

Sous-vide machines (the good ones, at least) are expensive and take up kitchen space. What I do is ersatz sous-vide, but the results are still good.

 

So what you need is:

1. A digital thermometer with the probe on the end of a wire, so you can monitor temperature without opening the oven repeatedly. This is the one I have. It comes with a clip, so you can mount it on the side of the cooking pot, with its tip in the water. This is a very useful piece of kit for other types of cooking too. You can set it to sound an alarm when the temperature reaches a certain level, and you can use it to check the accuracy of your oven's temperature dial (most domestic cookers are fairly inaccurate).

 

2. A big cooking pot. The more water it will hold, the slower it will vary in temperature. This also applies to beer cooler sous-vide.

 

3. Zip-lock freezer bags. Due to the low temperatures involved, there's no danger of them melting.

 

4. A straw. Once the meat's in the bag with the herbs etc., close the ziplock 'til there's only a small opening. Stick the straw in and suck out the air 'til the bag snugs up tight around the meat. Then quickly remove the straw and seal the bag. Not a perfect vacuum, but close enough for the purpose. 

 

5. Hot water. My kitchen hot tap gives me water at 55 degrees C, which is close to the kind of temperatures you normally use for sous-vide. Using hot tap water means you don't have to waste oven time and power by bringing cold water up to temperature.

 

After the meat's been cooking for a few hours, you can then sear it in a hot pan with an oil/butter mix, so add colour and flavour to the outside.

Edited by Futtocks

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