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Bedford Roughyed

HMV to go into Administration

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I feel sorry for the people who work there and the customers who've lost money but as for the company, screw 'em The likes of HMV and Virgin killed off the local independent shops. It's their turn now.

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Spent 25 quid in HMV on Sunday. That was a rare occurance though.

In Blackburn, the shop across from HMV as just closed (Bee.com) and the sad reality is that high street shopping for entertainment is quickly heading towards extinction.

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I stopped going into the Hull branch when the replaced the vinyl section with games and DVD's now I know they had to move with the times but to get rid of it totally lost them a lot of customers as it was the only place in the city to buy new vinyl after the local independent shop shut down.

On the plus side, mate, a couple of the local second hand dealers have filled that gap and are now selling brand new vinyl as well. I much prefer giving my money to them than to HMV.

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On the plus side, mate, a couple of the local second hand dealers have filled that gap and are now selling brand new vinyl as well.

Unfortunately, that isn't happening often enough, and the number of second-hand shops has also plummeted over the last 10-15 years, although there are signs that it has stabilised (albeit at a depressingly low number).

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I feel sorry for the people who work there and the customers who've lost money but as for the company, screw 'em The likes of HMV and Virgin killed off the local independent shops. It's their turn now.

Exactly as I see it.

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I don't think any large shops kill off smaller ones. It's us customers that do that. If we don't want to go any pay HMV's inflated prices, we won't.

People can sneer and call others sheep, but ultimately, if I can get a game or DVD or CD for quite a lot cheaper online, and have it delivered directly to my door, then that's what I'll do.

I'll try and support independent shops wherever I can, but only if they can offer me a decent service at a reasonable price.

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I have to say that shopping in an HMV shop, mainly in Market Street Manchester, has consistently been one of the most miserable, depressing and ultimate fruitless episodes of my life. Awful. I only did it a few times.

HMV has been in terminal decline for many years, its successive owners and managers just not capable of adapting to the tidal wave of change that the Internet has stimulated, in the same way that many independents have not responded either. It's just that independents have more flexibility with their finances and can run almost as a hobby if they want, just to stay open..or give up. Had there not been an HMV or had there not been Tower, or Virgin, the bigger influnces would still have been there in my view. You certainly can't uninvent the Internet and protectionism does not work, either.

There are of course independents who have adapted but in my view to blame HMV is incorrect. There is a bigger influences here: is is about identifying trends and embracing change, its about excellence in customer service, is about identifying needs and meeting them et.

Of course HMV has embarked upon a number of failed revamps which as left itself in huge debt and it is that debt that has proved unsustainable. I too fell sorry for the 4000 whose jobs are at risk - none of this is their fault.

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We may all end up with a high street like mine, almost totally made up of establishments offering the multitudinous delights of payday loans, crispy fried gristle, bookies, pound shops and a lot of former independent family-run shops (with now-permanently closed shutters).

But we've saved a quid here and there on the occasional DVD.

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Whilst there are many similarities between the Jessops and HMV situations, I'd suggest there are differences in their respective markets. Some items, such as expensive cameras, clothes, etc, people often like to touch, try on, etc before purchasing. In such cases, whilst high street stores need to be competitive price wise, I'd suggest it is not always the only issue. Good service also matters here, which is why people will often be prepared to pay a small premium to buy somewhere that they get good technical advice and service rather than online.

Other products, such as CDs/DVDs/books etc are probably very price sensitive on the whole, as people simply want the lowest price. Spending £1k on a camera, you probably want to talk the purchase over with someone who knows the product. Spending a £10 on a DVD, you don't.

HMV suffered due to being unable to compete on price, even if the price difference was small.

Jessops suffered by trying to get customers in store with competitive prices for their cameras, then fleece them by charging way over the odds for accessories, such as the £40 they wanted to charge me for the memory card I bought online for £11 when I'd just spent £400+ on a camera from them.

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We may all end up with a high street like mine, almost totally made up of establishments offering the multitudinous delights of payday loans, crispy fried gristle, bookies, pound shops and a lot of former independent family-run shops (with now-permanently closed shutters).

But we've saved a quid here and there on the occasional DVD.

But maybe the old High Street is no longer required. That may be sad, but what's the point of keeping things alive for nostalgiac reasons.

I don't like the make-up of town centres now with so many cheap and nasty shops, but I wonder if over time we will see more town centre homes with smaller high streets. I don't see that as a bad thing.

EDIT: also, it is not just about saving a quid or two here and there. It's about being able to shop 24:7, not having to pay to travel into town, not having to put up with the crowds, and then not necessarily finding the exact goods you want.

High Street's were built way before we had other, easier options.

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I think there will be a place for high street shopping, albeit reduced. Some people just prefer to go to a shop and buy things. Its like predictions of the death of print, some people will always prefer a physical copy of a book or mag rather than an electronic one.

I remember when videos became commonplace, people who knew, (!) said it was the end of the cinema....who would pay to go to the cinema when you can watch at home? Cinema is still here and possibly bigger than it was then.

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I think there will be a place for high street shopping, albeit reduced. Some people just prefer to go to a shop and buy things. Its like predictions of the death of print, some people will always prefer a physical copy of a book or mag rather than an electronic one.

I remember when videos became commonplace, people who knew, (!) said it was the end of the cinema....who would pay to go to the cinema when you can watch at home? Cinema is still here and possibly bigger than it was then.

I agree. I would never buy clothes online for example.

Unfortunately because the decline has been so quick, we now see many properties being used by the loan companies, pound shops etc. but I think over time this will settle down and High Streets will just become more condensed.

