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Kenilworth Tiger

David Bowie

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I might be mistaken but I think Mick Ronson was the only member of The Rats who went on to become one of the Spiders From Mars. There was another link from The Rats to Bowie though and that was drummer John Cambridge, who worked with Bowie before Mick did. It was Cambridge who came back to Hull to recruit Mick for Bowie's band.

I knew you'd come up with the goods

rthey were a cracking band-before their time in many ways.

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An artist who has been hugely influential in various different areas and over a very long period of time. You would struggle to find many British solo artists that have had the same amount of influence. As for being relevant, the amount of interest in his return to the studio amongst art and music critics would show he is still considered relevant and contemporary. This return is about new material and not some retro nostalgia tour it is not clear if he will even tour. Whether he was a trendsetter is largely debatable but there is some truth in it.

You are confusing 'I do not like David Bowie or his music' with him having no relevance.

no I asked the poster what he thought Bowie was relevant to. I'm asking you now that you as the other poster did, invoked it in a meaningless way. Influential? In his field and amomgst his admirers-but leeching onto trends asoprting them to look cool and artistic: right from thr lerague of long haired men, lyndsay kemp and mime, the eternally super cool weimar republic, the already bubbling androgynous glam scene and so on. He wrote some good songs, but not many...but that is a value judgement of mine. Most of pop music if not all of it is phoney: Bowie was and seemingly is again an oiutstanding example of it.

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I knew you'd come up with the goods

rthey were a cracking band-before their time in many ways.

It was my mam who told me many years ago about John Cambridge working with Bowie. She was friends with John's mam.

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Bowie's done lots of stuff over the years that I absolutely love. He's also come out with some dreadfully pretentious codswallop at the same time, often on the same album. 'Hunky Dory' and 'Ziggy Stardust' have some fantastic songs, especially.

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I have liked Bowie since I first saw him on Top of the Pops in the early/mid-70s. I think Ziggy, Station to Staion and Low are particularly good albums.

He has made a number of mistakes both in some of the records he made and one or two of his pronouncements.

David Bowie is obviously relevant to his audience - they people who like his music.

How was he phoney ? When he made some soul-influenced albums he referred to them as "Plastic Soul" - he knew he wasn't from Philly.

Were the Beatles and the Stones phonies for recording Tamla / R&B originals ? Were the Band phonies for recording in an American style when they were mostly Canadian. Are Kraftwerk phonies for using electronic instruments ?

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Did he ever record "The Emperor's New Clothes"? I have an opinion, he's not my cup of tea. Still, each to his own, live and let live.

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Ashes to Ashes was a great song but this latest release is atrocious....Radio 2 are creaming themselves over it but it's absolute dirge and possibly the most depressing song I've heard in a long time

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Ashes to Ashes was a great song

I never understood what it was about?

can you help?

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A lot of his lyrics are piffle, but the good songs sound good anyway.

'Life on Mars' for instance - "It's on America's tortured brow/that Mickey Mouse has grown up a cow". Anyone?

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I never understood what it was about?

can you help?

Nope....but I never pay much attention to lyrics anyway......but the musical composition and arrangement is fantastic

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A lot of his lyrics are piffle, but the good songs sound good anyway.

'Life on Mars' for instance - "It's on America's tortured brow/that Mickey Mouse has grown up a cow". Anyone?

Well yes but surely everybody could relate to 'Sailors fighting in the dance hall'.

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'Life on Mars' for instance - "It's on America's tortured brow/that Mickey Mouse has grown up a cow". Anyone?

Clearly a reference to capitalist America and how Mickey Mouse, symbolic of youthful innocence had become the cash cow for Disney.

See this music critic lark is a doddle. ;)

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Clearly a reference to capitalist America and how Mickey Mouse, symbolic of youthful innocence had become the cash cow for Disney.

See this music critic lark is a doddle. ;)

rhymes with 'brow' in the previous but one line as well.

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Bowie's done lots of stuff over the years that I absolutely love. He's also come out with some dreadfully pretentious codswallop at the same time, often on the same album. 'Hunky Dory' and 'Ziggy Stardust' have some fantastic songs, especially.

Agreed but dont most artists,Bowie inspired a later generation of artists,mind you this latest offering is a bit suicidal

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rhymes with 'brow' in the previous but one line as well.

And yet you still deny Bowie's genius...? ;)

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I never understood what it was about?

can you help?

Nope !

Never quite understood what "Desolation Row" or "Visions of Johanna" were about but still love 'em.

"Harmonicas play the skeleton keys out in the rain" anyone ?

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I find it strange that people think that lyrics have to mean something. Even as a kid I remember the fuss of critics tying to fathom the meaning of songs like "I am the Walrus". The reality was that Lennon got so p****d off analysing every lyric of his that he chose to write nonsense. It still works as a song.

And that's the point, song lyrics don't have to have any explicit meaning, they could be shooby doo wap and still sound good.

As for Bowie's new single, I think it is a tremendous track. I was never an out and out Bowie fan as a kid, although I remember being surrounded by fantastic singles through my teenage years and beyond. "Where are we now" comes across as a very reflective piece, and expresses something a lot of us 'oldies; go through. Thinking back to youth, thinking about how it got us to where we are now, and how it is going to influence the time we have left. Perhaps it is an age thing, perhaps an artist such as this reflects some of our thoughts and feelings - much more than, say, than giving numerous young maidens "every inch of our love".

We are at that stage where many of our rock heroes are old men, or certainly aging men, and we should get used to the fact that they may sing, and write lyrics, about subjects that reflect their time of life.

