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hindle xiii

Food and drink thread

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BTW, I have used the beer cooler method with salmon steaks, and the results were excellent.

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Useful thing to have - Shawarma spice. Good with chicken, as well as lamb koftas. Buy an airtight container, premix and store.

 

INGREDIENTS

1 tbsp. cumin
1 tbsp. ground coriander
1 tbsp. garlic powder
1/2 tbsp. paprika
1 tsp. turmeric
1/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/2 tsp. ground cayenne pepper
1 tsp. ground black pepper
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon

 

 

You can mix it with plain yoghurt as a marinade for chicken, or fry it for a few seconds in oil before adding to a lamb kebab mix.

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Pork Ribs (my recipe is a work in progress).
1. Jab vigorously all over with a skewer, then put in the fridge overnight under a shawarma mix dry rub.
2. Cook for three or more hours in the slow cooker/crockpot until tender.
3. Spread with glaze and finish in a regular hot oven 'til sticky.

 

Of course, not as good as proper barbecued ribs over smoke, but if you don't have a BBQ (or a garden) it'll make very tender, sticky, tasty ribs. You will also need soap and water to get the mess off your face.

 

Shawarma mix ingredients (multiply as appropriate) - see previous post.

 

Glaze ingredients. Again, scale up as necessary. Re-glaze halfway through cooking.
2 tbsp Tomato Ketchup
1 tbsp Worcester Sauce
2 tbsp Maple syrup (for a change, try black treacle or go 50/50)
1 tsp chipotle Tabasco

Edited by Futtocks

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I was in Kelso yesterday, and I found a new specialist bottled beer shop, selling an interesting variety of stock, including several local breweries' beers. The chap running it is pleasant and ready to chat and recommend.

Belhaven Oatmeal Stout: very nice indeed.
Tempest 'Unforgiven': a red rye ale, with a very smoky aftertaste. Delicious and different!
Mills & Hills Imperial Stout: not tried yet.

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I ate here tonight, just 5 minutes' walk North of King's Cross station. Really nice place, friendly staff and the food was excellent. Good beer, too.

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Apologies for the smug self-indulgence, but my spicy lamb wraps are the best thing I have created for some time and should be shared.

 

I smear baharat spice (from waitrose spice shelf) all over a couple of boneless lamb necks, then sprinkle with chilli flakes. Leave in the oven on a low heat for 3-4 hours or so.

 

Near the end, toast some pine nuts in a dry frying pan, chop up a salad of your choice (I use cucumber, red onion, tomato and red pepper) then add chopped cabbage soaked in lemon juice and chopped pickled chillis. 

 

Chuck the lot on warm wraps with a spread of tahini and I absolutely guarantee you will make it again and again.  It's utterly, dribblingly mouthwatering with the tenderness of the lamb and the crunch of the salad.

 

The trick is remembering that you need 3 hours for the lamb, so it's not a quick midweek meal.

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Apologies for the smug self-indulgence, but my spicy lamb wraps are the best thing I have created for some time and should be shared.

 

I smear baharat spice (from waitrose spice shelf) all over a couple of boneless lamb necks, then sprinkle with chilli flakes. Leave in the oven on a low heat for 3-4 hours or so.

 

Near the end, toast some pine nuts in a dry frying pan, chop up a salad of your choice (I use cucumber, red onion, tomato and red pepper) then add chopped cabbage soaked in lemon juice and chopped pickled chillis. 

 

Chuck the lot on warm wraps with a spread of tahini and I absolutely guarantee you will make it again and again.  It's utterly, dribblingly mouthwatering with the tenderness of the lamb and the crunch of the salad.

 

The trick is remembering that you need 3 hours for the lamb, so it's not a quick midweek meal.

Lamb benefits from a slow cook (Kleftico, for instance) and that recipe sounds good.

 

Do you sear the meat before putting in the oven?

Edited by Futtocks

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No I don't, although I'm not aware if I should!  The lamb necks are usualy a bit fatty so the flavours should infuse anyway, I think.... :)

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And now, a recipe for the Laydeez...

 

 

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No I don't, although I'm not aware if I should!  The lamb necks are usualy a bit fatty so the flavours should infuse anyway, I think.... :)

The caramelisation from a quick really hot sear could add to the flavour of the finished dish. It is sometimes called 'sealing' the meat, but it doesn't really.

 

You can seal meat properly by velveting it, but it's a faff and only suitable for certain dishes, mainly Chinese.

Edited by Futtocks

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Apologies for the smug self-indulgence, but my spicy lamb wraps are the best thing I have created for some time and should be shared.

 

I smear baharat spice (from waitrose spice shelf) all over a couple of boneless lamb necks, then sprinkle with chilli flakes. Leave in the oven on a low heat for 3-4 hours or so.

