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Saint Billinge

Young ladies barred from the workplace because of...!

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bare-chested men at work. In the 1960s, Pilkington Brothers operated a policy of barring young ladies from entering an area where bare-chested men worked. How times have changed.

Do you have any interesting snippets from the past?

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Posted · Hidden by John Drake, January 25, 2013 - No reason given

We used to go to the pub on a Friday lunchtime, at Mount Vernon, Northwood, nothing silly, just a pint & a pub lunch, todays "Modern NHS" you'd never be allowed to do that.

When I worked in Orsett, in Essex, in Theatre we had the pub opposite on a fast dial, so we could order our lunch before leaving & by the time we had got changed, and crossed the road, our lunch was waiting for us.

At Guy's Hospital, one of my colleagues, who used to be a Jockey, used to go out for his lunch in the pub behind Guy's, put his bets on, and be back in half an hour.

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 23, 2013 - No reason given

We used to go to the pub on a Friday lunchtime, at Mount Vernon, Northwood, nothing silly, just a pint & a pub lunch, todays "Modern NHS" you'd never be allowed to do that.

No.

But I understand some staff within the NHS get drunk and drive cars uninsured.

And then, having been allowed to keep their job, storm out of it anyway.

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When I came to Bradford in the early 1970's: -

- many (most?) pubs wouldn't allow any women in the tap room, other than barmaids and the landlady.

- most pubs wouldn't let a woman have a pint glass and most women were offended if theirs wasn't served in a ladies half-pint glass (i.e. one with a bowl a stem and a foot).

- no-one outside West Indian bars was allowed to drink direct from a bottle or can.

- women couldn't be full members of most working men's clubs.They could be social members but weren't allowed to vote on administrative issues or stand for election to the committee.

Obviously,not everything has changed for the better since ;)B)

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 23, 2013 - No reason given

No.

But I understand some staff within the NHS get drunk and drive cars uninsured.

And then, having been allowed to keep their job, storm out of it anyway.

Oo, snap!

My father spoke of a time whilst he was an engineer where it was common to have a three pints at lunch and go back and operate heavy machinery. All no doubt with a fag hanging out the side of the mouth and sporting cool sideburns.

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When I came to Bradford in the early 1970's: -

- many (most?) pubs wouldn't allow any women in the tap room, other than barmaids and the landlady.

- most pubs wouldn't let a woman have a pint glass and most women were offended if theirs wasn't served in a ladies half-pint glass (i.e. one with a bowl a stem and a foot).

- no-one outside West Indian bars was allowed to drink direct from a bottle or can.

- women couldn't be full members of most working men's clubs.They could be social members but weren't allowed to vote on administrative issues or stand for election to the committee.

Obviously,not everything has changed for the better since ;)B)

Those women who did frequent taprooms in years gone by were looked down upon as lower life.

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 23, 2013 - No reason given

No.

But I understand some staff within the NHS get drunk and drive cars uninsured.

And then, having been allowed to keep their job, storm out of it anyway.

And I understand some people who work in the charitable sector are 'holier than thou'.

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 23, 2013 - No reason given

No.

But I understand some staff within the NHS get drunk and drive cars uninsured.

And then, having been allowed to keep their job, storm out of it anyway.

FFS!!!! cheap and uncalled for

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 23, 2013 - No reason given

And I understand some people who work in the charitable sector are 'holier than thou'.

Only those at the JRF,

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 23, 2013 - No reason given

FFS!!!! cheap and uncalled for

I'm very unforgiving when it comes to drunk drivers.

Lowest of the low.

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:dry:

A number of posts removed. Please do not derail threads that bluntly.

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With pubs in St Helens once closing at 2.30pm, regulars would pop over to Widnes for an extra half-hour drinking, where the opening/closing times differed. I seem to recall a pub on the Lancs/Yorks border having different opening/closing times in the bar and lounge.

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 24, 2013 - No reason given

Please do not derail threads that bluntly.

Should I be more subtle in pointing out that somebody who laments that the modern NHS frowns on people drinking during the working day was found guilty of driving whilst uninsured and drunk vehicles that belonged to the NHS?

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1. When I started work as a graduate computer hardware engineer in 1968 we had to clock in, were quarter-houred if more than five mins late. we had to clock off and on at lunchtime, too.

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2. My first trip in a company car was to Milford Haven in one of these: 800px-Austin_A60_Cambridge_Countryman_1966.jpg

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3.. Prior to going to Leningrad in 1975 to fix a broken system, I was called in to see our Head of Security and warned not to let any "ladies" into my hotel room at night. I waited up all night, but none came knocking.

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Posted · Hidden by John Drake, January 25, 2013 - No reason given

We used to go to the pub on a Friday lunchtime, at Mount Vernon, Northwood, nothing silly, just a pint & a pub lunch, todays "Modern NHS" you'd never be allowed to do that.

When I worked in Orsett, in Essex, in Theatre we had the pub opposite on a fast dial, so we could order our lunch before leaving & by the time we had got changed, and crossed the road, our lunch was waiting for us.

At Guy's Hospital, one of my colleagues, who used to be a Jockey, used to go out for his lunch in the pub behind Guy's, put his bets on, and be back in half an hour.

It's political correctness gone mad. I blame the EU. Or immigrants. Fancy not allowing healthcare professionals to drink whilst on duty.

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John M re: point 1. What's unusual about that? Its still commonplace.

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When I first started as a civil servant in 1989 there was still one bloke who came to work in Victoria Street wearing a pin striped suit and a bowler hat. On my first day at work I was given the codes for the secret files, and a copy of "Their Trade is Treachery" by Chapman Pincher. I also used to smoke throughout the day at my desk.

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 24, 2013 - No reason given

Should I be more subtle in pointing out that somebody who laments that the modern NHS frowns on people drinking during the working day was found guilty of driving whilst uninsured and drunk vehicles that belonged to the NHS?

How about just dropping it and stop being such ######?

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 24, 2013 - No reason given

How about just dropping it and stop being such ######?

Quite!

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John M re: point 1. What's unusual about that? Its still commonplace.

I worked in a hinge factory in 1999 and that was also the practice.

My father tells me of the good old days when you would have three pints at lunchtime and be operating heavy machinery all afternoon.

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John M re: point 1. What's unusual about that? Its still commonplace.

Really? It lasted for a year and then we didn't have to do it and I've never clocked in since.

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 24, 2013 - No reason given

How about just dropping it and stop being such ######?

I see no reason to. Bleep's shown precisely jack-all remorse for repeatedly endangering people's lives through his boozed-up shenanigans and instead laughably comes on to lament that he can no longer drink at work.

Quite!

I haven't seen you so erect since the last time you predicted the demise of the coalition within a fortnight.

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I worked in a hinge factory in 1999 and that was also the practice.

My father tells me of the good old days when you would have three pints at lunchtime and be operating heavy machinery all afternoon.

The thing was , we were not shop floor, who still clocked on and off for years after. we were graduates with an inflated sense of our worth and intellectual capacity. :O

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 24, 2013 - No reason given

I see no reason to. Bleep's shown precisely jack-all remorse for repeatedly endangering people's lives through his boozed-up shenanigans and instead laughably comes on to lament that he can no longer drink at work.

I haven't seen you so erect since the last time you predicted the demise of the coalition within a fortnight.

Sanctimony really is a pitiful trait.

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 24, 2013 - No reason given

Sanctimony really is a pitiful trait.

indeed it is

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