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l'angelo mysterioso

TRL USofA helpdesk

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thanks Mark

no banks robbed, just a lifetime of graft, and don't take this the wrong way, but I don't give a flying fart about Featherstone Rovers..

Nice, you'll have a great time. I love the architecture there. Perhaps because it's been the scene of so much film & TV over the years I found it a very photogenic place. Took loads of B&W shots.

You know what they say though, once a capper........ ;)

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DC's a government town, so don’t expect New York. But it’s the government town, so it still has a buzz if you like that kind of thing.

There are almost too many great museums etc to take in, but you can’t go far wrong with the Air & Space, and the Museum of American History is pretty good too – it has the original star-spangled banner, which is incredible – and the Newseum, which is a relative newcomer.

You’ll probably end up doing Georgetown – which is classic WASP/politico Washington - and maybe Adams Morgan (check out The Black Squirrel on 18th St for beer) and Dupont Circle. Go for weekend brunch at Kramerbooks’ Afterwords cafe, just off Dupont – it’s far from the best brunch in the city, but it’s a DC institution (and you get to browse in a great bookstore while you wait for a table). Kramerbooks also has a separate bar, with some great beers. Nothing like going out to buy a book and getting drunk at the same time.

The 14th Street corridor is an increasingly good area at the moment - north of Thomas Circle, up to U Street. It’s a big stretch of road, heading north. It used to be a real skid row area, but the whole Logan Circile neighbourhood is changing now, with shops, restaurants, cafes etc. If you like craft beers, there’s an excellent place on 14th Street called Churchkey – an upstairs bar, with American bar food. It gets busy, but it’s got a great selection. There’s also a higher-end restaurant on the ground floor called Birch & Barley. If you can grab a booth at Churchkey, you’re sorted for the night. I also like Masa further up on 14th Street – it’s a fashionable hangout (Obama staffers and younger republicans), bit pricey, but excellent food and good atmosphere.

U Street is changing too – there’s some good places up there now, though they might be a touch ‘hip’ for your tastes. But if you like to hang out in black areas and not just white areas, then U Street is the most famous strip, despite going through some very tough times since the race riots in the 60s. The most famous place to visit is Ben’s Chili Bowl – it’s DC’s most famous black restaurant, and a campaign stop-off. The original Busboys & Poets is also at 14th & V, just up from U Street. Also The Gibson on 14th, near U Street, for a late night speakeasy bar (owned by the Thievery Corporation guys).

For music, I’m guessing somewhere like Blues Alley in Georgetown would probably suit you, just off the main drag M Street. The sad thing about DC is that the city’s authentic and unique black sound - go-go music – is so hard for whites/tourists to track down. But if you do get the chance, check it out - go-go is a live experience, and there’s nothing like a three-hour non-stop go-go bomb being dropped.

The most tiring thing about DC is getting around. You might find it too cold at the moment, but the bikeshare scheme is absolutely fantastic in a place like DC – US cities are so easy to navigate, and bike riding is much, much less scary than in the UK. The bikes are easily the best way of seeing DC in a limited time – getting to places like Georgetown which aren’t on the Metro, and especially getting around the Mall (which is much further to walk than most tourists imagine). Just make sure you re-dock within the thirty minute window and pick up a new bike if you want to go further, or it will start to charge extra. If you really want to be a tourist there are Segway tours of the Mall for those who don’t like walking too much.

And you'll enjoy the train the NYC - if you're a fan of The Wire you'll get to see the infamous row houses in Baltimore....

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DC's a government town, so don’t expect New York. But it’s the government town, so it still has a buzz if you like that kind of thing.

There are almost too many great museums etc to take in, but you can’t go far wrong with the Air & Space, and the Museum of American History is pretty good too – it has the original star-spangled banner, which is incredible – and the Newseum, which is a relative newcomer.

