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Bedford Roughyed

HMV to go into Administration

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We may all end up with a high street like mine, almost totally made up of establishments offering the multitudinous delights of payday loans, crispy fried gristle, bookies, pound shops and a lot of former independent family-run shops (with now-permanently closed shutters).

Do you live in Sintellins then?

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As generations pass, that part of the population will almost certainly drop to a very small number. There'll always be some, for whatever reason, but there won't be enough for any business to see them as a significant factor.

Not necessarily.

There are some things that are bucking the technology trend. For example, calendars. Paper calendars are as popular as ever, in spite of the various electronic alternatives. Also, there hasn't been a massive change in the popularity of physical Christmas greeting cards. You'd think that by now both of these 'old fashioned' retail items would be dead and buried. Apparently not. On a slightly different point, there has been a steady though very small rise in the interest in vinyl records. Here in Sintellins, known for its pound shops, betting shops and general crud as one retailer after another closes down, there is a thriving little vinyl record store. Whodathunk it? My parents have just bought a brand new VHS player/recorder. Granted, it's integrated with a DVD player but there are still enough VHS tapes around for Panasonic to consider it worthwhile producing the VHS element to the player/recorder.

It may be as you suggest and over time most shopping will be done over the Internet. However, just as according to an article I read in the paper today it would appear that the number of UK Facebook users is now flatlining, so it may be that the number of Internet shoppers will also flatline at some point in the future. A third possibility is that at some point in the future Internet shopping may start to become unpopular when people realise that they are becoming disconnected with others by spending most of their lives in front of a monitor on their saddo selves in their bedrooms/living rooms when there is a wide world out there, a coffee to be had, some books to leaf through or some clothes to try on preferably in the company of some good friends.

Or maybe not, as the shops all may be gone by then!

*Dystopia rules*

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Facebook is flatlining because people are realsing that it is a fatuous waste of time. Physical media is dieing if not dead.Downloads will be next as things like spotify take over.There is no going back to vhs.Retro vinyl is a tiny market even though growing will still be tiny. The high street is dying. Some quaint places such as Totnes will still have lots of indies but as fuel prices and car park costs continue to rise, so will on line shopping. Welcome to the 21st C. Just imagine the 22nd C

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Facebook is flatlining because people are realsing that it is a fatuous waste of time. Physical media is dieing if not dead.Downloads will be next as things like spotify take over.There is no going back to vhs.Retro vinyl is a tiny market even though growing will still be tiny. The high street is dying. Some quaint places such as Totnes will still have lots of indies but as fuel prices and car park costs continue to rise, so will on line shopping. Welcome to the 21st C. Just imagine the 22nd C

Facebook is flatlining because short of signing up ancestors and foetuses there's not much way it can do anything else.

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Facebook is flatlining because short of signing up ancestors and foetuses there's not much way it can do anything else.

52 million use Facebook in the UK apparently; one million fewer than the biggest user, the US. What's our population now? 67 million? That's a fair few foetuses!

The UK Facebook user number will include me because I'm registered. But I only ever go on there to read the Saints page. That's it. I wonder if there are many like me who don't actually use it at all but simply view it as just another webpage really.

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Facebook maybe flat lining but one of the reasons Morrisons gave for a bad Christmas period for them was a there online presence (or lack of it).

Why actually spend an hour in Tesco's when it can be delivered to your door at a time you request. (with added horsemeat...)

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IMO people will turn off online shopping as half of the time the stuff you receive is suspect (ie fruit that you wouldn't accept)

Unless there is a big raising of standards in that area anyway .

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In which category am I? :-)

According to some theories you are all and everything and nothing at once in an instant and forever.

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This just in...It not just high street retail that is in turmoil.....Youtube, Twitter and Facebook are to merge.

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To become YouTwitFace. :)

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It's not only the internet which is competing with the likes of HMV, as has been suggested, supermarkets are a major competitor.

Which is a major problem, as they will only stock a very narrow range of CDs and DVDs - Chart stuff plus 'same old same old' compilations, endlessly repackaging the usual golden oldie suspects. Basically, the equivalent of that bin full of cassettes you used to find in petrol stations.

