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BBR

Bolton

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Re Leeds Parish Church.

I guess i was wrong am the island for the ground. I guess I looked at the map and saw the peninsula in the canal by Cclarence street and concluded the ground was there.

The following is what Trevor Delaney said in his book "The Grounds of Rugby League" in the chapter on defunct clubs

" Formed circa 1874-79 as a section of the church recreation club, " "T" lads owert t'bridge" played at Clarence Field, Crown Point, over Crown Point Bridge between the tow path of the Aire-Calder navigation and Clarendon Road just beyond Leeds locks. Bounded by a high wooden fence there were grandstands on each touchline. The record attendance for the ground of 20,000 was set against Runcorn in the 1900 Challenge Cup.......Beyond the far goal was a timber yard which is still there. The site, with cricket fields, which ran at right angles to the rugby field, is today industrial premises "

The book was published in 1991 so things may have changed at the site since then. I note the wording of Clarendon Road rather than Clarence Street. Is this relevant?

I hope, with your local knowledge, you can figure out exactly where it was.

i think the author of the book has not done his research. Clarendon Road does exist, but it is nowhere near to Hunslet - in fact it is not far from Leeds university - and nowhere near water.

I now know whereabouts it was situated to within a couple of hundred yards (give or take) and it is Clarence road (there never has been a Clarence street).

The timber yards as I recall were gone before '91. I suspect that the recreation ground opposite may well have been what he is talking about.

There was a large sports ground further on, but that was on Low Road - now another industrial estate - that was used up to 1987 and was home to Hunslet Nelson CC and also had a football and rugby pitch and a large fence around it. Now I am beginning to wonder if in years gone by, Low road was part of Clarence road. The more I dig the more interesting this becomes.

Not too sure if the Parish church will have records, I could imagine they were destroyed if the side was disbanded by the clergy.

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i think the author of the book has not done his research. Clarendon Road does exist, but it is nowhere near to Hunslet - in fact it is not far from Leeds university - and nowhere near water.

I now know whereabouts it was situated to within a couple of hundred yards (give or take) and it is Clarence road (there never has been a Clarence street).

The timber yards as I recall were gone before '91. I suspect that the recreation ground opposite may well have been what he is talking about.

Trevor Delaney did do his research, an excellent historian.

Clarendon Road is an error, that's in Little Woodhouse. Clarence "Street" was York's ground!!.

The ground WAS on the timber yard.

If you get the right O.S. Map the outline of the pitch and the two stands is marked.

As you travel down CLARENCE ROAD the ground is on the left between the road and the towpath.

50 Yards or less on and you hit the the junction with Carlisle Road, where Carlisle played (only joking)

The best Parish Church article was in Code X111.....

They played in blue and black at one point

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Trevor Delaney did do his research, an excellent historian.

Clarendon Road is an error, that's in Little Woodhouse. Clarence "Street" was York's ground!!.

The ground WAS on the timber yard.

If you get the right O.S. Map the outline of the pitch and the two stands is marked.

As you travel down CLARENCE ROAD the ground is on the left between the road and the towpath.

50 Yards or less on and you hit the the junction with Carlisle Road, where Carlisle played (only joking)

The best Parish Church article was in Code X111.....

They played in blue and black at one point

Thanks. Now I know just where it is.

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Rod Keeligan, that's him. Was very knowledgeable Dennis was a nice man, i bet he was so proud when the twins turned out for Leeds - he always said they would play for them. It's a good few years since I saw him, he used to have a stall on Leeds market, don't know if he still does? Mally's name rings a bell.

Rod's just had his 45th wedding anniversary according to Farcebook.

Not sure if Dennis has retired, but I dropped past the stall last year and one of the twins (maybe Anthony) appeared to be running it himself. I can't remember whether this was confirmed.

My old man reckons the twins could have gone a good bit further in the game if they'd had more variety of coaching when younger, Dennis coached them until they were 16/17 I think.

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Rod's just had his 45th wedding anniversary according to Farcebook.

Not sure if Dennis has retired, but I dropped past the stall last year and one of the twins (maybe Anthony) appeared to be running it himself. I can't remember whether this was confirmed.

My old man reckons the twins could have gone a good bit further in the game if they'd had more variety of coaching when younger, Dennis coached them until they were 16/17 I think.

I played in the age group above the twins,they were very good,Mally Waite coached our age group,always remember the hill in East End Park during pre season,a killer.

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  1. Nigel Killick (he moved to Bradford around the same time as me)

Nigel Killick reffed Kirkholt WMC firsts and seconds in the Pennine League on many occasions. I was secretary at the time and he charged a fortune in expenses and then expected to have his beer bought for him !