You’ll probably end up doing Georgetown – which is classic WASP/politico Washington - and maybe Adams Morgan (check out The Black Squirrel on 18th St for beer) and Dupont Circle. Go for weekend brunch at Kramerbooks’ Afterwords cafe, just off Dupont – it’s far from the best brunch in the city, but it’s a DC institution (and you get to browse in a great bookstore while you wait for a table). Kramerbooks also has a separate bar, with some great beers. Nothing like going out to buy a book and getting drunk at the same time.

The 14th Street corridor is an increasingly good area at the moment - north of Thomas Circle, up to U Street. It’s a big stretch of road, heading north. It used to be a real skid row area, but the whole Logan Circile neighbourhood is changing now, with shops, restaurants, cafes etc. If you like craft beers, there’s an excellent place on 14th Street called Churchkey – an upstairs bar, with American bar food. It gets busy, but it’s got a great selection. There’s also a higher-end restaurant on the ground floor called Birch & Barley. If you can grab a booth at Churchkey, you’re sorted for the night. I also like Masa further up on 14th Street – it’s a fashionable hangout (Obama staffers and younger republicans), bit pricey, but excellent food and good atmosphere.

U Street is changing too – there’s some good places up there now, though they might be a touch ‘hip’ for your tastes. But if you like to hang out in black areas and not just white areas, then U Street is the most famous strip, despite going through some very tough times since the race riots in the 60s. The most famous place to visit is Ben’s Chili Bowl – it’s DC’s most famous black restaurant, and a campaign stop-off. The original Busboys & Poets is also at 14th & V, just up from U Street. Also The Gibson on 14th, near U Street, for a late night speakeasy bar (owned by the Thievery Corporation guys).

For music, I’m guessing somewhere like Blues Alley in Georgetown would probably suit you, just off the main drag M Street. The sad thing about DC is that the city’s authentic and unique black sound - go-go music – is so hard for whites/tourists to track down. But if you do get the chance, check it out - go-go is a live experience, and there’s nothing like a three-hour non-stop go-go bomb being dropped.

The most tiring thing about DC is getting around. You might find it too cold at the moment, but the bikeshare scheme is absolutely fantastic in a place like DC – US cities are so easy to navigate, and bike riding is much, much less scary than in the UK. The bikes are easily the best way of seeing DC in a limited time – getting to places like Georgetown which aren’t on the Metro, and especially getting around the Mall (which is much further to walk than most tourists imagine). Just make sure you re-dock within the thirty minute window and pick up a new bike if you want to go further, or it will start to charge extra. If you really want to be a tourist there are Segway tours of the Mall for those who don’t like walking too much.

And you'll enjoy the train the NYC - if you're a fan of The Wire you'll get to see the infamous row houses in Baltimore....

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The sad thing about DC is that the city’s authentic and unique black sound - go-go music – is so hard for whites/tourists to track down. But if you do get the chance, check it out - go-go is a live experience, and there’s nothing like a three-hour non-stop go-go bomb being dropped.</span></span>

Hmm... the mental image of Chris frugging maniacally at a full-on Go-Go session. :D

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DC's a government town, so don’t expect New York. But it’s the government town, so it still has a buzz if you like that kind of thing.

There are almost too many great museums etc to take in, but you can’t go far wrong with the Air & Space, and the Museum of American History is pretty good too – it has the original star-spangled banner, which is incredible – and the Newseum, which is a relative newcomer.

You’ll probably end up doing Georgetown – which is classic WASP/politico Washington - and maybe Adams Morgan (check out The Black Squirrel on 18th St for beer) and Dupont Circle. Go for weekend brunch at Kramerbooks’ Afterwords cafe, just off Dupont – it’s far from the best brunch in the city, but it’s a DC institution (and you get to browse in a great bookstore while you wait for a table). Kramerbooks also has a separate bar, with some great beers. Nothing like going out to buy a book and getting drunk at the same time.