HMV left me behind as a customer, as there seemed to be less and less actual music each time they revamped their branches. And we have to remember they were part of the unofficial cartel that kept album prices artificially high for so many years, and fiercely defended that practice.

Still, it's a shame, especially when you hear interviews in the shop from people who freely admit to browsing the shelves of record shops, then placing orders via Amazon. They will have no right to complain when their record shop dies, but they'll complain anyway, thanks to their pointy-headed sense of entitlement.

That was one of the things that brought the excellent Borders down too. The free Wi-Fi meant that they actually paid for people to shaft them.

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Which is a major problem, as they will only stock a very narrow range of CDs and DVDs - Chart stuff plus 'same old same old' compilations, endlessly repackaging the usual golden oldie suspects. Basically, the equivalent of that bin full of cassettes you used to find in petrol stations.

HMV left me behind as a customer, as there seemed to be less and less actual music each time they revamped their branches. And we have to remember they were part of the unofficial cartel that kept album prices artificially high for so many years, and fiercely defended that practice.

Still, it's a shame, especially when you hear interviews in the shop from people who freely admit to browsing the shelves of record shops, then placing orders via Amazon. They will have no right to complain when their record shop dies, but they'll complain anyway, thanks to their pointy-headed sense of entitlement.

That was one of the things that brought the excellent Borders down too. The free Wi-Fi meant that they actually paid for people to shaft them.

Quite so, but you can very often listen on line to samples on Amazon. Then of course there is always Spotify.

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HMV CEO Trevor Moore was previously chief executive of Jessops.

He replaced previous HMV CEO Simon Fox in September last year.

Fox was previously MD of Comet.

And now Simon Fox is CEO of my company!!!

I think I may start looking for a new job!

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IMO people will turn off online shopping as half of the time the stuff you receive is suspect (ie fruit that you wouldn't accept)

Unless there is a big raising of standards in that area anyway .

We had a couple of goes at online grocery shopping and that is the problem we had or substituted items not being similar to the items ordered.

I buy quite a lot of things online, including clothes. I know what size I am and have never had a problem with sizing. I have a couple of female friends who claim for some reason clothes bought online are a size smaller than those in the shops ;)

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Still, it's a shame, especially when you hear interviews in the shop from people who freely admit to browsing the shelves of record shops, then placing orders via Amazon. They will have no right to complain when their record shop dies, but they'll complain anyway, thanks to their pointy-headed sense of entitlement.

Amazon were very smart putting a barcode reader in their smartphone app. Pop along to a store, find an item you like, scan with your phone and hey presto immediate price comparison and one click ordering.

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Tenuous League in strange places as apparently new Bulls director Kate Hardcastle was on Newsnight yesterday regarding HMV and the high street in general...

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Tenuous League in strange places as apparently new Bulls director Kate Hardcastle was on Newsnight yesterday regarding HMV and the high street in general...

She was indeed. I watched it.

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Breaking news: Blockbuster UK have just gone into administration too.

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Breaking news: Blockbuster UK have just gone into administration too.

Scary that I thought they had gone bump years ago...

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One of those brands that I suspect we all think fondly off, similar to Woolworths but rarely used.

Buy most of my music as digital downloads these days and when I do buy CDs it tends to be when having a wonder around Picaddilly Records or Vinyl Exchange simply because the prominent choice was a little less "X Factory" and they give prominence to some stuff I'd never have found in a shop like HMV.

If you ever got the "Top 100 of 20??" booklet that Piccadilly Records produced every year, you would notice that a lot of the "more mainstream" selections would appear in the "2 for £5" section at HMV very soon after.

Obviously someone at HMV was doing a little bit of research - just not enough !

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Good news(ish) for those with HMV vouchers. According to MSE some other stores will accept them as part payment.

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If you ever got the "Top 100 of 20??" booklet that Piccadilly Records produced every year, you would notice that a lot of the "more mainstream" selections would appear in the "2 for £5" section at HMV very soon after.

Obviously someone at HMV was doing a little bit of research - just not enough !

I'll be honest that'd have passed me by on the basis that I'd have seen the list and bought from Piccadilly Records more often than not! :)

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Scary that I thought they had gone bump years ago...

me too

video shops eh: an important part of UK social history a symbol of the 1980s

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