As for the song itself, it reminds me of the stuff on an album of a past recording partner of his, John Lennon Plastic Ono Band. Basic, stripped back instrumentals, haunting, bleak lyrics delivered with what seems like real emotion. I don't know if his voice has 'gone', or whether he has adopted the style for the song; either way if feels appropriate for the song. The sad fact that the voice can weaken as the years pass, but I don't recall vocal power being Bowie's speciality anyway. It's just an obstacle that has to be worked around.

As for being 'relevant', I don't want to speak for the person who suggested he still is, but I take that term to mean that an artist can still contribute something to the genre - which in Bowie's case is pop/rock music. From what I've heard, the impression I have is that he still can; much more so than, say, someone like the Stones, a group that doesn't seem to have had a creative idea for at least three decades.

As I said earlier, my experience of Bowie was the singles I heard on the radio. His albums largely passed my by (I had other priorities for my hard-earned), but on the strength of this single I will be buying the new album in March.

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I suspect Bowie was on drugs when he wrote some of this stuff. Clearly these were not performance enhancing drugs. Nevertheless, a confession on Opera Winfield would not go amiss...followed by a lifetime ban.

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Nope !

Never quite understood what "Desolation Row" or "Visions of Johanna" were about but still love 'em.

"Harmonicas play the skeleton keys out in the rain" anyone ?

and your point is?

You appear to have missed the pun in the line you quote.

The dystopian picture that Dylan paints in the song you mention is fairly clear one would have thought.

I'm not keen on David Bowie and I've said why. If you like his music and all that goes with it: not a problem.

a poster mentioned a song. I didn't understand the words to the song song and for asked his/her assistance.

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I find it strange that people think that lyrics have to mean something. Even as a kid I remember the fuss of critics tying to fathom the meaning of songs like "I am the Walrus". The reality was that Lennon got so p****d off analysing every lyric of his that he chose to write nonsense. It still works as a song.

And that's the point, song lyrics don't have to have any explicit meaning, they could be shooby doo wap and still sound good.

As for Bowie's new single, I think it is a tremendous track. I was never an out and out Bowie fan as a kid, although I remember being surrounded by fantastic singles through my teenage years and beyond. "Where are we now" comes across as a very reflective piece, and expresses something a lot of us 'oldies; go through. Thinking back to youth, thinking about how it got us to where we are now, and how it is going to influence the time we have left. Perhaps it is an age thing, perhaps an artist such as this reflects some of our thoughts and feelings - much more than, say, than giving numerous young maidens "every inch of our love".

We are at that stage where many of our rock heroes are old men, or certainly aging men, and we should get used to the fact that they may sing, and write lyrics, about subjects that reflect their time of life.

As for the song itself, it reminds me of the stuff on an album of a past recording partner of his, John Lennon Plastic Ono Band. Basic, stripped back instrumentals, haunting, bleak lyrics delivered with what seems like real emotion. I don't know if his voice has 'gone', or whether he has adopted the style for the song; either way if feels appropriate for the song. The sad fact that the voice can weaken as the years pass, but I don't recall vocal power being Bowie's speciality anyway. It's just an obstacle that has to be worked around.

As for being 'relevant', I don't want to speak for the person who suggested he still is, but I take that term to mean that an artist can still contribute something to the genre - which in Bowie's case is pop/rock music. From what I've heard, the impression I have is that he still can; much more so than, say, someone like the Stones, a group that doesn't seem to have had a creative idea for at least three decades.

As I said earlier, my experience of Bowie was the singles I heard on the radio. His albums largely passed my by (I had other priorities for my hard-earned), but on the strength of this single I will be buying the new album in March.

it isn't a question of analysis well no further than sniffing out pretension anyway...something which John Lennon was guilty of frequently.

It's only rock n' roll...now that's a line with a meaning.

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Tis a bit like art...or painting. Its the overall (generally emotional) impression on the senses that counts. I can look at say a Turner, or a Constable or a Poussin and that creates an emotional impression because of its representation of something I sort of recognise as real or nearly real. I can also look at say Guernica which coveys in my mind the all the horror of that event without it being an accurate photograph. I can even appreciate a Jackson Pollock because of its associations with the immediate after-effects of my drunken stag-night at the Domino Club in Grey Mare Lane, Openshaw in June 1967

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Tis a bit like art...or painting. Its the overall (generally emotional) impression on the senses that counts. I can look at say a Turner, or a Constable or a Poussin and that creates an emotional impression because of its representation of something I sort of recognise as real or nearly real. I can also look at say Guernica which coveys in my mind the all the horror of that event without it being an accurate photograph. I can even appreciate a Jackson Pollock because of its associations with the immediate after-effects of my drunken stag-night at the Domino Club in Grey Mare Lane, Openshaw in June 1967

Never let it be said you haven't lived, John.

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Tis a bit like art...or painting. Its the overall (generally emotional) impression on the senses that counts. I can look at say a Turner, or a Constable or a Poussin and that creates an emotional impression because of its representation of something I sort of recognise as real or nearly real. I can also look at say Guernica which coveys in my mind the all the horror of that event without it being an accurate photograph. I can even appreciate a Jackson Pollock because of its associations with the immediate after-effects of my drunken stag-night at the Domino Club in Grey Mare Lane, Openshaw in June 1967

Exactly.The thing with music/art etc is that it triggers an emotional response in us. So "Tracks of my tears" by smokey and the miracles touches me in a way that nothing by Led Zep does. It doesn't mean Led Zep are ###### (which I would have claimed in my younger days) just that they don't reach me for some reason.

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Never let it be said you haven't lived, John.

I know its topic drift but.....see here

We used to go specially to see the ###### acts that were on between the strippers so what better place to be very ill on your stag night and end up asleep under the hedge in your best man's front garden one day before your wedding?

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