The 14th Street corridor is an increasingly good area at the moment - north of Thomas Circle, up to U Street. It’s a big stretch of road, heading north. It used to be a real skid row area, but the whole Logan Circile neighbourhood is changing now, with shops, restaurants, cafes etc. If you like craft beers, there’s an excellent place on 14th Street called Churchkey – an upstairs bar, with American bar food. It gets busy, but it’s got a great selection. There’s also a higher-end restaurant on the ground floor called Birch & Barley. If you can grab a booth at Churchkey, you’re sorted for the night. I also like Masa further up on 14th Street – it’s a fashionable hangout (Obama staffers and younger republicans), bit pricey, but excellent food and good atmosphere.

U Street is changing too – there’s some good places up there now, though they might be a touch ‘hip’ for your tastes. But if you like to hang out in black areas and not just white areas, then U Street is the most famous strip, despite going through some very tough times since the race riots in the 60s. The most famous place to visit is Ben’s Chili Bowl – it’s DC’s most famous black restaurant, and a campaign stop-off. The original Busboys & Poets is also at 14th & V, just up from U Street. Also The Gibson on 14th, near U Street, for a late night speakeasy bar (owned by the Thievery Corporation guys).

For music, I’m guessing somewhere like Blues Alley in Georgetown would probably suit you, just off the main drag M Street. The sad thing about DC is that the city’s authentic and unique black sound - go-go music – is so hard for whites/tourists to track down. But if you do get the chance, check it out - go-go is a live experience, and there’s nothing like a three-hour non-stop go-go bomb being dropped.

The most tiring thing about DC is getting around. You might find it too cold at the moment, but the bikeshare scheme is absolutely fantastic in a place like DC – US cities are so easy to navigate, and bike riding is much, much less scary than in the UK. The bikes are easily the best way of seeing DC in a limited time – getting to places like Georgetown which aren’t on the Metro, and especially getting around the Mall (which is much further to walk than most tourists imagine). Just make sure you re-dock within the thirty minute window and pick up a new bike if you want to go further, or it will start to charge extra. If you really want to be a tourist there are Segway tours of the Mall for those who don’t like walking too much.

And you'll enjoy the train the NYC - if you're a fan of The Wire you'll get to see the infamous row houses in Baltimore....

superb I'll be checking out loads of those destinations.

thanks cw

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Hmm... the mental image of Chris frugging maniacally at a full-on Go-Go session. :D

you haven't lived if you haven't seen my shapes

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Philadelphia,Reading terminal market for a Philly Steak and home made Amish food.In South Philly they really do talk like Rocky.The Art museum is well worth a visit too,its not just paintings its lots of other artifacts too it ha an armouries and the architectural section is brilliant.In the old town the constitution centre is good,but Betsy Ross's house is funny they a queueing up for tours and there are 100s of houses like that in the Burley area of Leeds

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Tried to get into the US A twice now. Been refused a visa both times, apparently due to political affiliations, my mum said the only way I would get into America would be to either travel to Cuba, and try and get refugee status (or I could do a Felix Baumgartner & parachute in)

How could they possibly know of your political affiliations unless you wrote "by the way I'm a dirty commie" on your application form?

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How could they possibly know of your political affiliations unless you wrote "by the way I'm a dirty commie" on your application form?

How did it go in the Macarthy witch hunts for un american activities? "I am not now nor have I ever been a member of the communist party"

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How could they possibly know of your political affiliations unless you wrote "by the way I'm a dirty commie" on your application form?

The lad I visited in America applied for his visa at the same time as a work colleague working at the same company as him in the UK. Despite my pal having a better degree, his colleague was granted a visa well before him. The reason for his delay was because he was a member of the Labour party. Can't give you any more specific details but I remember him telling me this as fact.

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How did it go in the Macarthy witch hunts for un american activities? "I am not now nor have I ever been a member of the communist party"

What kind of idiot would answer "Yes, that's me!"?

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The lad I visited in America applied for his visa at the same time as a work colleague working at the same company as him in the UK. Despite my pal having a better degree, his colleague was granted a visa well before him. The reason for his delay was because he was a member of the Labour party. Can't give you any more specific details but I remember him telling me this as fact.

