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Bleep1673

Accents

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I think I have lived in the South for too long. During interviews with Mark Cavendish I keep switching the subtitles on, now I just thought it was because he usually gets interviewed straight after a sprint finish, but I saw an interview with him at the weekend & I still had to listen carefully to what he had to say.

Then last night I was watching Guy Martin on C4's How Britain Worked, and found myself putting the subtitles on again.

Or is it just their particular accents?

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they, like me, don't have an accent. :rolleyes:

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they, like me, don't have an accent. :rolleyes:

I've met you and sorry to say this but you do :P

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I've met you and sorry to say this but you do :P

He's right you know :D

I think this thread proves conclusively, Northern folk talk funny. :ph34r:

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no no no no no. it's everyone else that has the accent, tha' nose! :O

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Most people (i.e my sisters!!) who live south of Birmingham can watch, say, Coronation Street and not be able to tell which actors have Yorkshire accents and which have Lancashire accents. The actors are seen as having "Northern accents". The exception I would say is the Barnsley accent which is very distinct.

Similarly, most people in Yorkshire and Lancashire would not readily separate a West Wales accent from a Valleys accent. Again, the exception would be the distinctive Cardiff accent.

One thing that I would certainly not be able to do is distinguish the inter-London accents. Fortunately, I dont think I'll ever have need to go there for long enough to find out! ;):)

With regard to the original post, I have terrible problems in picking up dialogue in American films and telly programmes. Too often, the actors seem to run the words of a sentence into each other. I can cope with it in British drama without problem.

I once worked in Glasgow; I could understand the majority of what was said by women but was completely flummoxed by the men's accent. I used to go for my dinner at Morrisons supermarket every day and, to order, started by just pointing at one of the pictured meals printed on the large menu board at the entrance to the cafe. :D

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I speak with an old downtown Leeds accent I.E Liz Dawn,maurice Bamford etc,and I live near Philadelphia PA and very few locals recognise it as a regional English accent."what of Ireland do you come from?oh you sound irish,but its a lovely Scottish brogue?"I never thought a Leeds accent could be described as a lovely brogue

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I think I have lived in the South for too long. During interviews with Mark Cavendish I keep switching the subtitles on, now I just thought it was because he usually gets interviewed straight after a sprint finish, but I saw an interview with him at the weekend & I still had to listen carefully to what he had to say.

Then last night I was watching Guy Martin on C4's How Britain Worked, and found myself putting the subtitles on again.

Or is it just their particular accents?

Guy Martin does have quite a strong North Lincolnshire accent but he tends to tone it down when he's on the box.

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One thing I've often wondered about is the odd distinctiveness of the Liverpool accent, compared to the surrounding (quite close) areas.

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I speak with an old downtown Leeds accent I.E Liz Dawn,maurice Bamford etc

ie common as muck!! ;)

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I never thought a Leeds accent could be described as a lovely brogue

You can't understand the Yankee accent; they said you were a lively rogue.

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You can't understand the Yankee accent; they said you were a lively rogue.

Lastnight I got another barfly wanting to talk about the beatles and the stones ,they seem obsessed

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ie common as muck!! ;)

I know that,you know that ,but Liz dawn ,and Maurice Bamford have a lovely brogue according to the thick septics

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One thing I've often wondered about is the odd distinctiveness of the Liverpool accent, compared to the surrounding (quite close) areas.

I think it comes from the large influx of both Irish and Welsh during the 19th century. If you listen to the Scouse accent you can pick up distinct Bits of both.

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It does but it also has more than a passing resemblance to the Stoke accent or certain West Cumbrian ones. Migration from Ireland may be a cause but it's not as isolated as you might think.

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Anyone hear Ian McMillans excellent Radio 4 piece "The 'a r s e that Jack built! ? see http://www.bbc.co.uk...rammes/b01ljwm4

Somewhere between Sheffield and Chesterfield, people stop saying house and say something that sounds a lot more like '######. It's an isogloss, a kind of linguistic boundary line where accent and dialect changes. Ian calls it the house / ###### interface, and with his friend the musician Ray Hearne and linguist Kate Burland in tow, he sets out to track it down

Would you look at that! The filter does not like regional accents: ####### indeed! 'a r s e !!

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It does but it also has more than a passing resemblance to the Stoke accent ...

Dunna say that, duck|! They tow crate in Staffy Cher, anyhow, Mar necks dower kne burr scorra kind slice on Benty Lay

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I wonder where the isogloss is, somewhere East of Selby, where a phone becomes a fern?

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I wonder where the isogloss is, somewhere East of Selby, where a phone becomes a fern?

According to linguists that line has moved to just east of Huddersfield

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Dunna say that, duck|! They tow crate in Staffy Cher, anyhow, Mar necks dower kne burr scorra kind slice on Benty Lay

I've lived in stoke nearly ten years and understand none of that...

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I spent a couple of hours in a pub recently explaining the differences between the various London accents to an Aussie friend. Not sure she came out any the wiser tbh.

The word 'house' is an obvious one. East and south Londoners mangle it into aars. West Londoners (like me) simply drop the h so it becomes 'ouse. Greenwich is an interesting one. My paternal granddad, from south of the river, used to say grenidge (with a hard d) whilst the maternal grandfather, from north of the river called it grinich. Places like St Marylebone and Holborn were pronounced differently too. The south Londoner also called onions ungions, and rhubarb rhubub.

These would all be working class varieties of course, posher folk from the same locations would sound different again.

The accent I have and the ones I grew up with (I'm only 33 btw) seem to be disappearing as people get priced out of living here and move to the edges of the city and to commuter towns. London has huge numbers of immigrants, from across the UK and around the world, and the accents are changing noticeably. The varieties now seem to be based more along ethnic lines rather than location.

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I speak with an old downtown Leeds accent I.E Liz Dawn,maurice Bamford etc,and I live near Philadelphia PA and very few locals recognise it as a regional English accent."what of Ireland do you come from?oh you sound irish,but its a lovely Scottish brogue?"I never thought a Leeds accent could be described as a lovely brogue

:O:ohmy::O A lovely brogue! That slack Leeds accent! :) By 'eck.

Americans often struggle to distinguish Scottish, Irish, English, Welsh, Australian and South African accents, never mind regional accents in my experience.

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One thing I've often wondered about is the odd distinctiveness of the Liverpool accent, compared to the surrounding (quite close) areas.

The Scouse accent has the nasal quality that is found in the Dublin accent. The Liverpool accent has spread well into North Wales also.

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My Dewsbury accent has mellowed slightly after living in NZ for 14 years,but it is still strong enough for Kiwis to think I am Scottish or Irish.

I love to hear any accents from home,there is so much variation.In NZ the accent tends to be all the same unless you come from the bottom of the South Island which has a slightly different accent to the rest of the country.I find Brits struggle to pick the difference between Kiwi and Aussie accents until you have heard a few then you realise the Aussie accent is simply awful!

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