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Futtocks

Book Thread

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Just finished Room by Emma Donoghue and that has a similarly unique narrative as it's all told from the POV of a 5 year old boy. You wouldn't think it works, but after a few pages it really does. Not read a lot of books lately but despite the occasionally grisly subject matter it was one of the more enjoyable ones.

I thought that was absolutely brilliant.

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Currently working my way through

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It started off in bizarre fashion but I'm now gripped. Its a book like no other, seen through the eyes of a 15 year old autistic/aspergers boy (not sure which).

Its great stuff once you get into the unusual style of it.

I read this a few years back.

Very good. I know Swindon very well so a lot of the locations are very real to me.

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Mark Steel's In Town on my Kindle

At Home, by Bill Bryson in hard copy.

Not up for owt serious at the mo.

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I have Bear Grylls' autobiography Mud, Sweat and Tears on order from the library to enjoy over the weekend.

Today I recieved delivery of Heston Blumenthal The Fat Duck Cookbook for a mere £19. Splendid, my collection of his books is swelling nicely.

I'm not really one for fiction, although I do have my eye on borrowing some horror novels I got a friend for Christmas. Also, I've had Birdsong for a few years now but I never got a round to reading it, and now I'm stuck with a conundrum because I want to watch the BBC adaptation as well! :wacko:

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Working my way through Charlie Owen's quartet of novels set in the fictional northern town of Hanstead. Have finished Horse's ###### and Foxtrot Oscar, now into Bravo Jubilee with Two Tribes to follow. Very funny with a real edge to them, some of the characters are superbly crafted.

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Just finished a re-read of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451. Recommended.

Currently reading 'That old Ace in the Hole' by Annie Proulx. Not quite sure about this one yet.

And, just arrived from Amazon, Gil-Scott-Heron's 'The Last Holiday' and George MacDonald Fraser's 'The Complete McAuslan'. :)

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Currently reading 'That old Ace in the Hole' by Annie Proulx. Not quite sure about this one yet.

Not a whole lot happens, to be honest, but it was okay.

And, just arrived from Amazon, Gil-Scott-Heron's 'The Last Holiday' and George MacDonald Fraser's 'The Complete McAuslan'. :)

Reading the Gil Scott-Heron book while commuting and 'McAuslan' at home. The GS-H takes a while to get into its groove, but is good stuff. Everyone knows his dad played for Celtic, right? But did you also know:

1. As a child, he was one of only three volunteers not to back out when Jackson (Tennessee) decided to end segregation in the city's main high school.

2. He once played Ko-Ko the Executioner in a production of 'The Mikado'. :ohmy:

The 'McAuslan' trilogy is based on George MacDonald Fraser's post-war military career, which was covered in the superb 'Quartered safe out here'. 'McAuslan', on the other hand, is a more fictionalised take on actual events, with names and places changed to protect those involved. It is also written in a more broadly comedic style, but is a great read and very very funny.

It is probably even funnier if you've had actual military experience. The titular soldier is an accident-prone, filthy, unkempt Glaswegian private, described as "the worst soldier since Ancient Pistol" and most of the stories revolve around him and his uncanny ability to muck up everything and anything.

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Left Tony Blairs for a bit. Not Wroted the best. :ph34r:

Read Stanley Gene's and now on Sean Longs. Got Steve Jobs, Lee Evans and Alan Sugar's second to read.

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Thought I needed cheering up a bit so picked up some more Thomas Hardy.

So far I'm enjoying it. I think things will turn out pretty well for young Bathsheba. You can always rely on Hardy for a few laughs and a happy ending.

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Re-reading 'The Raw Shark Texts' by Stephen Hall. A weirdly inventive plot, written pretty well.

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When I heard that Stuart Maconie will be speaking at an event in Waterstones in Leeds in May, I decided to read his book "Pies and Prejudice. In search of the North".

My first impressions on flicking through it are that it looks similar in style and content to "Lancashire Where Women Die of Love" by Charles Nevin, which I thoroughly enjoyed.

