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Bedford Roughyed

The TV Thread

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I watched ELO playing a concert in Hyde Park on BBC iPlayer last night. Fantastic stuff. Good to see Jeff Lynne performing live again and sounding great. He seemed genuinely taken aback by the warmth of the reception he got from the crowd and how well the songs went down.

He and his band do seem to be finally gaining some re-acceptance from the public, which is overdue, because they have some great songs.

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He and his band do seem to be finally gaining some re-acceptance from the public, which is overdue, because they have some great songs.

 

I'm not sure ELO's problem was ever with the public, or they wouldn't have sold quite so many records. Music snobs don't like them, but that's their loss. ;)

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I'm not sure ELO's problem was ever with the public, or they wouldn't have sold quite so many records. Music snobs don't like them, but that's their loss. ;)

I'm sure a lot of the people who bought those albums subsequently denied ever having done so, during the years when ELO were considered terminally naff by the self-appointed arbiters of musical fashion. I'm sure a lot of those people were in Hyde Park the other night, absolutely loving it.

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I'm sure a lot of the people who bought those albums subsequently denied ever having done so, during the years when ELO were considered terminally naff by the self-appointed arbiters of musical fashion. I'm sure a lot of those people were in Hyde Park the other night, absolutely loving it.

The Chris Evans Breakfast show on BBC2 on Friday (or was it Thursday) had them live, same with Earth Wind and Fire, it was a cracking show that someone I heard mention that it had the highest listener audience he'd received in a couple of years.  I often picture the mainstream music "critics" like the Comic Store Guy in The Simpsons, all loud blustery opinion and none of it good.  They live on peer pressure but then sneer at the exact same thing that happens in the teeny-pop market with the likes of Beiber.

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The Chris Evans Breakfast show on BBC2 on Friday (or was it Thursday) had them live, same with Earth Wind and Fire, it was a cracking show that someone I heard mention that it had the highest listener audience he'd received in a couple of years.  I often picture the mainstream music "critics" like the Comic Store Guy in The Simpsons, all loud blustery opinion and none of it good.  They live on peer pressure but then sneer at the exact same thing that happens in the teeny-pop market with the likes of Beiber.

Quite. Some people seem to live in constant fear of being caught enjoying the "wrong" bands/records. Especially a band they used to like, but which has since been deemed as having "sold out" which is what happens when they write some songs that people actually want to buy. 

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I saw that Cilla programme and had a quick game of Scouse Bingo. Got 'La' 'Scally' (and Scallies) 'Me Mam' 'Me Dad'.

Just waiting for 'ahh ey' and 'Bizzies'.

Watched a show on Sky Atlantic called The Leftovers. Pretty bloody bizzare.

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I saw that Cilla programme and had a quick game of Scouse Bingo. Got 'La' 'Scally' (and Scallies) 'Me Mam' 'Me Dad'.

Just waiting for 'ahh ey' and 'Bizzies'.

Watched a show on Sky Atlantic called The Leftovers. Pretty bloody bizzare.

 

It's the same with any drama set oop in't North - a cliche fest of how those southern theatrical types think we all speak. All scousers have to speak as demonstrated, all Lancashire/Yorkshire (and are totally interchangeable, well, it's all northern isn't it?) people speak with a generic "north" accent and employ a "t" instead of saying "the". Always. And all gordies begin every sentence with "why aye man".   :dry:

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It's the same with any drama set oop in't North - a cliche fest of how those southern theatrical types think we all speak. All scousers have to speak as demonstrated, all Lancashire/Yorkshire (and are totally interchangeable, well, it's all northern isn't it?) people speak with a generic "north" accent and employ a "t" instead of saying "the". Always. And all gordies begin every sentence with "why aye man".   :dry:

 

In fairness, that is reflected in real life. No person who ever moved to work in London from the Northeast, Yorkshire and Lancashire would ever class themselves as a Southerner, even after living there for thirty years. And they make sure they retain as much as possible of their accent. Same works in reverse for Southerners moving up here. So long as we revel in the banter, it's a major part of fun professionally and socially.

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It's the same with any drama set oop in't North - a cliche fest of how those southern theatrical types think we all speak. All scousers have to speak as demonstrated, all Lancashire/Yorkshire (and are totally interchangeable, well, it's all northern isn't it?) people speak with a generic "north" accent and employ a "t" instead of saying "the". Always. And all gordies begin every sentence with "why aye man".   :dry:

 

I do enjoy it though when the writing/acting is so bad, they get the northern stuff mixed up, and end up saying something like "I'm going down to the t'shop".