He is the only ref I saw (in the amateur game) who penalised the attacking side for not retreating 10 yards at the play-the-ball. This WAS a rule at the time but only ever enforced once.

He used to call one of our bald yet hairy-faced players "beastmaster".

He wasn't a bad ref, a bit idiosyncratic but a real character and I was always pleased to have him ref us even if the treasurer wasn't !

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Nigel Killick reffed Kirkholt WMC firsts and seconds in the Pennine League on many occasions. I was secretary at the time and he charged a fortune in expenses and then expected to have his beer bought for him !

He is the only ref I saw (in the amateur game) who penalised the attacking side for not retreating 10 yards at the play-the-ball. This WAS a rule at the time but only ever enforced once.

He used to call one of our bald yet hairy-faced players "beastmaster".

He wasn't a bad ref, a bit idiosyncratic but a real character and I was always pleased to have him ref us even if the treasurer wasn't !

I agree he was a character. I ran a few lines for him and he could be a bit annoying with his little quirks, but he was a decent ref as some go at that level. I remember how he would often signal FT by standing on the half-way line with his legs astride and blow the whistle while whirling his arms above his head. The players found it quite amusing at times.

Expenses was something I rarely charged and more often than not would end up putting my money back over the bar or the raffles/whatever was going on post match.

He did annoy me in one game in the Leeds and District Sunday league. We had an open age game between two bitter rivals and it required touch judges. He told us to pull them for everything so as not end up with a brawl then told me off for been "On and off like a fiddlers elbow" - this was for punching/gouging - so I did as he wanted and he ended up with a mass punch up instead, and that is the only time I almost fell out with a refereeing colleague.

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I agree he was a character. I ran a few lines for him and he could be a bit annoying with his little quirks, but he was a decent ref as some go at that level. I remember how he would often signal FT by standing on the half-way line with his legs astride and blow the whistle while whirling his arms above his head. The players found it quite amusing at times.

Expenses was something I rarely charged and more often than not would end up putting my money back over the bar or the raffles/whatever was going on post match.

He did annoy me in one game in the Leeds and District Sunday league. We had an open age game between two bitter rivals and it required touch judges. He told us to pull them for everything so as not end up with a brawl then told me off for been "On and off like a fiddlers elbow" - this was for punching/gouging - so I did as he wanted and he ended up with a mass punch up instead, and that is the only time I almost fell out with a refereeing colleague.

Was Nigel the big bloke with the moustache?I remeber we used to have a ref like that in junior games in the early-mid 80's,never knew his name,as we were always told to call the ref "sir".

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Was Nigel the big bloke with the moustache?I remeber we used to have a ref like that in junior games in the early-mid 80's,never knew his name,as we were always told to call the ref "sir".

Hi. Yes that was him. I really did hate been called sir myself, but It did install discipline and respect - something footballers could learn - then again I was at times called things VERY different from sir :lol:

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Hi. Yes that was him. I really did hate been called sir myself, but It did install discipline and respect - something footballers could learn - then again I was at times called things VERY different from sir :lol:

Very good ref,you probably reffed our age group too.It was always impressed upon us to call the ref "Sir",it was amazing what you could get away with when you did that ;)

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Very good ref,you probably reffed our age group too.It was always impressed upon us to call the ref "Sir",it was amazing what you could get away with when you did that ;)

No doubt I will have done, from 86-88, then I smashed my ankle. Although I was grateful to East Leeds as we used to train there and got myself back to full fitness.

I did have one sad regret when I had to send off one of your youngsters at Bus Vale for throwing a punch and it connected. It made me feel down at the time and made me want to pack it in.

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No doubt I will have done, from 86-88, then I smashed my ankle. Although I was grateful to East Leeds as we used to train there and got myself back to full fitness.

I did have one sad regret when I had to send off one of your youngsters at Bus Vale for throwing a punch and it connected. It made me feel down at the time and made me want to pack it in.

it wasn't me!

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it wasn't me!

Thank god for that. If I remember I think he was one of the front rowers, dark hair. It was against Middleton and the lad caught one of theirs with an absolute beauty, he was out cold. Dennis pleaded with me at the time, but I had little choice, it was in front of all my colleagues and the society president was there too and had I not sent him off then I would have been in trouble. But it still hurt to send a youngster off no matter what the circumstances.

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stumbled on this again...for info, Bolton played Bury at weekend (Bury won again) but Des Drummond is now coaching Bolton Mets

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