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Reading some short stories by Saki at the minute.

Nicely grumpy about the human condition.

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When I heard that Stuart Maconie will be speaking at an event in Waterstones in Leeds in May, I decided to read his book "Pies and Prejudice. In search of the North".

My first impressions on flicking through it are that it looks similar in style and content to "Lancashire Where Women Die of Love" by Charles Nevin, which I thoroughly enjoyed.

I like Maconie's books. 'Adventures on the High Teas' is his search for Middle England and if you like 'Pies and Prejudice' you 'll like this one too.

I'll investigate that Nevin book - thanks. :)

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Reading some short stories by Saki at the minute.

Nicely grumpy about the human condition.

I've lost my Saki collection (must buy another), but the scheming Clovis Sangrail is one of my favourite literary characters, especially in 'The Unrest Cure'. :D

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I've just finished "The man who fell from the sky" by William Norris.

A true story of one of the world's richest men who fell to his death out of an aeroplane halfway across the Channel, a classic locked door mystery, and the search 60 years later for who did it. Written by former Times journo and ITN political correspondent (and a customer of mine!). Fascinating stuff.

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I've lost my Saki collection (must buy another), but the scheming Clovis Sangrail is one of my favourite literary characters, especially in 'The Unrest Cure'. :D

It was a good collection, as good collections go, and as good collections go....

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reading my way through scandinavian crime novels-the usual suspects on my kindle

just finished Headhunter by Jo Nesbo.

The plots are good, but thge quality of writing is #### sometimes.

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Reading world without end by Ken Follett, his sequel to Pillars of the Earth that was on C4 last year, just got The Mauritius Command by Patrick O'Brian. Both on Kindle

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Reading world without end by Ken Follett, his sequel to Pillars of the Earth that was on C4 last year, just got The Mauritius Command by Patrick O'Brian. Both on Kindle

Well, there's a coincidence. I started Pillars of the Earth last night. Cracking opening.

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Thought I needed cheering up a bit so picked up some more Thomas Hardy.

...which I promptly left at someone's house and have therefore given up for now.

I hate it when that happens.

I filled the gap with Adapt, by Tim Harford. Which is excellent.

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Currently re-reading Paul Torday's 'Salmon Fishing in the Yemen', which is very good. I was put off it when it was first given to me, because the title sounded like some novelty thing like 'Round Ireland with a Fridge*'. It is nothing of the kind and the mixture of letters, emails, diary entries and interview transcriptions works well. Plus, Dr Jones' wife Mary is one seriously ghastly fictional creation.

*although that was quite fun, to be honest.

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Currently re-reading Paul Torday's 'Salmon Fishing in the Yemen', which is very good. I was put off it when it was first given to me, because the title sounded like some novelty thing like 'Round Ireland with a Fridge*'. It is nothing of the kind and the mixture of letters, emails, diary entries and interview transcriptions works well. Plus, Dr Jones' wife Mary is one seriously ghastly fictional creation.

*although that was quite fun, to be honest**.

** It was daft. I thought most of it just had to be made up. Well, not that I ...errr....read like it. I was on the latest Stephen Hawkings and I just caught a glimpse of it in Dixons' window......

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** It was daft. I thought most of it just had to be made up. Well, not that I ...errr....read like it. I was on the latest Stephen Hawkings and I just caught a glimpse of it in Dixons' window......

Coincidence - this morning, I have spotted posters for a film of this book. Featuring Ewan McGregor, Emily Blunt and Kristin Scott-Thomas.

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Just finished Robinson Crusoe, which is a classic I thought I knew about but actually proved a great surprise.

I'm now half way through 'Slipless in Settle, a Slow Turn around Northern Cricket" by Harry Pearson, who has written loads of brilliant light-hearted commentary on various aspects of life in the north of England. The pages are turning fast and I love it. If you have any interest in cricket then you'll devour it.

http://www.cricketnetwork.co.uk/main/s66/st166376.htm

edit: apologies for the union advert that pops up on that link

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