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Futtocks

Book Thread

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Currently ploughing through various book presents. Amongst others:

  • I, Partridge (We need to talk about Alan). Very enjoyable, and I think I'll actually go to the bother of assembling his recommended playlist next time I read it. biggrin.gif
  • P.J.O'Rourke - Holidays in Heck. Not really a sequel to the superb 'Holidays in Hell', but still the best writing I've seen of his for a long time.
  • Ryszard Kapuscinski - Shah of Shahs. Covers the decline of the house of Pahlavi and the beginning of the rule of the Ayatollahs. Brilliantly written as ever.
  • Stuart Maconie - Hope and Glory. Not his best, but still enjoyable and informative.

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I finished Friday Night Lights by H G Bissinger, following the 1988 Permian Panthers high school (American) football team and the passion and devotion of its supporters and those of other teams in Odessa and wider Texas. Quite a remarkable read.

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I have Geoff Lee's

One Winter: Romance, Rock 'n' Roll and Rugby League in the Swinging Sixties

One Summer: Romance, Redundancy and Rugby League in the 1980s

One Autumn: Work, Family Life and Rugby League in the 1990s

One Spring: Romance, Rock 'n' Roll and Rugby League in the 1970's

to get through, which I'm looking forward to.

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I have Geoff Lee's

One Winter: Romance, Rock 'n' Roll and Rugby League in the Swinging Sixties

One Summer: Romance, Redundancy and Rugby League in the 1980s

One Autumn: Work, Family Life and Rugby League in the 1990s

One Spring: Romance, Rock 'n' Roll and Rugby League in the 1970's

to get through, which I'm looking forward to.

Mastersleuth that I am, I think I may have detected a scintilla of a theme, there...

Next up for me is 'The Light's on at Signpost', George MacDonald Fraser's memoir of his time as a Hollywood screenwriter, working with everyone from Steve McQueen, Federico Fellini and Burt Lancaster to Arnold Schwarzenegger and Brigitte Nielsen.

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I am currently reading Danny lockwoods (league weekly editor) The Islamic republic of dewsbury.

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Just finished Start The Car: The World According to Bumble (David Lloyd) which is very funny in places and a good read.

Next up is The Henchmen's Book Club by Danny King.

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... which is very funny in places..

Where do you suggest we read it?

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Where do you suggest we read it?

Now, you see, Heartofgold has told you you were witty now you're trying to force it and you're losing it.

You've crossed over into the mainstream and become less funny, much like Rhod Gilbert.

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Now, you see, Heartofgold has told you you were witty now you're trying to force it and you're losing it.

You've crossed over into the mainstream and become less funny, much like Rhod Gilbert.

'twas a Pavlovian response, I was helpless!

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'twas a Pavlovian response, I was helpless!

You've let yourself down. You can do so much better :biggrin:

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Where do you suggest we read it?

Between the front and back cover is usually best.

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Between the front and back cover is usually best.

Given the author and subject surely cover and deep cover would be more appropriate!!

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Given the author and subject surely cover and deep cover would be more appropriate!!

And have you read any books you'd like to recommend?

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Just released (and straight onto my shopping list) - The Last Holiday by Gil Scott-Heron. Written over 2 decades, it covers various subjects as well as being an autobiography.

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Currently working my way through

51512%2BjKrKL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU02_.jpg

It started off in bizarre fashion but I'm now gripped. Its a book like no other, seen through the eyes of a 15 year old autistic/aspergers boy (not sure which).

Its great stuff once you get into the unusual style of it.

edit: I also started reading Richard Dawkins' Magic of Reality at Christmas, but its too heavy to read in bed! (Insert own joke).

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I have Geoff Lee's

One Winter: Romance, Rock 'n' Roll and Rugby League in the Swinging Sixties

One Summer: Romance, Redundancy and Rugby League in the 1980s

One Autumn: Work, Family Life and Rugby League in the 1990s

One Spring: Romance, Rock 'n' Roll and Rugby League in the 1970's

to get through, which I'm looking forward to.

You'll whizz through them - so good to read that you'll feel like you're there with them. They should be compulsory reading for any self-respecting rugby fan!

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edit: I also started reading Richard Dawkins' Magic of Reality at Christmas, but its too heavy to read in bed! (Insert own joke).

I know what you mean - I've got Mark Twain's autobiography in my 'to read' pile, and the sheer heft of the thing is intimidating. I may need to buy a church lectern!

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Half way through "god is not great" by Hitchens. Fantastic read. Then I have his collection of essays "arguably" to start, that will be a serious undertaking.

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Currently working my way through

51512%2BjKrKL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU02_.jpg

It started off in bizarre fashion but I'm now gripped. Its a book like no other, seen through the eyes of a 15 year old autistic/aspergers boy (not sure which).

That's next for me - a few people have reccomended it to me, so really looking forward to it.

Just finished Room by Emma Donoghue and that has a similarly unique narrative as it's all told from the POV of a 5 year old boy. You wouldn't think it works, but after a few pages it really does. Not read a lot of books lately but despite the occasionally grisly subject matter it was one of the more enjoyable ones.

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Currently ploughing through various book presents. Amongst others:

  • I, Partridge (We need to talk about Alan). Very enjoyable, and I think I'll actually go to the bother of assembling his recommended playlist next time I read it. :D
  • P.J.O'Rourke - Holidays in Heck. Not really a sequel to the superb 'Holidays in Hell', but still the best writing I've seen of his for a long time.
  • Ryszard Kapuscinski - Shah of Shahs. Covers the decline of the house of Pahlavi and the beginning of the rule of the Ayatollahs. Brilliantly written as ever.
  • Stuart Maconie - Hope and Glory. Not his best, but still enjoyable and informative.

I was genuinely disappointed to finish this book, it was perfect Partridge. Not many books would make me actually laugh out loud.

As it's Dickens season I thought I would see what the fuss is about. About 100 pages into Great Expectations and it certainly has a quality about it.

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I was genuinely disappointed to finish this book, it was perfect Partridge. Not many books would make me actually laugh out loud.

It could so easily have been yet another novelty cash-in knock-off for Christmas, but some real work has gone into it. A 'keeper'. :)

And I've now got a fair number of the tracks on his playlist. When complete, I'll re-read and obey instructions. :D

As it's Dickens season I thought I would see what the fuss is about. About 100 pages into Great Expectations and it certainly has a quality about it.

Once you get into his style, you barely notice the blizzard of semicolons. :P

Currently reading some more Kapuscinski; this time 'The Shadow of the Sun', which is a collection of memories of his times in Africa. Just a wonderful, humane chronicler of the world.

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9780241954645.jpg

Used my Christmas tokens to further swell my pretensions and can now recommend Andrew Graham-Dixon's biography/assessment of Caravaggio. As well as a fair and balanced account of a dramatic life that takes in murder, rape, the Knights of St John on Malta, various popes, plague, duels, poems about "Johnny Bo//ock" and the insanity of Italian politics in the 1590s and 1600s it's brilliant at talking about his work and its wider context.

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League Express - Mon 10th April 2017

Rugby League World - April 2017