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Saint Billinge

Young ladies barred from the workplace because of...!

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 24, 2013 - No reason given

Sanctimony really is a pitiful trait.

Being an unapologetic uninsured drunk driver is worse.

I can't kill you by being a #####.

However much I may try.

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Posted · Hidden by ckn, January 24, 2013 - No reason given

Being an unapologetic uninsured drunk driver is worse.

I can't kill you by being a #####.

However much I may try.

The guy admitted on here he has a problem and had made some very bad choices. What he did was very wrong no-one is pretending otherwise, but you drag it into every thread he comments on.

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A number of posts deleted. The point has been made before, I have sympathy with it, but it's getting in the way of other uninvolved people enjoying threads now.

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Young ladies are now allowed to be killed on the front line in the USA military from today. How we have progressed.

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Young ladies are now allowed to be killed on the front line in the USA military from today. How we have progressed.

That's equality for you.

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Posted · Hidden by John Drake, January 25, 2013 - No reason given

A number of posts deleted. The point has been made before, I have sympathy with it, but it's getting in the way of other uninvolved people enjoying threads now.

The offending post by the offensive soak is still there

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John M re: point 1. What's unusual about that? Its still commonplace.

One company not so long ago made the workers clock off just for a visit to the toilet.

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One company not so long ago made the workers clock off just for a visit to the toilet.

I believe it is still common in call centres. When I worked in one, briefly, in 2000 you had to put your hand up and ask permission if you wanted to leave the room to go to the toilet! I was like being back at school.

When I first started work in 1979 as a labourer in a builders merchants we used to go to the pub every Thursday (pay day) lunch time and consume a (under age) liquid lunch. We would often return to find a 10 ton wagon load of cement waiting for us to 'hand ball' into the cement shed. Lugging a couple of hundred 1 cwt (50kg for the youngsters out there ;)) bags of cement soon sobered you up.

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One company not so long ago made the workers clock off just for a visit to the toilet.

Surely that is illegal? :huh:

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Surely that is illegal? :huh:

Whether illegal or not, that's what happened. You have to be 'relieved' if you want to go to the toilet whilst working on a production line. You simply cannot just walk off. :D

One factory where I once worked turned a blind eye to illegal operations! With jobs under threat, many workers don't complain.

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I believe it is still common in call centres.

Yup. Friend who worked for British Gas until a couple of weeks ago had to clock out for bog breaks.

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At one place i worked in the early 80's there used to be a pecking order for morning toilet breaks (ie reading the paper). Time served had priority over apprentices and would disappear for up to an hour.

Apprentices used to get their own back because the toilet was basically a trough of running water and they made paper boats and set fire to them and sent them floating down the trough burning various ***** as they went.

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One job I had, we got a £20 book of luncheon vouchers every month, and one bloke used to head off down the road to a shop that would exchange them for a bottle of vodka. He was not a lot of use for the rest of the afternoon.

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I used to work on the demolition in the mid 80's and the things that went on would see them shut down asap. I worked on a concrete crusher (ie huge lumps of concrete floor smashed up for hardcore) and when I say there was no H&S, that's being kind. Scary to think about it now!!

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I used to work on the demolition in the mid 80's and the things that went on would see them shut down asap. I worked on a concrete crusher (ie huge lumps of concrete floor smashed up for hardcore) and when I say there was no H&S, that's being kind. Scary to think about it now!!

It appears H&S is being ignored in today's financial climate!

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It appears H&S is being ignored in today's financial climate!

In certain places it is ignored and even when its applied, its when it suits. I'm H&S fan but when you get idiots walking round with a clipboard citing 'hazards' like a piece of paper not in the bin then it gets on my t its. Because all they are doing is justifying a unnecessary (well paid) job.

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Looking at the entertainment industry, St Helens folk once had a choice of at least twelve cinemas in the town. Today, there is just one multi-screen. Likewise, I just wonder how many more pubs will disappear in the future? Many of my old haunts are now either boarded up, turned into apartments or demolished.

I heard someone recently moan about too many charity shops in town centres. Even they are now feeling the pinch from a decline in customers.

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I served my time at a bottle factory, the batch plant was the height of 2 or 3 houses one on top of the other. We used to stand at the edge of the roof with our heels on the edge, step into the roof a certain number of paces. Then we would turn round and walk the same number of paces back to the edge blindfolded of course.

Another good bit was in the cullet cellar, just to keep us on our toes we'd done safety glasses and throw bottles from 50/60 feet away at each other.

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I served my time at a bottle factory, the batch plant was the height of 2 or 3 houses one on top of the other. We used to stand at the edge of the roof with our heels on the edge, step into the roof a certain number of paces. Then we would turn round and walk the same number of paces back to the edge blindfolded of course.

Another good bit was in the cullet cellar, just to keep us on our toes we'd done safety glasses and throw bottles from 50/60 feet away at each other.

Was it Foster's? I worked both at Revenhead Glass and UGB. Many people lost their pension rights when the company went bust.

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