People still want to go out to eat, drink, buy clothes, meet people etc. The High Street needs to change.

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But maybe the old High Street is no longer required. That may be sad, but what's the point of keeping things alive for nostalgiac reasons.

I don't like the make-up of town centres now with so many cheap and nasty shops, but I wonder if over time we will see more town centre homes with smaller high streets. I don't see that as a bad thing.

EDIT: also, it is not just about saving a quid or two here and there. It's about being able to shop 24:7, not having to pay to travel into town, not having to put up with the crowds, and then not necessarily finding the exact goods you want.

High Street's were built way before we had other, easier options.

What about those without access to the internet? There must be millions of people who have never, and will never shop on-line.

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What about those without access to the internet? There must be millions of people who have never, and will never shop on-line.

As generations pass, that part of the population will almost certainly drop to a very small number. There'll always be some, for whatever reason, but there won't be enough for any business to see them as a significant factor.

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Quite so. There are the shopping centres - the ones I've been too are warm, dry, clean, tidy and not exposed to the weather. The better ones also have covered parking.

For those who can't, don't or won't drive, there are varying levels of public transport.

For those who can't, won't or don't want that, then yes the choice is getting less and less. Town centre rents and business rates too high? lack of free parking?

Round here, they run weekly coach trips to the shopping flesh-pots of Lincoln and Sheffield.

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As generations pass, that part of the population will almost certainly drop to a very small number. There'll always be some, for whatever reason, but there won't be enough for any business to see them as a significant factor.

In the future I quite agree, but I don't think we are at that stage yet.

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I don't think any large shops kill off smaller ones. It's us customers that do that. If we don't want to go any pay HMV's inflated prices, we won't.

People can sneer and call others sheep, but ultimately, if I can get a game or DVD or CD for quite a lot cheaper online, and have it delivered directly to my door, then that's what I'll do.

I'll try and support independent shops wherever I can, but only if they can offer me a decent service at a reasonable price.

Obviously it's where people spend their cash that decides who survives and who goes under but what you describe as 'HMV's inflated prices' were a result of their practice of undercutting small retailers who couldn't compete and went out of business as a result, leaving the way clear for HMV to inflate those prices and increase their profit margins. I appreciate that' it's just business and the market evolves continually but I'm not sorry to see the biter bit.

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I like to browse actual physically-present products, look through shelves and racks, and often end up buying something that wouldn't have normally occurred to me. Or spending more than I'd planned. I know I'm not alone in this, but if the portion of the buying public that just automatically buys new and/or heavily marketed products* is lucrative enough to support an industry, why should they pander to me?

*i.e. the X-Factor winner's first single**

**but not their second.***

***their last. ;)

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Obviously it's where people spend their cash that decides who survives and who goes under but what you describe as 'HMV's inflated prices' were a result of their practice of undercutting small retailers who couldn't compete and went out of business as a result, leaving the way clear for HMV to inflate those prices and increase their profit margins. I appreciate that' it's just business and the market evolves continually but I'm not sorry to see the biter bit.

1. Not sorry to see HMV go either. A retail bomb-site!( for their staff. it might even be blessed relief!! If...)

2. Not entirely convinced that small retailers can't compete. If they are as good (bad) as the HMV management, then maybe, but as in al competitive situations, they need to embrace change and use their smallness to be innovative and quick to adapt.

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But maybe the old High Street is no longer required. That may be sad, but what's the point of keeping things alive for nostalgiac reasons.

I don't like the make-up of town centres now with so many cheap and nasty shops, but I wonder if over time we will see more town centre homes with smaller high streets. I don't see that as a bad thing.

I imagine we might see more and more people returning to town and city centres to live. Not a bad thing IMO, many of them are like ghost towns once the shops close.

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Its not your imagination, I reckon it is happening already.

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I have only ever been in one HMV store (at Leeds when attending the World Club Challenge a few years back) so no impact on me.

Plus at my age all the stuff I want (Motown and Soul) comes very cheap from Tesco on compilation dvds. One of the advantages of getting old maybe :).

Re the voucher situation I listened to an interesting piece on Radio 4 (another example of old age LOL) when Comet closed and the financial expert on there was telling people NEVER to give vouchers as presents. He said cash is the only guaranteed redeemable.

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Whilst there are many similarities between the Jessops and HMV situations, I'd suggest there are differences in their respective markets. Some items, such as expensive cameras, clothes, etc, people often like to touch, try on, etc before purchasing. In such cases, whilst high street stores need to be competitive price wise, I'd suggest it is not always the only issue. Good service also matters here, which is why people will often be prepared to pay a small premium to buy somewhere that they get good technical advice and service rather than online.

Other products, such as CDs/DVDs/books etc are probably very price sensitive on the whole, as people simply want the lowest price. Spending £1k on a camera, you probably want to talk the purchase over with someone who knows the product. Spending a £10 on a DVD, you don't.

HMV suffered due to being unable to compete on price, even if the price difference was small.

Jessops suffered by trying to get customers in store with competitive prices for their cameras, then fleece them by charging way over the odds for accessories, such as the £40 they wanted to charge me for the memory card I bought online for £11 when I'd just spent £400+ on a camera from them.

quite

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What about those without access to the internet? There must be millions of people who have never, and will never shop on-line.

There will always be alternatives, and I partly expect that with the demise of HMV, we will see more successful independents as they can perhaps get better terms themselves.

It's not only the internet which is competing with the likes of HMV, as has been suggested, supermarkets are a major competitor.

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