How could they possibly know that he was a Labour party member?

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What kind of idiot would answer "Yes, that's me!"?

How could they possibly know that he was a Labour party member?

People do get successfully blocked from travelling to certain countries. It's not actually that hard to believe that it happens.

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What kind of idiot would answer "Yes, that's me!"?

quite

I recently experienced those questions when applying. I don't know what they are meant to achieve: 'are you a member of a terrorist organisation'(I'm paraphrasing) is just laughable.

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Basically, they can kick you out for lying on your visa application if they discover that you are a terrorist rather than go through the courts.

It is very difficult to keep a straight face through those questions, one would have thought that the communist threat is a thing of the past.

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People do get successfully blocked from travelling to certain countries. It's not actually that hard to believe that it happens.

If you happen to be a well known radical perhaps but somebody who is an ordinary rank-and-file member of a far-left group?

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If you happen to be a well known radical perhaps but somebody who is an ordinary rank-and-file member of a far-left group?

I've no idea but they have occasionally picked out brown people who in their radical days belonged to proscribed Islamic groups (but who now don't) so it's not outside the realms of possibility that a communist would be on a blacklist.

That said, I find it more likely that Bleep ticked the box saying he was going to commit a crime of gross moral turpitude.

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The lad I visited in America applied for his visa at the same time as a work colleague working at the same company as him in the UK. Despite my pal having a better degree, his colleague was granted a visa well before him. The reason for his delay was because he was a member of the Labour party. Can't give you any more specific details but I remember him telling me this as fact.

Been a Labour member for years and visited the US four times with no problems whatsoever.

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BTW, New York is just a big city, one of many. It's alright, but people will tell you it's the most amazing city in the World and they're just getting giddy because they live in Leigh or somewhere and they rarely travel past the bottom of their road.

You can get the same international, multicultural city experience by visiting London (although the flights to NY probably cost less than the train to London)

Go to Boston. Much nicer, and a whole bunch of interesting history. The JFK Presidential Library is wonderful.

The best place I visited

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BTW, New York is just a big city, one of many. It's alright, but people will tell you it's the most amazing city in the World and they're just getting giddy because they live in Leigh or somewhere and they rarely travel past the bottom of their road.

You can get the same international, multicultural city experience by visiting London (although the flights to NY probably cost less than the train to London)

Go to Boston. Much nicer, and a whole bunch of interesting history. The JFK Presidential Library is wonderful.

The best place I visited

maybe next time Steve

I've been pracicing saying 'gimme a dworg easy on the mustartd' for too long to change tack. And we're off to Washington as well anyway.

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New York is a brilliant city. I love it. Been three times. Loads to see and do, museums, parks, galleries. Great food. Nice people.

Never been to Washington.

I have been to Washington,but went on the bus,and that stopped round the vicinity of the Capitol which is well worth seeing,but it seemed a long way fro the City itself

You robbed a bank L'Ang or what? I?ll text you the Fev v Leigh scores if you miss the game.

What kind of idiot would answer "Yes, that's me!"?

NICE ONE

quite

I recently experienced those questions when applying. I don't know what they are meant to achieve: 'are you a member of a terrorist organisation'(I'm paraphrasing) is just laughable.

dont do the visa waiver thing now,but when I did the question about being involved in the german nazi party,I thought surely that one in no longer required

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BTW, New York is just a big city, one of many. It's alright, but people will tell you it's the most amazing city in the World and they're just getting giddy because they live in Leigh or somewhere and they rarely travel past the bottom of their road.

You can get the same international, multicultural city experience by visiting London (although the flights to NY probably cost less than the train to London)

Go to Boston. Much nicer, and a whole bunch of interesting history. The JFK Presidential Library is wonderful.

The best place I visited

If someone goes to Boston, they should contact me and then follow my instructions to the letter.

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How could they possibly know that he was a Labour party member?

No idea, never asked him at the time. I suppose I assumed he'd ticked a box somewhere then expanded on it.

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