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Food and drink thread

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3 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

I like eel - just not jellied eel. Japanese style smoked eel is delicious, and there's a Greek restaurant near King's Cross that sometimes has it on the menu, and do it very nicely.

But it is always hard to find in shops, in un-jellied, uncooked form. There's a couple of stalls in Borough Market that sell it: http://boroughmarket.org.uk/articles/smoked-eel

 

I have had eel in Sushi but getting them live is best.

I've caught and eaten many fresh eel (in our area they are called ling cod)...gotta know how to clean them though.   Fried in garlic butter is best.  Nice white flesh.  Yummy yummy!

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3 minutes ago, Kayakman said:

I have had eel in Sushi but getting them live is best.

I've caught and eaten many fresh eel (in our area they are called ling cod)...gotta know how to clean them though.   Fried in garlic butter is best.  Nice white flesh.  Yummy yummy!

Ling cod are actually a completely separate species to the freshwater and sea eels we know in Europe, so I wouldn't know how the taste compares.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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13 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

Ling cod are actually a completely separate species to the freshwater and sea eels we know in Europe, so I wouldn't know how the taste compares.

It odd but they are not actually ling cod at all (I've eaten ling cod)....but thats what many people call them up here in the Great Lakes.   They are actually sea lamprey and and are an  invader to the Great Lakes brought in many years ago in ballast.

They are caught since they attach themselves to trout and salmon, when you bring in the fish the lamprey is on them.

All fishermen I know kill them and throw them away as waste....many a face has turned to disgust when I said save them since you can eat them....they think I'm crazy but fresh eel fried in garlic butter is very good.  

Thats how you catch 'em over here.

Lamprey-09-Doug-Owen.jpg

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Okay, the lamprey is a whole different species again.

And remember to eat them in moderation, or you'll end up like Henry I. :wink: 


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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27 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

Okay, the lamprey is a whole different species again.

And remember to eat them in moderation, or you'll end up like Henry I. :wink: 

I stand corrected, and who ever said I couldn't admit I was wrong (that be you Parky),  I thought the lamprey was a form of eel...and I'll gladly admit it...you outwitted me on that second one there.....my knowledge is weak in that area.

DP swears you are master of the wit and I always take DP seriously...his symbol is in a piece of my art.

I'm more interested in your quote there, now just off the top of your head now, answer me the following question,

"What do you know of Alcibiades?"

 

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47 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

Okay, the lamprey is a whole different species again.

And remember to eat them in moderation, or you'll end up like Henry I. :wink: 

I always wondered it....the eel meat in lamprey was/is very different texture and colour.  Thats why, they are probably hard to clean and people throw then away...their jaws are something out of Alien, real gross after you pull themoff the fish...now here is a food no one on  the form has ever eaten, willing to place a bet on this one!

You clean em by going 1/3 down both sides first with a sharp fillet knife...that part it is total waste (don't open it up)...

Next you get newspaper for grasping (skin is slippery)...cut down middle for two symetrical pieces (a forceful power should slice through spine with a good knife)

Wash slime off skin good with paper towel...cube and fry in hot skillett with garlic butter, make chunks bigger rather than smaller.

GET CRACKERS READY!

A NICE COLD CHAMPAGNE GOES WELL WITH IT.

 

 

 

Biology

  • 624px-Lamprey_anatomy.png

    Basic external anatomy of a lamprey

Adults superficially resemble eels in that they have scaleless,elongated bodies, and can range from 13 to 100 cm (5 to 40 inches) in length. Lacking paired fins, adult lampreys have large eyes, one nostril on the top of the head, and seven gill pores on each side of the head. The pharynx is subdivided; the ventral part forming a respiratory tube that is isolated from the mouth by a valve called the velum.

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30 minutes ago, Kayakman said:

I stand corrected, and who ever said I couldn't admit I was wrong (that be you Parky),  I thought the lamprey was a form of eel...and I'll gladly admit it...you outwitted me on that second one there.....my knowledge is weak in that area.

DP swears you are master of the wit and I always take DP seriously...his symbol is in a piece of my art.

I'm more interested in your quote there, now just off the top of your head now, answer me the following question,

"What do you know of Alcibiades?"

 

Alcibiades, apart from being the user-name of a former forum member, is not someone of whom I know much. Unless he also died of a surfeit of lampreys like King Henry, and I don't think he did.

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Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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9 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

Alcibiades, apart from being the user-name of a former forum member, is not someone of whom I know much. Unless he also died of a surfeit of lampreys like King Henry, and I don't think he did.

Thats even more interesting, to name oneself such...the lamprey death does spark a tweek in my mind of Shakesspeare, but a far distant one, lost in the ceaseless noise of the endless waves...this is the way of the life of those who follow the way of the  kayak.

Can't wait to get on the water again...soon but need to be careful of ice....in truth, very high risk of death since the ice packs can move in on ya if the wind changers...and it can happen quick too! Dangerous...time to paddle hard for a long time...all that time in the gym during the off season coming into play!  So glad you did all those deadlifts!  TIME TO MOVE MAN!  SWEAT DRIPPING DOWN...UPPER BODY ON OVERLOAD...LIVIN ON THE EDGE MAN!

Getting a little older now, for a time there I was one of the top paddlers long distance solo on the Planet but I didn't really want that life...wasn't doing this long distance solo shot for the cameras Man!  Met some real interesting people though, long distance paddlers,like free style wrestlers, are a breed of their own...and its a small club.  Can't wait to get on that water again....sometimes I think that from a plane or Helicopter (sometimes they come over, once I raced a sea plane on camera).