 

Something mentioned earlier in the thread but Cuckoo finished last week, and the last half of the series was a lot stronger than the opening I thought. Even an RL mention when one of the annoying neighbours mentioned he'd invented a martial art that was "a cross between Judo and Rugby League". :D

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In fairness, that is reflected in real life. No person who ever moved to work in London from the Northeast, Yorkshire and Lancashire would ever class themselves as a Southerner, even after living there for thirty years. And they make sure they retain as much as possible of their accent. Same works in reverse for Southerners moving up here. So long as we revel in the banter, it's a major part of fun professionally and socially.

 

So people born and bred in Bradford talk exactly the same as those from Wigan do they and say things like "I'm off t't shop to fetch 't paper, 'apen"?

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Oh no, I can't make sense of what quite a lot of people in Lancashire say. I can understand the words okay, just not make any sense of them.

;):tongue:

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Seriously, most people are instinctively proud of where they come from, and that is consciously apparent from their accent. At some level, it must depress people if they lose their regional accent.

 

I bet there are thousands of Yorkshire expats who only watch Emmerdale Farm because it's set in Yorkshire.

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Seriously, most people are instinctively proud of where they come from, and that is consciously apparent from their accent. At some level, it must depress people if they lose their regional accent.

Not everyone. Sue Lawley was from the midlands and Sting was a Geordie yet you wouldn't know it.

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Yes, but do you actually like Sting or Sue Lawley?

Just remembered the old record by The Police - 'Sue Lawley'. Well that was the well funny joke at the time. :)

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Sue Lawley and Margaret Thatcher famously made a conscious effort to lose their accents. I interpret that as a sign that they were ashamed of where they came from. Nobody should ever be ashamed of where they come from; its infused in your bones.

 

To be honest, I can still detect the odd faint Geordie inflection in Sting's voice, but not in Brian Ferry's.

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So people born and bred in Bradford talk exactly the same as those from Wigan do they and say things like "I'm off t't shop to fetch 't paper, 'apen"?

 

You all sound the same to me and I've been up north for 17 years.

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To tell the truth, when I came to Yorkshire, I couldn't distinguish between a basic Yorkshire and a basic Lancashire accent. Nowadays, I can distinguish between Bradford, Dewsbury, Sheffield, Harrogate, Barnsley accents etc

 

Also, when I came to Yorkshire, I struggled to distinguish between the Somerset Yokel accent and the Gloucester Swedebasher accent. Obviously I've still never bothered to learn.

;):tongue:

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To tell the truth, when I came to Yorkshire, I couldn't distinguish between a basic Yorkshire and a basic Lancashire accent. Nowadays, I can distinguish between Bradford, Dewsbury, Sheffield, Harrogate, Barnsley accents etc

 

Also, when I came to Yorkshire, I struggled to distinguish between the Somerset Yokel accent and the Gloucester Swedebasher accent. Obviously I've still never bothered to learn.

;):tongue:

there is no basic yorkshire or basic lancashire accent.

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To tell the truth, when I came to Yorkshire, I couldn't distinguish between a basic Yorkshire and a basic Lancashire accent. Nowadays, I can distinguish between Bradford, Dewsbury, Sheffield, Harrogate, Barnsley accents etc

 

Also, when I came to Yorkshire, I struggled to distinguish between the Somerset Yokel accent and the Gloucester Swedebasher accent. Obviously I've still never bothered to learn.

;):tongue:

 

To be honest I can't tell the difference between west country accents either. I have a mate from the forest who when he has had a few it is virtually impossible to understand all but smattering of words.

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It's come to a pretty pass when Severus won't rise to the bait.

:(

 

 

I'm off for a sulk.

;)

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Nowadays, I can distinguish between,...Harrogate,... accents etc

 

 

Harrogatonians do not have an accent old chap!

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On BBC4 now, Grand Prix: The Killer Years, a brilliant documentary about what I always think of as motor racings golden years. Cruel time.

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On BBC4 now, Grand Prix: The Killer Years, a brilliant documentary about what I always think of as motor racings golden years. Cruel time.

Bit of Cold Chisel on the end credits, I thinks. One for the Aussie TRLers.

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