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gingerjon

Is your MP a relic from the 1950s?

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Stonewall is not representative of all gays. You know, the unfamous ones not all over twitter, just the regular guys and girls living their life in boring suburbia, who just happen to be gay and don't need a rep to tell them they are ok.

And they can now get on with their lives in the same fuss-free way.

It's regular 'guys and guys and girls and girls' though. That's what marks them out.

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whilst my dad was a vicar he blocked several weddings that were to take place in his churches because the people were not sufficiently committed and/or Christianish.

If only he'd been at St Johns in Bradford in 1974.

:( ;)

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How would that be covered by the equalities legislation?

I think ckn might have covered it above. Like I say, I don't know.

Religious rights are often protected though, especially in religious settings. As opposed to B&Bs.

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If only he'd been at St Johns in Bradford in 1974.

:( ;)

:D

If you'd stayed in Wales he could have seen you right.

Cwmbran around then, I think.

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whilst my dad was a vicar he blocked several weddings that were to take place in his churches because the people were not sufficiently committed and/or Christianish.

Slightly off-topic but in order to get her son christened my cousin has been told to clock up a few hours at the church.

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Face it, most people, gay or otherwise don't go to church. So who gives a monkeys if you can't get married in one?

Unless you need to be seen to be doing the right thing. A close friend of mine who is both gay and a vegetarian said to me 'it strikes me like veggies demanding the right to eat meat...ie pointless'

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Slightly off-topic but in order to get her son christened my cousin has been told to clock up a few hours at the church.

Same here and I said thanks but no thanks. As a result none of my kids have ever been christened. And with my family that caused some grief.

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:D

If you'd stayed in Wales he could have seen you right.

Cwmbran around then, I think.

Did he have his own shotgun, or did the happy couple generally fetch their own?

:D

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Slightly off topic, but this snippet from history sprang to mind:-

The Earl of Arran whose Private Peer's Bill was enacted to make homosexuality legal in Great Britain (Northern Ireland had to wait much longer) later introduced a bill to protect badgers.

He complained to a friend that he had a full turn out in the Lords to debate his 'buggers' bill but an empty house for the badgers' bill.

His friend replied,'That's because there are no badgers in the House of Lords.'

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Slightly off-topic but in order to get her son christened my cousin has been told to clock up a few hours at the church.

I'd advise them to get Angry Birds on silent on their phone.

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I'd advise them to get Angry Birds on silent on their phone.

:unsure::huh: passed me by that one.

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Slightly off-topic but in order to get her son christened my cousin has been told to clock up a few hours at the church.

If she doesn't already go to church, why the desire to get her son christened? I've sat through plenty of christenings over the years, and I've yet to get a logical explanation as to why non religious adults feel the need to have their child become a "member of the church", when they'll probably never set foot in one again.

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If she doesn't already go to church, why the desire to get her son christened? I've sat through plenty of christenings over the years, and I've yet to get a logical explanation as to why non religious adults feel the need to have their child become a "member of the church", when they'll probably never set foot in one again.

No idea. I'm just praying it doesn't clash with a Bulls game!

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No idea. I'm just praying it doesn't clash with a Bulls game!

:lol:

When I got married, I was under strict instructions with my father in law to be that I had to make sure the wedding didn't clash with a Burnley home game. I managed that, then missed Fev in the GF (2010) as I was in Heathrow, about to catch a plane to South Africa on honeymoon. :rolleyes: Still, given their record prior to then, why would I have given that prospect a 2nd thought when planning it all? :D

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Greg Mulholland's my MP. He's a lib dem but he's ok. I've had lots of dealings wit him via local amatuer rugby and other stuff.

The MPs and others who go on about marriag being for the procreation of children puzzle me. Does this mean that heterosexual couples who are unable or don't wish to have xhildren should b prevented from marrying?

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When we announced that my son would not be christened, my daft ma-in-law was horrified as she believed he would not "come on"..mind you, she is from Wigan. My son is now a well- built 6 ft 2in. god knows what he's be like if he had been christened. His cousin Dave is 6 ft 7!

Oh and back on topic. my MP , Peter Tapsell, voted against. Mind you , this is Lincolnshire where we have no truck with left wing parties such as BNP and UKIP.

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My MP voted for it. Our next door independant (currently) MP voted against it (her speach wittered on about divorce despite her affair with a married man).

My old MP voted against it and he is Labour. (I think he is also anti-abortion, anti stem cells, etc)

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I doubt the whole thing tells you anything anyway, MP's would back anything if they thought it would get them another term.

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Friend of rugby league and all around good egg, Clare Balding is now to marry her civil partner Alice Arnold.

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Friend of rugby league and all around good egg, Clare Balding is now to marry her civil partner Alice Arnold.

#notoncupfinalday

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What amused me was the reaction in certain below-the-line comments sections, where people played what I like to call the 'slippery slope game' and imagined that one sensible change in the law, which represents decades of change in societal views, meant the end of society.

Aside from 'does this mean I can marry my sister and the rest of the women on my street', my particular favourite was one that suggested we would now get people 'trying to marry the Eiffel Tower'.

I don't have a local MP, but there were a number of comments suggesting that this was probably part of an EU Directive.

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Friend of rugby league and all around good egg, Clare Balding is now to marry her civil partner Alice Arnold.

I know literally loads of LGBT people who aren't getting married imminently, so this law is stupid and inappropriate.

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Of course you can't marry the Eiffel Tower. It's French. No sane Englishman would marry a Frencher and you're not allowed to marry if you're mad.

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What amused me was the reaction in certain below-the-line comments sections, where people played what I like to call the 'slippery slope game' and imagined that one sensible change in the law, which represents decades of change in societal views, meant the end of society.

Aside from 'does this mean I can marry my sister and the rest of the women on my street', my particular favourite was one that suggested we would now get people 'trying to marry the Eiffel Tower'.

I don't have a local MP, but there were a number of comments suggesting that this was probably part of an EU Directive.

numerous on the Mail saying they wanted to marry their hamster, cat etc, It should not be allowed on the grounds it would deplete the animal gene pool. the plan is working though, as many also claimed to be leaving the Tory Party to join UKIP. Good riddance!

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