 

Near the end, toast some pine nuts in a dry frying pan, chop up a salad of your choice (I use cucumber, red onion, tomato and red pepper) then add chopped cabbage soaked in lemon juice and chopped pickled chillis. 

 

Chuck the lot on warm wraps with a spread of tahini and I absolutely guarantee you will make it again and again.  It's utterly, dribblingly mouthwatering with the tenderness of the lamb and the crunch of the salad.

 

The trick is remembering that you need 3 hours for the lamb, so it's not a quick midweek meal.

Okay, I've decided to do something similar. No Baharat mix in the shop, but I can assemble that from ingredients I have at home (quantities below are a bit big, but can be divided down):

4 tablespoons ground black pepper
2 tablespoons ground coriander
2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
2 tablespoons ground cloves
3 tablespoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
4 teaspoons ground nutmeg
4 tablespoons paprika
 
And instead of tahini, I'll try smoked hummus instead and see how it goes.
Edited by Futtocks

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Its cobnut season and Waitrose had a big basket of them. Looking forward to snacking on these. :)

 

IMAG0001_zpsmtnbgqvv.jpg

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Popped out to the boozer last night and had my first Oktoberfest beers of the season, courtesy of Hacker-Pschorr, Löwenbräu and Hofbräu.

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Okay, I've decided to do something similar. No Baharat mix in the shop, but I can assemble that from ingredients I have at home (quantities below are a bit big, but can be divided down):

4 tablespoons ground black pepper
2 tablespoons ground coriander
2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
2 tablespoons ground cloves
3 tablespoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
4 teaspoons ground nutmeg
4 tablespoons paprika
 
And instead of tahini, I'll try smoked hummus instead and see how it goes.

 

Okay, the lamb was really nice, but unfortunately the flatbreads I bought were a bit fragile and fell to pieces around the meat. Messy, but still tasty.

 

BTW, I got the smoked hummus from Waitrose - and it is great!

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Popped out to the boozer last night and had my first Oktoberfest beers of the season, courtesy of Hacker-Pschorr, Löwenbräu and Hofbräu.

Any proper beer? Or all just something flavourless and cold.

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Any proper beer? Or all just something flavourless and cold.

Yeah, what do the Germans know about beer?

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Yeah, what do the Germans know about beer?

:biggrin:

 

They wouldn't clean their windows with the ###### most breweries produce in this country.

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Just made Bhel Puri, but the green chilli I put in the coriander sauce was, er, just a tad hotter than I expected. Whooh!  :O

 

Still delicious.

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From the food market at St Pancras station, a wedge of Irish Gubbeen cheese and some Cornish cider & seaweed salami. Very nice!

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I made this simple recipe today, and it was damn tasty!

 

The only modification was that I bought a pot of pre-made egg fried rice from the supermarket and added almonds to that. And I didn't use watercress.

 

Oh, and when it talks about sitting a single prawn on top, that is definitely a misprint. Loads of prawns per serving, mixed with the rice, then one to garnish.

 

And a little chopped parsley to sprinkle, maybe.

Edited by Futtocks

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Pigeon, mushroom and chestnut pie tonight. Proper Winter eating! B) 

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I cooked a couple of beef back ribs in the slow cooker, with shallots, tomato, garlic, some generic bouquet garni, a splash of red wine and about a tablespoon of Cumberland sauce (the latter because the jar was there, rather than being part of any particular recipe). The smells were good, the taste even better!

 

Served with sweet potato chips and marrowfat peas.

 

£2.66 for two ribs is not to be sniffed at either.

Edited by Futtocks

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Slow roast silverside of beef tonight. Cheapest beef joint in the supermarket.

 

I seasoned it with salt & pepper, then slowly brought the internal temperature up to about 50-55 degrees centigrade (oven set to about 90-100 degrees) and held it there for an hour or two. The cooking time was about 4 hours in total. This was all a bit seat-of-the-pants, as I don't have specialist equipment and my electric oven cycles off and on, but close is pretty much good enough, as long as you have a thermometer that keeps you aware of what's going on in there (most ovens' dials are a bit inaccurate).

 

A joint of meat cooked this way releases virtually no juices, so if you want gravy, you'll have to make it from other sources/sauces (see what I did there?). A fair amount of juice comes out when you carve it, though. Deep red inside, but tender.

 

I also took a couple of peeled whole shallots, oiled them and put them in the roasting pan underneath the joint (which was on a rack), to catch what little juice was released. After the full cooking time, they kept their structure but were very tasty. Next time, I think I'll cut them in half and see how they come out.

 

Then, I seared the meat in a hot pan with salted butter and a couple of thyme sprigs. It was served up with the shallots, mashed potatoes and peas.

 

On the side, horseradish. In the mouth, delish!

 

And, of course, I bought enough meat for coldcuts in sandwiches tomorrow! 

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