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Which of my Xmas books do I read first, John Kear or Bradley Wiggins?

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Sean: "... drank about 20 pints each and I did something stupid."

Signed for Salford?

After only 20 pints? Shurely shome mishtake, Bleep? hic! :P

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Just finished 'The Sorcerer's Apprentices' by Lisa Abend, a book following the unpaid assistants during one season at the legendary Spanish restaurant El Bulli. Very interesting and pretty well-written.

Now onto Graham Greene's collected short stories.

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Started to read The Chimp Paradox by Dr Steve Peters, so far it has been brilliant and really breaks down how and why we do certain things and how we can programme our brain to work in our favour!

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At home, I'm reading a Paul Theroux compilation 'The Tao of Travel', mixing bits and pieces of his own work with sections of other people's travel writing. Just enjoying it as it is, first time through - next time, I'll be making notes of any writers who I want to read more of.

On the train, I have just started 'The Hare with Amber Eyes' by Edmund de Waal, the Radio 4 adaptation of which I enjoyed very much.

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Just found 'A game of thrones' that i bought a year or so back and gave up after 1 chapter. Going to give it another go.

Well part way through the latest book and must say i recommend.

That said killing off a main character or 10 who does not deserve to die loses its shock impact by the time its done for the 200th time in the 3rd book.

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Just started 'Museum without Walls' by the relentlessly sesquipedalian Jonathan Meades. It's a compilation of his various articles, essays etc.

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Just read 'Black by Design' by Pauline Black (Selecter) a very good read and offers a good insight into the 2-Tone era as well as racial issues. Deffo worth a gander.

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I've been working my way through the 'Gormenghast' trilogy for the first time in years. What an amazing writer (and poet, and artist) Mervyn Peake was.

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Andrey Kurkov - The President's last Love. Not quite up to his best (Death and the Penguin), but once you get used to it flitting between three different periods in the narrator's life, a good read.

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This thread needs the year changing otherwise we end up with a 7p fine from the library. :D

 

All the libraries have been closed. :ph34r:

 

But I changed the thread title anyway! B)

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Finished Martin Kelner’s book “Sit Down and Cheer”  recently – a history of sport on TV. I would thoroughly recommend it for anyone on this forum, a packed history which I guess those a little older than I may know a bit about already but it’s fun to see how much the world of sport has changed because of TV. Plenty of RL references as you would expect if you know anything about Mr. Kelner and a bit about how Sky changed RL forever.

 

One of the better lines in the book is RL fans viewing the game going to satellite “with levels of suspicion usually reserved for southerners and Rugby Union” :lol:

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Finished Martin Kelner’s book “Sit Down and Cheer”  recently – a history of sport on TV. I would thoroughly recommend it for anyone on this forum, a packed history which I guess those a little older than I may know a bit about already but it’s fun to see how much the world of sport has changed because of TV. Plenty of RL references as you would expect if you know anything about Mr. Kelner and a bit about how Sky changed RL forever.

 

One of the better lines in the book is RL fans viewing the game going to satellite “with levels of suspicion usually reserved for southerners and Rugby Union” :lol:

I've been thinking about buying that - MK's usually good fun.

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I remember reading Peter Hoeg's book "Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow" about 10/12 years ago and even now every so often I remember the sheer pleasure it gave me. A wonderful book.

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Have just about finished writing my fifth novel to follow on from One Winter, One Spring, One Summer and One Autumn and I am going to call it Two Seasons.

The background will again be one of Work, Family Life and Rugby League this time in 2002 and 2003 in the fictional South Lancashire town of Ashurst

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I remember reading Peter Hoeg's book "Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow" about 10/12 years ago and even now every so often I remember the sheer pleasure it gave me. A wonderful book.

Agreed, a very good read.

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I've just finished reading The Sign of the Four which is a Sherlock Holmes novel to avoid.  Unlike The Hound of the Baskervilles which I read before it.  They are both racist, sexist, ridiculously 'of their time' and absolutely bonkers but the latter is at least coherent and features a large dog and a proper murderer.  They're both free on Kindle - read the Hound and you'll be done in about two hours.

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Eduardo Galeano - Mirrors. A history of the world, no less, told in Galeano's distinctive style of short, laconic tales, often no more than a paragraph or two per story.

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I remember reading Peter Hoeg's book "Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow" about 10/12 years ago and even now every so often I remember the sheer pleasure it gave me. A wonderful book.

I really enjoyed the first half, but it got bogged down in the middle and I gave up.

I saw the film, and I recall thinking the second half of the film was daft.

Two books that I've read and that I enjoyed so much that when I recall them I actually think of the scenes as alsmot like real memories rather than words are The Secret History by Donna Tartt and Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson.

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To help me through two very long flights and a fortnight in a hotel, I have Parade's End and The Siege of Krishnapur with me

I'm about half way through Parade's End (courtesy of 22 hours in the company of Emirates airlines) and enjoying it enormously. Hopefully I'll finish it in time to read The Siege of Krishnapur more or less in one on the way back.

Reading a book from start to finish with no breaks is a real pleasure. But it's rare that I have the time and even rarer that I have the time and the right book.

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