Problem is, this screwed up schedule for the Wolfpack, screws everything up for long trips!!!!!!!!  Need to unwind man  but maybe some shorter trips (I have done five solo kayak expeditions of 35-50 days), solo trip[s don't allow me to lose myself!

Decisions, decisions

Hope I haven't bored you with my ramblings,

Kayakman Out (thats my handle with the Coast Guard)

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11 hours ago, Kayakman said:

I have had eel in Sushi but getting them live is best.

I've caught and eaten many fresh eel (in our area they are called ling cod)...gotta know how to clean them though.   Fried in garlic butter is best.  Nice white flesh.  Yummy yummy!

We caught them on long lines. We would catch Flook ( flounder) Eels and Sea Bass.

We had a caravan at Askam and my cousins and I spent all summer there living off the fish. We would sell the flook ( 2 shillings a washing up bowl full... 10p in todays money!) but could not give away the eels or the Sea Bass! So we had to live on the eels as the Bass was a bit of a rarity. Nowadays we would have made a killing with the Bass

We made enough to buy milk, custard powder and rhubarb so that was our staple diet. We made just enough to keep us in ciggies and the odd bag of chips.

There were a few girls down there so at 12, 13 &14 years old with food, fags and some girls to squeeze it was really living the high life.

Happy Days!

Edited by Bearman

Ron Banks

Bears and Barrow

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2 hours ago, Bearman said:

We caught them on long lines. We would catch Flook ( flounder) Eels and Sea Bass.

We had a caravan at Askam and my cousins and I spent all summer there living off the fish. We would sell the flook ( 2 shillings a washing up bowl full... 10p in todays money!) but could not give away the eels or the Sea Bass! So we had to live on the eels as the Bass was a bit of a rarity. Nowadays we would have made a killing with the Bass

We made enough to buy milk, custard powder and rhubarb so that was our staple diet. We made just enough to keep us in ciggies and the odd bag of chips.

There were a few girls down there so at 12, 13 &14 years old with food, fags and some girls to squeeze it was really living the high life.

Happy Days!

Ahh...the good old days...the firmness of it all!

Now they spend all day playing video games and on their phones...if this is progress, well it isn't progress, simple as that.

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This apparently exists - fried egg flavour crisps! I need to find some...

DYRiejVXcAIWKNm.jpg


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Someone on Twitter spotted this creation, from the Isle of Man.

DYpW7lyXkAEkpQo.jpg


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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As this evening's match has kicked off, I have cracked open a bottle of Tesco's Saint Mont. A blend of four very obscure grape varieties (Gros Manseng, Petit Manseng, Arrufiac and Petit Courbu), this is a very refreshing white.

I may well buy more of this, especially when the weather gets warmer.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Spare a thought for poor old Morrissey. Allah has seen fit to dim the light of his wisdom to such an extent that he can no longer locate eggs in a supermarket.

Not that he'd actually want to buy eggs, due to his choice of exclusion-diet eating disorder. In fact, he probably hates eggs as much as he hates the Chinese. But it is apparently some sort of comfort to him if he knows where they are, so he can disapprove of them.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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I work on the Frozen department  in T*S*O. The despair that goes on with customers if they can't find frozen mashed potato amongst other things. Really? Lazy nation we are becoming,

Well having grabbed bargains from work veg wise over the last month, I have prepped then frozen a handful of each one veg to try my own roasted veg. At a cost of probably 6p per handful I've just whacked them all in the oven now with some Tuna steaks. The irony that the Garlic oil I coated them in was £2 for a small bottle :/.

Got to love the plastic microwaveable boxes for freezing extra food than needed for another day.


Like poor jokes? Thejoketeller@mullymessiah

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1 hour ago, Mumby Magic said:

I work on the Frozen department  in T*S*O. The despair that goes on with customers if they can't find frozen mashed potato amongst other things. Really? Lazy nation we are becoming,

Well having grabbed bargains from work veg wise over the last month, I have prepped then frozen a handful of each one veg to try my own roasted veg. At a cost of probably 6p per handful I've just whacked them all in the oven now with some Tuna steaks. The irony that the Garlic oil I coated them in was £2 for a small bottle :/.

Got to love the plastic microwaveable boxes for freezing extra food than needed for another day.

If it is convenient for you or me to make things like this from scratch, then that's good and saves money (and packaging). However, that's not a viable option for many. Here's the Angry Chef's take for the Times, via (for some reason) a church site to avoid the Murdoch paywall: http://www.holynamejesmond.co.uk/uncategorized/the-angry-chef-in-defence-of-preprepared-vegetables-anthony-warner/

I assume that the first two words in the article should actually be one and read "Every".

Edited by Futtocks

Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Rick Steins Fish Pie for tomorrow for the visit of daughter. Nadia Sawalha's Chicken coated in Breadcrumbs and sesame seeds for tonight, if the chicken thaws.


Supporting Rugby League since 1971

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I got some herring for tonight, but haven't decided how to cook it yet.

And I bought ox cheek for tomorrow or Sunday. Season it with salt and pepper, sear it in a frying pan, then into a roasting bag with onions, carrots, garlic, the liquid from deglazing the pan and herbs (thyme, bay leaf, juniper berries). Then, place the bag into a slow cooker and let it cook in its own juices for 4 or more hours. because it is cooked in a small enclosed space, it doesn't need much liquid, as that will come from the meat and onions. It comes out very dark on the outside and deep purple inside, tender enough to eat with just a fork. I sometimes add a little sour cream to the juices in the bag, for a richer gravy.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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23 hours ago, Futtocks said:

I got some herring for tonight, but haven't decided how to cook it yet.

I roasted the herring, stuffed with garlic, chervil and butter. Served with chips. Nice!


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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